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An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 8,307

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Marios Sophia Prodromou is a member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: the “Rat King”; other names; Caelestis; Spade; Draco; preferred name; meanings; the meaning of “Rat” and “King” in “Rat King”; feel hated by “most people”; other animal examples than a rat; the queens; a queen; the best minds; one name; degree and manner of different; the more explicit reference to lightness and darkness; the meaning of light; the origin and meaning of the name Marios Sophia Prodromou; John the Baptist; the Virgin Mary; the forms of parenting; family history and development as a Cypriot; the values of Scottish society; the values of Cypriot society; modern Scottish and Cypriot society; being a Cypriot; Turkey; Turkish mistakes; innocents; Erdogan’s attempt at recreation or reconsolidation of the (Neo-)Ottoman Empire through a Turkish expansionism; Greece; Greek mistakes; the Greeks obsessed with money; My Big Fat Greek Wedding; 6-sigma, or even 5-sigma, people within the high-IQ community; being introverted; no desire to interact with other high-range people, “really”; the discovery of giftedness; some other tests; the societal view of giftedness in Cyprus; other media opportunities; programs on television; “Prince Show”; the purpose; “With Love Christina”; nervous in both appearances; desire or want to be a somebody rather than a “nobody”; knowledge and Sophia; Greeks with an obsession on money; Sophia and knowledge; a real genius; a faux genius; more real geniuses or faux geniuses; people who fake striving to be a nobody while being a somebody as their main goal; some work pursuits; mental coaching; pressure for pupils; how much faster for most of the pupils; some of the basic strategies; some of the intermediate strategies; common, uncommon, and rare personality styles of the children; intellectual issues; public and private intellectuals; some educational attainments; social philosophy; political philosophy; economic philosophy; favourite philosopher; religious/non-religious philosophy; being balanced; kind of God; the argument for this God; the evidence for this God; most people’s hearts; fairness; justice; a single term, even a neologism, covering the idea of fairness and justice in unison; a supernatural order, a natural order, or both; definition of paranormal, supernatural, metaphysical, and natural, material, and physical in this context; the precise meaning of the idea of a paranormal “experience”; a paranormal experience; ethical philosophy; worldview; the British background influence the personal perception of the Cypriot society; inspiring kids; “tough”; alone; a member of “World Genius Directory, Prometheus, Mensa International, Epimetheus, GENIUS Umbrella Organization, sPIqr, Vertex, Grand IQ Society, Tetra, GOTHIQ, LEVIATHAN 160, Triple Nine Society, HELLIQ, The Glia Society, UBERIQ, TENIQ and many others”; societies; most reliable in providing a social and intellectual space over a long period of time for members; one spent the most time interacting with if at all; becoming a person of a value versus becoming a person of success; value less fungible than money in some fundamental sense; Madonna right, after all, but for everyone rather than just “girls”; success; value; common notions of success amongst the Greeks other than making lots and lots of money; kind of values must one have to make the “value” of “making an impact on your community”; esotericism and symbology; the Dudeist philosophy; Dudeism; open-minded; to be “everywhere”; the public alternative religious and philosophical groups; some characteristics of the secret groups without precise details of them; work or worked as a postal officer; working on some intellectual problem; the parts that are non-secretive and esoteric; kind of self-improvement; a small capacity of the brain; more men in the high-IQ societies than the women; the smartest person in history; Tesla; some of the smartest people alive now; Musk; Gates; Trump; religion and theology; faith; “ancient and secret esoteric knowledge”; kinds of symbols; the main symbols; the truth; thoughts on atheism; thoughts on theism; thoughts on agnosticism; mainly learned from purported secret esoteric knowledge; some hints or indications as to the purpose of life; changes in life; why pursue this course in life; how we know it’s ancient knowledge; those who simply cannot ‘take your word for it’; the unseen and rather a hallucination; unsatisfying and akin to a non-answer; Greek Orthodox Church; more wrong or more rights as a theology; forced and inertia-based belief in Greek Orthodox Christianity; their image of the nature of world, human beings, and the relations of human beings to one another and the world; creativity; intelligence; intuition; intuition truly a form of intelligence or more a subjectively formalized, experientially developed sensibility about life and its meanderings; genius; purpose of having ancient esoteric secret knowledge in the first place; idea as to authorship of the inscription; Mount Athos; “ancient knowledge”; the freemasons; the organization make most of them pawns; The Church of Satan, First Satanic Church, The Satanic Temple, Luciferianism, Order of Nine Angles, or the Temple of Set; The Church of Satan; First Satanic Church; The Satanic Temple; Luciferianism; Order of Nine Angles; the Temple of Set; literal or metaphorical (or both) angels and demons; Anton LaVey; his work been modified for better or for worse; Aleister Crowley or his self-claimed follower Timothy Leary; Anton LaVey; the nature of good and evil; thoughts on those who claim this is moral relativism; science and philosophy; ‘fact’; “idea”; poor decisions; differentiate intuition from other internal ‘talks’; the Gospel of John alongside of the Synoptic Gospels; a holy text; a particular religious text coming from the ancient world; Margaret Atwood; intuition; coming to terms with the world; words of advice or guidance to younger members of the profoundly gifted cohort who could use some guidance; For those parents with a profoundly gifted child; difficulties for some members of the profoundly gifted community; 1-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 2-sigma intelligence; -sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 3-sigma intelligence; 3-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 4-sigma intelligence; -sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 5-sigma intelligence; 5-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 6-sigma intelligence; societies emphasizing excellence more than equity; some of the oldest secret societies; the secret societies and the alternative theistic groups like the freemasons; things of annoyance; more at ease, at peace, with the world; ever plan to move away from Greece-Cyprus-Turkey area back to the United Kingdom or some other place; lifework; the general life trajectory; to end up; metaphysics; metaphysics from Dudeism; the most creative person in history; the best writer in history; the typical societal expectations of Greek heritage women; the typical societal expectations of Greek heritage men; and some cultural nuances largely known only to the Greeks about the ways in which men and women, old and young, blue-collar and white-collar, and so on, exist in Greek society, in Cypriot society, and in the diaspora with Greek heritage.

Keywords: Caelestis, Cyprus, dark, Draco, genius, Greek, heritage, light, Marios Sophia Prodromou, names, religion, Spade.

An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: You’re amongst the highest range high-scorers in the niche community of alternative intelligence test takers. First things first, why the “Rat King”?

Marios Sophia Prodromou: I go by many names. There can’t be light without darkness.

2. Jacobsen: What other names?

Prodromou: Caelestis, Spade and Draco to name a few.

3. Jacobsen: What does Caelestis mean in this context? Why select it, or have it endowed to you?

Prodromou: I like to think of myself as celestial or out of this world.

4. Jacobsen: What does Spade mean in this context? Why select it, or have it endowed to you?

Prodromou: I like to dig for knowledge. The Ace of Spades by Motorhead is also one of my favourite songs.

5. Jacobsen: What does Draco mean in this context? Why select it, or have it endowed to you?

Prodromou: Dragon.

6. Jacobsen: Any preferred name out of the many?

Prodromou: Draco Caelestis or celestrial dragon.

7. Jacobsen: What interrelates these meanings (other than the obvious idea of the person, you)?

Prodromou: My knowledge of reality.

8. Jacobsen: What is the meaning of “Rat” and “King” in “Rat King”?

Prodromou: Most people hate rats but they have their purpose. It is better to be a king among rats rather than a peasant among men.

9. Jacobsen: Do you feel hated by “most people”? If so, why? If not, why not?

Prodromou: I do. There is a lot of jealousy in the world and I’m not your ordinary social butterfly. 

10. Jacobsen: Any other animal examples than a rat – perhaps more palatable to the imagination?

Prodromou: Dragon, lion and Eagle. 

11. Jacobsen: What about the queens?

Prodromou: A queen is just as important as a king. 

12. Jacobsen: Do you have a queen?

Prodromou: Sophia.

13. Jacobsen: Do you consider the best minds among the rats/people the “most hated,” and for good reason? Is this a variation on better to reign in hell than serve in heaven?

Prodromou: My birthday this year coincided with the beginning of the year of the rat. Great year it’s been so far. I can’t get Horned rats out of my mind.

14. Jacobsen: Why not simply go by one name?

Prodromou: I strive to be different.

15. Jacobsen: How much, and in what way? Why that degree and manner of different?

Prodromou: If you are one of the many you will always be average. As different ad it gets.

16. Jacobsen: What is the more explicit reference to lightness and darkness? Usually, this comes with some philosophical or theological position on life. Is this the intended meaning?

Prodromou: Lux in tenebris. A more detailed version is found in the Gospel of John. The light shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot comprehend it. I like to be significant but also go about unnoticed.

17. Jacobsen: What about tenebris in lux? What is the meaning of light here rather than a reference? Is this in reference to the light of God and the darkness of the prime fallen angel, prime evil?

Prodromou: Evil depends on intention. A knife can cut your food or can kill somebody. Again I believe in dualism and that evil and good are just different poles of the same coin

18. Jacobsen: What is the origin and meaning of the name Marios Sophia Prodromou?

Prodromou: My grandmother was called Maria and I was also named in honor of the Virgin Mary. My mother had trouble giving birth and prayed to the Virgin Mary to help her conceive. Prodromou is the family name and means forerunner after John the Baptist or Prodromos in Greek.

19. Jacobsen: In this context, what does John the Baptist mean to you, personally?

Prodromou: I like his way of life. Being a loner. He had a bigger role than what he is credited. Just ask the Knights Templars.

20. Jacobsen: Also, what does the Virgin Mary mean to you, personally?

Prodromou: The divine feminine.

21. Jacobsen: What were the forms of parenting towards you, in the context of being rather special child in rarity, in cognition and in odds of conception for your mother?

Prodromou: I was given my space and a lot of love.

23. Jacobsen: What is family history and development as a Cypriot?

Prodromou: Both parents are Cypriots although I was born in Scotland.

24. Jacobsen: What are the values of Scottish society?

Prodromou: Respect for their history. They know where they came from.

25. Jacobsen: How do these mix with the values of Cypriot society if at all?

Prodromou: Cypriots care more about the present than the past.

26. Jacobsen: Are modern Scottish and Cypriot society more at odds or at parallels?

Prodromou: They are very different.

27. Jacobsen: What does being a Cypriot do for personal social and political views regarding Greece, Cyprus, and Turkey?

Prodromou: Both Turkey and Greece have made mistakes. I am a Greek Cypriot but am always open-minded when it comes to politics.

28. Jacobsen: What mistakes has Turkey made?

Prodromou: They are obsessed with world dominance. Killed many innocent people in their endeavors. 

29. Jacobsen: How will Turkish mistakes come to haunt them?

Prodromou: Karma is a bitch not just for Turkey but for everybody.

30. Jacobsen: How many innocents are estimated?

Prodromou: I’d rather not put a number to it.

31. Jacobsen: Is this Erdogan’s attempt at recreation or reconsolidation of the (Neo-)Ottoman Empire through a Turkish expansionism?

Prodromou: Not only Eedogan’s but those that went before him and those that will come after him.

32. Jacobsen: What mistakes has Greece made?

Prodromou: Greeks are obsessed with money. The result is selling out their country. The ministry of defence sold a submarine owned by his military.

33. Jacobsen: How will the Greek mistakes come back to bite them in the behind more?

Prodromou: Already the economy is a mess.

34. Jacobsen: Have the Greeks always been obsessed with money?

Prodromou: Not always. But when they were given a little sugar they developed a sweet tooth.

35. Jacobsen: How accurate is My Big Fat Greek Wedding, the movie, to Greek culture, especially in times of courting and marriage and potential in-law interactions?

Prodromou: It is quite accurate. Parents can become obsessed with their kids. In Scotland they leave the nest at 18 in Greece ans Cyprus they can stay forever. Well at least till marriage.

36. Jacobsen: Have you ever met or interacted with many other 6-sigma, or even 5-sigma, people within the high-IQ community? If so, what was the experience? If not, other than statistical rarity, why not?

Prodromou: I can’t say that I have. They are hard to find and I am highly introverted.

37. Jacobsen: Why so introverted?

Prodromou: I was an only child. I learnt to be my best friend.

38. Jacobsen: Would you like to interact with them?

Prodromou: Not really. I’m a loner.

39. Jacobsen: How was the discovery of giftedness? What is important to bear in mind about alternative intelligence tests? What alternative intelligence tests/non-mainstream tests seem reliable and valid to you?

Prodromou: I scored 98/100 on the old Millers Analogy Test that I used to matriculate into the College of New Jersey Master of Education program

40. Jacobsen: What have been some other tests? What are the implied scores and standard deviations of said scores? What have been the range of the scores from the lowest to the highest?

Prodromou: My highest was 190+ on MACH. I have scored around 170 on tests by Iacovos Koukas. It all depends on how much effort I put into the test. I did my 170 in 2 hours where I took 6 months to answer the MACH.

41. Jacobsen: What is the societal view of giftedness in Cyprus?

Prodromou: I’ve been twice on national TV but I remain an unknown nobody.

42. Jacobsen: Have there been other media opportunities, which you’ve turned down?

Prodromou: Many. I don’t go there for the fame. 

43. Jacobsen: What programs on television? Why agree to appear on those programs?

Prodromou: It helps me gain the trust of the community and be able to help their kids as a mental coach. I went to two well known programs on Cypriot TV. The clips are on my YouTube channel.

44. Jacobsen: On the “Prince Show,” is kissing a common Greek greeting between people – on either or both cheeks? In North America, this would be seen as odd between men. What was the reason for the invitation to the show? What was the main discussion topic? What were some responses to the show? Did you like the appearance?

Prodromou: I won the WGD Genius of the Year for Europe in 2017. The WGD made a press release and I got invited. 

45. Jacobsen: Was part of the purpose to garner the trust of the public?

Prodromou: I don’t like to advertise myself and the public believes anything the media tells them and the public adores celebrities so it was a win-win situation for me.

46. Jacobsen: On the “With Love Christina,” what was the reason for the invitation to the show? What was the main discussion topic? What were some responses to the show? Did you like the appearance?

Prodromou: Again winning the WGD Award.

47. Jacobsen: You seemed nervous in both appearances. Is this an accurate observation? If so, why? If not, why not?

Prodromou: I don’t socialize much. I was out of my water

48. Jacobsen: Do you desire or want to be a somebody rather than a “nobody”?

Prodromou: I’d rather be a nobody. In this earth to be a somebody you need to be a celebrity or have lots of money. I’d rather pass. Knowledge and Sophia for me is more important than money.

49. Jacobsen: Why are knowledge and Sophia sufficient for you?

Prodromou: That is why we are here. To learn and improve. 

50. Jacobsen: Why would most Greeks with an obsession on money choose money rather than their own notions of “knowledge and Sophia”?

Prodromou: They have not studied the occult like me. When you look into the abyss you find that it stares right back at you.

51. Jacobsen: What or who is Sophia (other than a middle name)?

Prodromou: The Goddess of wisdom. The most important figure for Gnostic Christians. 

52. Jacobsen: What kind of knowledge most appeals to personal sensibilities?

Prodromou: As long as it resonates with my intuition. I find it appealing. 

53. Jacobsen: What makes a real genius?

Prodromou: Finding the unknown.

54. Jacobsen: What makes a faux genius?

Prodromou: A good actor like Trump. 

55. Jacobsen: Are there more real geniuses or faux geniuses?

Prodromou: Faux Geniuses for sure. 

56. Jacobsen: What do you make of people who fake striving to be a nobody while being a somebody as their main goal to promote themselves or some idea rather than simply being a nobody, liking it, and preferring being a nobody?

Prodromou: We are all actors and the world is our stage. We have our plays and exits.

57. Jacobsen: What have been some work pursuits for you?

Prodromou: My passion is helping kids excel in sports through mental coaching. 

58. Jacobsen: What is “mental coaching”? What have been the specialities in the forms of mental coaching for you? How do you go about imparting these mental skills to mentees?

Prodromou: Helping the child make faster and better decisions under pressure. I have come up with several strategies depending on the learning style and personality of the child. One size does not fit all.

59. Jacobsen: What kind of pressure?

Prodromou: Playing in a competitive environment in front of people. Even the desire of pleasing our parents or coaches results in pressure.

60. Jacobsen: Fast is time-dependent, therefore relative. How much faster for most of the pupils?

Prodromou: One second too early and you are offside. One second too late and you missed your chance. Just as fast as is needed to made a difference.

61. Jacobsen: What are some of the basic strategies?

Prodromou: Improving focus and concentration. Teaching the kids how to pick up information and how to analyze it to make better decisions.

62. Jacobsen: What are some of the intermediate strategies?

Prodromou: Nothing is set in stone. What works for John doesn’t work for Charlie.

63. Jacobsen: What are the common, uncommon, and rare personality styles of the children?

Prodromou: Every kid is different. That is the beauty of this world.

64. Jacobsen: What intellectual issues impress you?

Prodromou: I am not easily impressed as only a small capacity of one’s brain is used. I believe that there is more to the world than meets the eye. We only see a tiny fraction of the spectrum after all.

65. Jacobsen: Which public and private intellectuals impress you?

Prodromou: I’m not easily impressed.

66. Jacobsen: What have been some educational attainments for you?

Prodromou: I graduated summa cum laude from the University of Indianapolis and finished the Master in Education program of the College of New Jersey with a perfect 4.00 GPA.

67. Jacobsen: What social philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: “The alienation of man thus appeared as the fundamental evil of capitalist society.” – Karl Marx

68. Jacobsen: What political philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: Equal rights and opportunities for all men and women.

69. Jacobsen: What economic philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: “Accumulation of wealth at one pole is at the same time accumulation of misery, agony of toil, slavery, ignorance, brutality, mental degradation at the opposite pole.” -Karl Marx

70. Jacobsen: Who is a favourite philosopher for you? I am sensing Marx or potentially Marx for some reason.

Prodromou: You are correct. 

71. Jacobsen: What religious/non-religious philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: I believe in God but I also believe that there can be no light without darkness. It is not about choosing sides. It is about finding balance.

72. Jacobsen: What is being balanced here? What delineates the light from the dark in personalities and life stances? For what it’s worth, I am reminded of the Grey Jedi.

Prodromou: You won’t see a bear turn the other cheek of her cubs are in danger.

73. Jacobsen: What kind of God makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: A God that is fair and just. That judges a person’s heart and his intentions rather than his accomplishments. 

74.Jacobsen: What is the argument for this God?

Prodromou: Synchronicity.

75. Jacobsen: What is the evidence for this God?

Prodromou: I find that I will always get to where I need to be through a random sequence of events in my life.

76. Jacobsen: What is in most people’s hearts?

Prodromou: Blood.

77. Jacobsen: What is fairness?

Prodromou: Having the same opportunities as everybody else.

78. Jacobsen: What is justice?

Prodromou: If you do somebody wrong that you also will be wronged.

79. Jacobsen: Is there a single term, even a neologism, covering the idea of fairness and justice in unison?

Prodromou: I’m not keen on unions.

80. Jacobsen: Do you believe in a supernatural order, a natural order, or both? Why?

Prodromou: I have had paranormal experiences but let’s leave it at that.

81. Jacobsen: As a detective, one must detect, investigate, and/or inquire – have to ask. What is the definition of paranormal, supernatural, metaphysical, and natural, material, and physical in this context?

Prodromou: Some things need to be seen. They cannot be described. For those that know no explanation is necessary. For those that don’t no explanation is possible.

82. Jacobsen: What is the precise meaning of the idea of a paranormal “experience” within the above-mentioned definition?

Prodromou: I refer you to the above. 

83. Jacobsen: Why does this experience within giving the precise experience, in fact, match the above-mentioned definitions and contextualizations of a paranormal experience rather than simply a natural and normal experience, or event?

Prodromou: I am still experiencing the effects up to this day. 

84. Jacobsen: What ethical philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: What is chaos for the fly is dinner time for the spider. 

85. Jacobsen: What worldview brings these together into a neat little package for you?

Prodromou: Thinking outside the box. Nothing is set in stone.

86. Jacobsen: How does the British background influence the personal perception of the Cypriot society?

Prodromou: Small is not always better.

87. Jacobsen: Why is inspiring kids important for you?

Prodromou: I had a tough childhood and know what it feels like to be alone in the world.

88. Jacobsen: How was it “tough”?

Prodromou: Parents were away most of the time and we had little money. I was also bullied in school.

89. Jacobsen: How did you feel alone? How did your mother cope knowing her rare child was alone and living a tough life?

Prodromou: She did the best that she could. I wouldn’t change her for any other mother.

90. Jacobsen: You are a member of “World Genius Directory, Prometheus, Mensa International, Epimetheus, GENIUS Umbrella Organization, sPIqr, Vertex, Grand IQ Society, Tetra, GOTHIQ, LEVIATHAN 160, Triple Nine Society, HELLIQ, The Glia Society, UBERIQ, TENIQ and many others.”

Prodromou: IQ is just a number but it looks good on my resume. It helps me as a mental coach as the parents are more willing to recruit me in order to help their kids.

91. Jacobsen: What societies seem the most reliable in providing a social and intellectual space over a long period of time for members?

Prodromou: Difficult to answer. I mostly join for the card and not the interaction.

92. Jacobsen: What one have you spent the most time interacting with if at all? Why that one?

Prodromou: WGD. I won the award and was their ambassador for a whole year.

93. Jacobsen: What is meant by becoming a person of a value versus becoming a person of success?

Prodromou: Success for many is having lots of money or social status. A person of value however is important to his community for his knowledge and not for his money. 

94. Jacobsen: Does this make value less fungible than money in some fundamental sense?

Prodromou: Only because most people are obsessed with money and not the pursuit of knowledge. In their defence it is a material world after all isn’t it?

95. Jacobsen: Was Madonna right, after all, but for everyone rather than just “girls”?

Prodromou: No money no honey.

96. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, what defines success? What defines value?

Prodromou: Success is different for many people. Value however is making an impact on your community.

97. Jacobsen: What are common notions of success amongst the Greeks other than making lots and lots of money?

Prodromou: Having a good job. Social status. 

98. Jacobsen: What kind of values must one have to make the “value” of “making an impact on your community”? How have you strived to be valuable to community in this manner? Is the sense of “community” local or global here, or simply a

Prodromou: Doing the best for the person that you are dealing with and not for you.

99. Jacobsen: An inference rather than a confirmation. You seem to like esotericism and symbology, including highly symmetrical and complex creations. If so, why? If not, why the complicated symbol systems on social media for you?

Prodromou: A lot of ancient and secret esoteric knowledge has been preserved in symbols. Language has changed and is different for everybody but symbols remain the same.

100. Jacobsen: Why take part in the Dudeist philosophy, as I am, full disclosure, a member too?

Prodromou: I like to be everywhere and am open-minded.

101. Jacobsen: For those who do not know, what is Dudeism?

Prodromou: The Tao. 

102. Jacobsen: How open-minded?

Prodromou: As much as it takes for my brain to fall out of my head.

103. Jacobsen: What other groups have you joined to be “everywhere”?

Prodromou: I can’t mention them as they are secret. 

104. Jacobsen: Any of those who aren’t secret, like the public alternative religious and philosophical groups, e.g., Dudeism?

Prodromou: I’m an Associate member of the American Psychological Association.

105. Jacobsen: What are some characteristics of the secret groups without precise details of them – other than being “secret”?

Prodromou: They find you. You don’t find them.

106. Jacobsen: You work or worked as a postal officer. Why?

Prodromou: The best and most stable job in Cyprus is as a civil servant. It also gives you lots of free hours in the afternoons to pursue other goals and interests. 

107. Jacobsen: I am reminded of old Bill Sidis working at ‘menial’ jobs while writing works on the history of the Americas, etc. Are you writing anything or working on some intellectual problem at this time?

Prodromou: I’m working on self improvement and my esoteric world through the application of hidden knowledge. You can add “mystery man” to the titles that I go under.

108. Jacobsen: Of the parts that are non-secretive and esoteric, what is the esoteric part? Is that Austin “Danger” Powers, man of mystery?

Prodromou: It is the part that “changes” you the most.

109. Jacobsen: What kind of self-improvement?

Prodromou: Receiving an upgrade. Making a better version of you. 

110. Jacobsen: What do you mean only a small capacity of the brain is used? Isn’t this an old and outmoded, i.e., non-empirical, stance akin to the 10% myth?

Prodromou: Only for those that have a large ego. It makes them feel better and that they are intelligent. Most of our thoughts are not even our own. 

111. Jacobsen: Why are more men in the high-IQ societies than the women?

Prodromou: I have the same question. Probably women have other interests as I don’t think it is about intelligence. 

112. Jacobsen: Who do you consider the smartest person in history?

Prodromou: Tesla. 

113. Jacobsen: Why?

Prodromou: He was a loner just like me. A pig of his work is not even known to the general population.

114. Jacobsen: Who do you consider some of the smartest people alive now?

Prodromou: Musk and Gates and even Trump.

115. Jacobsen: Why Musk?

Prodromou: He has a nice girlfriend. 

116. Jacobsen: Why Gates?

Prodromou: He started off with nothing and made billions through his knowledge.

117. Jacobsen: Why “even Trump”?

Prodromou: He is a good actor.

118. Jacobsen: What defines religion and theology?

Prodromou: A strong belief in something and faith in the unknown.

119. Jacobsen: What differentiates the former, a “strong belief,” from a conviction? Is faith a good or a bad thing if the thing is unknown or assumed as such? Many things have been believed on faith without evidence and caused a great many tragedies, and the ones/events/happenings/outcomes in which faith lead to good things; better and more evidenced reasons exist and highly probably existed.

Prodromou: I should have been dead in two car crashes that I have had. Faith is knowing that I’m still here for a reason. I guess it all depends on the person and his experiences.

120. Jacobsen: What is “ancient and secret esoteric knowledge”?

Prodromou: It wouldn’t be a secret if I told you now would it?

121. Jacobsen: What kinds of symbols preserve them?

Prodromou: Many symbols in the occult mainly. Especially those created by John Dee and Aleister Crowley.

122. Jacobsen: What are the main symbols? What are the main interpretations of them?

Prodromou: Again what I know cannot be discussed in public. It is up to every individual to seek the truth if he desires.

123. Jacobsen: Is the truth atheism or theism, or some other category?

Prodromou: The truth is still the truth even if nobody believes it. A lie is still a lie even if everybody believes it.

124. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on atheism?

Prodromou: Everybody has free will to believe or not. I respect their free will not to believe just as long as they respect my right to believe. 

125. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on theism?

Prodromou: Same as above. 

126. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on agnosticism?

Prodromou: Same as above.

127. Jacobsen: What have you mainly learned from purported secret esoteric knowledge?

Prodromou: That there is a purpose to life and not what everybody thinks it is. I have learnt why we are here. 

128. Jacobsen: What are some hints or indications as to the purpose of life?

Prodromou: Improving your inner world and DNA.

129. Jacobsen: What changes in life have come from this for you?

Prodromou: I have a whole new heart.

130. Jacobsen: Why did you pursue this course in life rather than others?

Prodromou: I believe everything else is a distraction.

131. Jacobsen: How do we know it’s ancient knowledge?

Prodromou: I have applied it and have seen the unseen. But you have to take my word for it as hard as that seems. 

132. Jacobsen: Does this not seem like a skirting, or circumnavigating the issue entirely, similar to the promise of unlikely rewards of 72 virgins after death for martyrs in some interpretations of Islamic scriptures – ‘just believe me as you’ll get it after you die, take my word for it’? This sort of argument from authority. What of those who simply cannot ‘take your word for it’ – no matter how hard it may seem – and require more robust responses, e.g., like detectives?

Prodromou: Even if I told you fee would believe. And even those that do believe won’t know how or what to do.

133. Jacobsen: What if what you saw was not the unseen and rather a hallucination or a mere chance coincidence rather than a real experience in true transaction with the external world – between the self and the natural world?

Prodromou: Again, I’m still experiencing the effects of my experience to this day. 

134. Jacobsen: How do we know it’s esoteric and secret rather than simply esoteric knowledge?

Prodromou: What I have seen I doubt many people have seen. 

135. Jacobsen: Does this seem unsatisfying and akin to a non-answer, almost a faux mysticism so as to skirt real explanation through properly verifiable and more reliable means than fallible human experience?

Prodromou: Some things are better left unsaid.

136. Jacobsen: Most Greeks are formal religious, as in Greek Orthodox Church. Why?

Prodromou: That is what they are brought up to believe. 

137. Jacobsen: Is it correct or incorrect as a system of thought, or more wrong or more rights as a theology?

Prodromou: Who am I to judge?

138. Jacobsen: How could this enforced and inertia-based belief in Greek Orthodox Christianity change in the future to a different faith or no faith at all?

Prodromou: I doubt it will change. Religion is strong in Greece and Cyprus and the church has a big role in Society and lots of money and property. The Head of the church can even influence the Government.

139. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, how does this color their image of the nature of world, human beings, and the relations of human beings to one another and the world?

Prodromou: Cultural bias is created that doesn’t allow much room to the individual to explore other ideas and values.

140. Jacobsen: What is creativity?

Prodromou: Tapping into your own intuition to come up with something original.

141. Jacobsen: What is intelligence?

Prodromou: Intuition for me is the highest intelligence. 

142. Jacobsen: Why intuition?

Prodromou: That is where the magic happens. 

143. Jacobsen: Is intuition truly a form of intelligence or more a subjectively formalized, experientially developed sensibility about life and its meanderings?

Prodromou: It is the highest intelligence.

144. Jacobsen: What is genius?

Prodromou: Finding X.

145. Jacobsen: What is purpose of having ancient esoteric secret knowledge in the first place?

Prodromou: “If you die before you die you won’t die when you die.” An ancient inscription written at Mount Athos.

146. Jacobsen: Any idea as to authorship of the inscription?

Prodromou: No idea. 

147. Jacobsen: Why is Mount Athos significant to the Greeks and to Eastern Orthodox monasticism?

Prodromou: It is their holy place. Everybody that is Greek has gone their or will eventually go there at least once in their life time.

148. Jacobsen: Is “ancient knowledge” good or bad? With current advancements, it sounds like “Ancient Grains” or some such thing.

Prodromou: That is the plan. To keep you away from the old. Who says new is better?

149. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on the freemasons in that regard – the society with secrets rather than a secret society?

Prodromou: I respect them although most are pawns and only a handful of those at the highest degrees reach the truth. 

150. Jacobsen: Why does the organization make most of them pawns?

Prodromou: To do their dirty work.

151. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on different Satanist or associated groups including The Church of Satan, First Satanic Church, The Satanic Temple, Luciferianism, Order of Nine Angles, or the Temple of Set?

Prodromou: I respect them as well; although, it is not good to be so fanatic. It does not leave room to explore other paths. Satan was once an angel after all.

152. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on The Church of Satan?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

153. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on First Satanic Church?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

154. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on The Satanic Temple?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

155. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on Luciferianism?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

156. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on Order of Nine Angles?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

157. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on the Temple of Set?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

158. Jacobsen: Do you believe in literal or metaphorical (or both) angels and demons? If so, how so? If not, why not?

Prodromou: Maybe they work together and are two parts of the same team.

159. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on Anton LaVey?

Prodromou: A genius but his work has been modified.

160. Jacobsen: Has his work been modified for better or for worse?

Prodromou: For the worse. 

161. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on Aleister Crowley or his self-claimed follower Timothy Leary?

Prodromou: Both geniuses although again they have been made out to be the worst possible people to keep society from exploring their work.

162. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on Anton LaVey?

Prodromou: I would have loved to have met him. 

163. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on the nature of good and evil? Does this relate to the aforementioned light and dark before, lightness and darkness before?

Prodromou: Good and evil change and are dependant on your circumstances and are in the eyes of the beholder. A cake is good comfort food unless you have diabetes. Bring those brownies next time you visit. It all depends upon where you are standing.

164. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on those who claim this is moral relativism (usually stated in a derogatory tone)? Where do you stand now, grey one?

Prodromou: I respect their right to believe what they like about the subject and hopefully they will respect mine. 

165. Jacobsen: What is science? What is philosophy? 

Prodromou: Science is when we prove something to be correct through “facts”. Philosophy on the other hand is your “idea” about something. My philosophy is that facts are important but intuition is more important. But you need to be sure it is your intuition talking before acting upon an impulse.

166. Jacobsen: What is a ‘fact’?

Prodromou: 1+1=2.

167. Jacobsen: What is an “idea”?

Prodromou: Something that hasn’t been proven yet to be a fact.

168. Jacobsen: Why does impulse lead to poor decisions?

Prodromou: Not always the case.

169. Jacobsen: What else could be “talking”? What means by which to differentiate intuition from other internal ‘talks’?

Prodromou: Our spirit guide.

170. Jacobsen: What if the Gospel of John alongside of the Synoptic Gospels, indeed the entirety of the Bible – Old Testament and New Testament, amount to fabricated documents or not entirely factual (as a hypothetical)? Now, most historians, secular and religious, agree Jesus Christ existed; however, all of the miracles, violations of the natural laws known today, and the fallibility of the human mind in terms of eyewitness testimony seem important to take into consideration, especially as all of the texts purport eyewitness testimony. Yet, Professor Elizabeth Loftus’s work is clear of the poor data-taking devices of human beings. In that, even if the Christian Scriptures are taken as holy, as inspired, and eyewitness testimonies, they’re still mediated by human sense perception and cogitation leading to the inevitable now-empirical conclusion of highly unreliable sources in eyewitness testimony within the field of cognitive psychology in regards to eyewitness testimony.

Prodromou: They are fabricated documents that have gone through many edits. Doesn’t mean there isn’t any truth to them. You just need to filter out the lies.

171. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, even if we take the explicit reference to the lightness and the darkness in Christian holy texts in a base textual analysis, or even in a detailed Logos oriented interpretation of the Gospel of John starting with John 1:1 to John 1:2 with “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God,” it’s not taken as literal, but as metaphorical. Why need the text to know this? Why have a holy text at all? Why not another fallible, questionable text without the sacred, inspired assertions behind it?

Prodromou: The bible is a story about two tribes.

172. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, what is gained by reference to a particular religious text coming from the ancient world in which philosophy was developed, but science, human rights, and so on, were not? Isn’t this simply outmoded and not needed anymore?

Prodromou: The bible tells us what has come before and what will come in the future. This year alone has been quite biblical for example.

173. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, how would one go unnoticed while leaving a significant trace in the context of a base textual analysis and in the detailed Gospel of John analysis? I am reminded of a Margaret Atwood quote, “I would like to be the air that inhabits you for a moment only. I would like to be that unnoticed and that necessary.”

Prodromou: Just by doing one’s job. The air doesn’t ask why it is there or asks for money to be there. It is invisible but without it humanity would not exist.

174. Jacobsen: What if intuition is simply a poor reasoning apparatus output of the human organism?

Prodromou: Again it depends on your ability to reason. What if our thoughts are nor our own?

175. Jacobsen: When we take some of the more important aspects of individual identity for some members of the profoundly gifted category or the profoundly high IQs, there seems a sense of the alone-ness, in which the individual gifted person’s temperaments and gifts leaves them in a straightjacket in some manner. On the one hand, they know more than most, max out standardized tests of valid types, and can process more quickly, more in-depth, and with greater relatedness in concepts. On the other hand, this sets them apart from ordinary society in a number of regards, which can make them out of sync emotionally and socially with peers due to lack of experience either due to innate factors or more time spent in independent study, or little overlap in ways of thinking for them. It is a sort of unresolvable pickle in the ways in which the species evolved. So, in some ways, tough, get used to it, while, on the other hand, how do these individuals find a place in society for some level of optimal fit for them? How have you dealt with this coming to terms with the world?

Prodromou: We are not pieces In a jigsaw puzzle. Some of us don’t need to fit in.

176. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, some will take a certain attitude of outright antagonism to the idea of coming to terms with the world exhibiting itself in opposition to standard sources of authority and structure and organization within the society, including established religions, governmental structures, and elders and experts within the society. This can take forms of delusions of grandeur, opposition defiance disorder, and simply taking the path of molasses all through life, which, naturally, comes with lifelong consequences for them. Any words of advice or guidance to younger members of the profoundly gifted cohort who could use some guidance in this regard?

Prodromou: Be your own person.

177. Jacobsen: For those parents with a profoundly gifted child, who can be ten years old while functioning at the intellectual capacity of a an average eighteen year old or more, what is some advice for them in terms of nutrition, fitness, and intellectual challenge?

Prodromou: Listen to the child and what he or she wants.

178. Jacobsen: When it comes to girl-girl time, boy-boy time, boy-girl time, what are some difficulties for some members of the profoundly gifted community who happen to exist in milieu of same-age peers and no peers intellectually, in a time of first finding lust and love while not having the requisite emotional maturity – even feeling intensely while lacking experience to buffer the intensity to socially and interpersonally appropriate levels?

Prodromou: This world is not ideal for everybody. It is a rich man’s world but I’d also say the better one looks the easier it is to fit in.

179. Jacobsen: How does 1-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 2-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Not very much.

180. Jacobsen: How does 2-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 3-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Again not very much. 

181. Jacobsen: How does 3-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 4-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Not very much.

182. Jacobsen: How does 4-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 5-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Not very much.

183. Jacobsen: How does 5-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 6-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Not very much. One sigma differences are insignificant. I doubt anybody can tell the difference between a 5 and 6 sigma dude just by chatting to them.

184. Jacobsen: How can societies emphasizing excellence more than equity cheer on and support the profoundly gifted and talented members of its communities?

Prodromou: Intelligence will always be repressed. Governments don’t like intelligent people that can think for themselves

185. Jacobsen: What do you consider some of the oldest secret societies?

Prodromou: The Knights Templars. 

186. Jacobsen: What seems like the general idea, while not stating the content, of many of the secret societies and the alternative theistic groups like the freemasons?

Prodromou: Self improvement and the quest for the holy grail.

187. Jacobsen: What annoys you?

Prodromou: People who think that they are always right and not open to new ideas.

188. Jacobsen: What makes you feel more at ease, at peace, with the world?

Prodromou: Not thinking about the world and not reading the media or watching TV. 

189. Jacobsen: Would you ever plan to move away from Greece-Cyprus-Turkey area back to the United Kingdom or some other place? If so, why? If not, why not?

Prodromou: I don’t plan my life. I am spontaneous and may take off one day.

190. Jacobsen: Most of the more intelligent people in history known have some – what I call – lifework. Some pursuit covering a large part of their lives, in spite of the chaos, nonsense, and personality quirks that may be part and parcel of the personality behind the lifework. Do you have a lifework? If so, what? If not, why not?

Prodromou: My pursuit was my inner world. Making a better version of me. No time for anything else. 

191. Jacobsen: How would you characterize the general life trajectory for you?

Prodromou: It’s hard to define.

191. Jacobsen: Where would you like your life to end up?

Prodromou: In the unknown garden of Nemo.

192. Jacobsen: What is metaphysics?

Prodromou: Why we are here.

193. Jacobsen: Why choose metaphysics from Dudeism?

Prodromou: Why we are here is a question that I have been trying to answer since I were a kid.

194. Jacobsen: Who do you consider the most creative person in history?

Prodromou: DA VINCI. 

195. Jacobsen: Who do you consider the best writer in history?

Prodromou: Shakespeare.

196. Jacobsen: What are the typical societal expectations of Greek heritage women? What are the typical societal expectations of Greek heritage men?

Prodromou: Getting married and finding a nice spouse.

197. Jacobsen: What are some cultural nuances largely known only to the Greeks about the ways in which men and women, old and young, blue-collar and white-collar, and so on, exist in Greek society, in Cypriot society, and in the diaspora with Greek heritage in terms of a sense of extended identity in the Greek people?

Prodromou: I’m not the best one to answer this question. I don’t socialize enough to know. 

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] 190+ S.D. 15 on the MACH, Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One) [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

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Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten”

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 2,935

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Karen Hines is the writer and director of All the Little Animals I Have Eaten. She discusses: background; All The Little Animals I Have Eaten; pieces brought together in this individual narrative to pass the Bechdel Test; a conversation between Margaret Atwood and Michelle Goldberg; one of the nightmares from the restaurant serving time; a second nightmare; and something to hope people not take away as a message from this play.

Keywords: All the Little Animals I Have Eaten, Bechdel Test, director, Karen Hines, Margaret Atwood, Michelle Goldberg, writer.

An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten”[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Of course, your background is more public as you are a reasonably prominent playwright. But for those who would like this in your own words, what is some background leading into being a playwright around more critical social commentary issues?

Karen Hines: I started off as a child actor. My first performing job was a pay that my great step-grandfather and “common law,” [Laughing] as he called himself, produced with his then independent theatre company. So, I got a taste for this. It was an adaptation of [did not get this]. I got a taste for independent theatre and left-leaning work. Then I began doing sketch comedy, improv, when I was in my late teens. Then in my early 20s, I became a member of the Second City comedy company. They present satire and parodies. They’re doing critiques of contemporary culture. I would say that I really got a sense of possibilities in that kind of work. I sculpted my studies around that kind of work. So, I studied clown and bouffon, but only so that I could further define what I was doing as a satirist, as a baby satirist. I studied lots of different things. I was originally a performer, then a performer-writer, then performer-writer-director as time went on. I got a taste for it. My parents are scientists and atheists. I suppose that I was brought up in a family that questioned. I have this grandmother who was an author. My great step-grandfather and common law was very experimental in the world of theatre. All of those influenced.

2. Jacobsen: With regards to the current production, All The Little Animals I Have Eaten, what was the starting point when some of the ideas were coming to the front of mind for you?

Hines: It began as something quite different than what it has become. It began as a exercise. I was interested in the Bechdel Test or the Bechdel-Wallace Test. I was interested in this kind of experiment in writing a bunch of disparate scenes that pass the test and what kind of feeling that might create in a room, having scenes that all pass the test. The play really began to evolve almost as soon as I started doing readings of it, or presenting pieces for grant applications or whatever, because the world began to change quickly. I guess, the earliest pieces that I wrote were in 2014. At that time, the Bechdel Test was  pretty unknown to a lot of people. It was a new territory and needed to explain this to people. Very soon after that, we had the MeToo movement and Donald Trump was elected into office. The world changed, and changed, and changed again. The Bechdel-Wallace Test seemed quaint by comparison. It was no longer weighty enough to hold the centre of a full-length play. Then I just began improvising. As a writer, you are trying to respond instinctively to what I was seeing in the world and not necessarily writing about those things. I do not write about the MeToo movement or abut Donald Trump. But as a writer, I was writing in a way that was responding to the world that we were in. The scenes are mostly about professionals and all-female, which makes sense when you remember this started as a playful examination or meditation including the Bechdel Test. But the world surrounding this condominium seemed much darker, much more inclusive of the changes. Everything feels a lot scarier since I began to write this play 6 years ago.

3. Jacobsen: When we look at some of the political contexts, it is quite a startling thing to see. It could be Hungary with Orban to Xi Jinping getting rid of term limits. There is a large contingent of political examples of strongmanism akin to Trump and almost to who Trump has almost given an excuse for and emboldened. There seems to be a trend in some feminist literature and writing in Canada to not necessarily write directly about those political and social occurrences. Rather, it is more portraying this more in a fictional setting, so Margaret Atwood is very famous for this, as we both know. Taking puzzle pieces of the real world in history, misogyny and so on, and then making a big puzzle out of it, then calling this The Handmaid’s Tale, and so on, were there pieces brought together in this individual narrative to pass the Bechdel Test, and then further weaved together?

Hines: Yes, initially, I had no idea how they were going to knit together. As I was working, I realized most of the scenes were set in a restaurant or a café, or a bistro. The ones that were not were very easy to change. That was probably partly because I was talking about conversations between women and overhearing conversations between people. Of course, there is no greater way to overhear conversations than to be a server.

Jacobsen: [Laughing].

Hines: I had been a server in my late teens and early twenties. I thought, “I don’t know what it is like to be 20-something now. I know 20-year-olds. I do not know what it is like to be a server.” That server character is sort of what ties things together now. Then I realized that I had to focus this further [Laughing] because people’s ideas around feminism are so fractured.

Jacobsen: Sure.

Hines: There’s no way to write a play set in a condominium and pretend to cover all version of females.

Jacobsen: [Laughing].

Hines: I decided that I would really focus it on an all-female condo with real estate being sold. I decided to really focus down on aspects of consumer culture, market driven feminism, capitalism, neo-liberalism, etc., and through a very distinctively female lens.

4. Jacobsen: I recall a conversation between Margaret Atwood and Michelle Goldberg off-the-top. Michelle Goldberg mentioned “feminism.” Margaret Atwood retorted, ‘We have to be careful about that term because it means about 50 different things now.’

Hines: Yes.

Jacobsen: When you mention the ‘fracturing’ of it, that’s what comes to mind. It is the idea that there are these various branches that fall under that rubric of feminism, but they are, as you note, “market driven feminism.” There’s a whole bunch of others. They are more or less allied, but they have different areas of emphasis. So, when you’re coming to this play presenting mostly or all women voices, but not the complete of women’s voices, of course, what is the idea of feminism that you’re bringing to mind here or hoping to bring to mind in the audience?

Hines: I am, certainly, going to piss some people off.

Jacobsen: [Laughing].

Hines: [Laughing] a lot of the women depicted in this play are not “good” women. They are women for whom individual gain is very important and getting ahead. They talk about accelerated feminism. What that means is very different from person to person, it is the tender server who walks among them and must decide whether she will accept or resist what she is seeing around her. Although, she wants her own place. She wants to succeed. She is confronted with people who are ostensibly succeeding. But [Laughing] the type of feminism that they are exuding is the all-for-me feminism [Laughing]. They are very much into the trappings of contemporary market driven feminism. They might want the leisure and things often marketed to women. These are often what they talk about. They are not lacking in poetry or intelligence. They just want what they want. I would say, “They are market driven feminists” [Laughing].

Jacobsen: When I hear that, the ideas that come to mind are a more comprehensive view or range of feminisms, or believing in different forms of feminism that are more or less allied with one another, but behaving in ways that are not necessarily feminist or reasonably accurate to that standard that many would accept – and what that shows is humanizing of women in that manner. I think Chris Rock had a saying. When black people in the United States can fail the way white people can fail, and bounce back the white people can, if they are hardworking enough and persistent enough, then that’s the more robust sign of equality.

Hines: Right.

Jacobsen: I think this instance of portraying women as human beings, as all sorts of the nobilities, the foibles, and the forgetfulness, the aging, the bad eyesight, the Machiavellianism to get ahead. All of these things. I think what you’re portraying is not the idea of feminism, but, maybe, a more honest representation of what feminism means as humanizing women as complete beings.

Hines: Yes and no, I go pretty hard on them. It is this server’s story, but it is a server’s nightmare. I don’t know if you have ever worked in a restaurant.

Jacobsen: I am working in one right now [Laughing] [Ed. This is before the SARS-CoV-2/Coronavirus/COVID-19 global pandemic, as declared by the World Health Organisation, leading to the shutting down of the restaurant, hopefully temporarily, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada at the moment, which comes from the national emergency declarations of the Federal Liberal Government of the Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau.]

Hines: I still have nightmares from my server years. I do recall nights as a server that were among the most stressful nights of my life. It is really tough when you are young and, obviously, if you are working in a decent restaurant; then, it is the best money. What it can take out of you is a lot, I focused on the darker aspects of that, the harder aspects of that. So, that it is, first of all, comedic, because if everyone is super nice to each other, then it is not funny. I instinctively went for the jugular on a type of woman or feminist. But it is a focus on a type of woman that is very human. But you should know that these are sort of surreal characters. They are not meant to represent all women or the darker side of women, but women in a place where the real estate is over $1,000 a square foot. They had to get there sometimes by not being the nicest people in the world. It is focused on this place. This place is imaginary. We talked about Margaret Atwood. It is not quite as extreme as The Handmaid’s Tale. It is its own strange place. Meanwhile, the condo that it is set in is called La Ferme. It is French for “The Farm.” It features live animals and living plants that ostensibly being raised and grown to eat. So, it has a beautiful aspect to it. The vegetation is gorgeous. Also, set against these problematic women are two women who share conversations with each other, which go back to the Bechdel Test, they are really beautiful conversations and fun conversations. Also, they are not about feminism or about men. In the case of this play, they are not about babies and families. They are about the world. I would say that those women are, if anything, the women people, hopefully, focus on the foreground against the background of these heinous women [Laughing].

Jacobsen: [Laughing].

Hines: Because these women are kind of counterculture. They are finding their way through this job. They are going to school. All of that. They are resisting. So, we have two extremes of women. The ones there are more of; they are the heinous variety with self-serving, greedy, money focused, materialistic, and so on, at the expense of others type women. Then there are these two women who really are interested in the world, in their future, in the future of what is outside of the confines of La Ferme.

5. Jacobsen: If I may ask, was one of the nightmares from the restaurant serving time in your 20s incorporated into the play? And if so, what?

Hines: Yes! [Laughing] even when I was still serving, and after, I used to have a dream that my section as in 4 different locations. For a while, that dream was in some restaurant building that I was actually working in, but the dream morphed. Sometimes, it was in a forest. My section was in a forest. I couldn’t see the tables, I think, maybe, that is how subconsciously the vegetation has become part of the scenography of the play. I also used to dream that my section was on several different subway platforms. I would have to jump on the subway to check on my other three sections. So, this server has, on this night, a section spread out over 4 distinct areas. Her fellow server has not shown up. She is on her own. She is dealing with tables all over the place. And she can’t see them all.

6. Jacobsen: Is there a second nightmare?

Hines: I would say that that nightmare of not being able to see my tables because of trees and, sometimes, subway platforms was the nightmare that kept happening over the years. I am trying to think. I think the nightmares, too, include, usually, the stress coming from the tables. The pressured situation with customers who are not necessarily all that kind, which is very common. I think that a lot of servers will tell you that they might get jobs in better restaurants, but, often, the clientele becomes more demanding and more unpleasant as you move to finer dining.

7. Jacobsen: So, my last question, then, would be: I can’t ask you, ‘What is the meaning of the title?’ That’s for people to figure out themselves. I am not going to ask you, ‘What should people take away from the story?’ Because that could be a million things. What I am going to ask you is the reverse of the last question, what do you hope people not take away as a message from this play?

Hines: Oh! I hope that they don’t think that I am telling them to be vegan.

Jacobsen: [Laughing].

Hines: [Laughing] I mean, one, I think it is a great thing to be. But it is not about that. It is not about Me Too or about Trump, as I said. It is about the word. Yes, it has, to me, a relationship to animals. But it is not as simple or straightforward as, “You should stop eating meat.”

8. Jacobsen: Thank you for the lovely conversation today, Karen.

Hines: Thank you very much, I really enjoyed the questions.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Writer and Director.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten” [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten”Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten”. In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten”.” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten”.” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten”In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten”In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten”.” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Karen Hines on “All the Little Animals I Have Eaten” [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hines.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 7,401

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Julien Garrett Arpin is a Member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: family background; the World Genius Directory; its positives and negatives; the Bible Belt background; Software Development and Network Engineering; differentiates Canadian society from American society; the award; the parenting style; the most honest moment in life; giftedness noted earlier in life; some of the intelligence tests taken; real IQ, authentic IQ, or true IQ; experience with peers and teachers in adolescence; the state of trust in the school faculties; a relevant gap in intelligence levels for sufficient communication with self-selected peers, friend groups, and mentors; the transition to university education; mundane, even trivial aspects of personal life; ADHD; some of the more exciting, novel, exhilarating, etc. parts of life; a chip on the shoulder and the narcissism in men; healthier, balanced sensibilities amongst the gifted; if a gifted person feels zero responsibility to utilize their gifts; a lifelong dream to some lifework or overarching life project; other organizations, groups, and resources; character traits; people internationally; Canadian personalities; some of the most creative people; the most cognitive horsepower in history; the Ashkenazim; the highest ethical standards and actual practices (word and deed) now; ethical duds; freethought; and revelation-based thinking failing or succeeding at this point.

Keywords: ADHD, Ashkenazim, giftedness, IQ, Julien Garrett Arpin, World Genius Directory.

An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Starting from some of the family backgrounds, what is it, e.g., culture, language, religion or none, geography, work, and educational attainments?

Julien Garrett Arpin: I was born in the northwestern corner of the state of Arkansas to English-speaking parents of humble beginnings in late August of 1995. My lineage is mainly French. Although my area falls within the Bible Belt of the US, my family was never particularly religious. I currently work as a software developer near Toronto, Canada, after finishing a 3-year program in Software Development and Network Engineering near here. It was during this 3-year period that I received the World Genius Directory’s 2017 Genius of the Year Award – America.

2. Jacobsen: For those who do not know, what is the World Genius Directory?

Arpin: It’s the current Who’s Who of the High-IQ World. The World Genius Directory was founded by a Dr Jason Betts, a member of Mensa Australia’s Administrative Committee. The WGD became an official member of the World Intelligence Network in August of 2012. The WGD’s motto is genius pro mundo, which is Latin for ‘genius for the world’It serves as a central point of organization in the high-IQ community as a means of bringing gifted adults together in ways that are good for the world. To help achieve this, the World Genius Directory holds annual elections for the Genius of the Year Awards. The winners are selected to serve as representatives for the gifted community. There are three GOTY Awards given each year; one to a member in the Americas, one to a member in Europe, and one to a member in Asia. Some of the smartest people on the planet are in the World Genius Directory.

3. Jacobsen: What are its positives and negatives?

Arpin: There are more positives than negatives where the WGD is concerned. The members are respectful. Determining which tests are of sufficient quality for consideration by the WGD poses the challenge. Dr Betts handles this well by investigating and cataloguing many IQ tests and IQ societies from across the web. Those resources are available from the WGD website. Like many members of the WGD, Dr Betts designs and offers a selection of surprisingly accurate IQ tests, especially when taken together. The site serves as a reference point for anyone looking for IQ tests. Listed members of the WGD get access to a Facebook page that is always lively. I’ve met amazing people through the WGD. I see some of them on TV, others breaking world records. The WGD also serves as a resource for companies or organizations seeking giftedness or IQ talent. The WGD has faced controversy for its connection to psychic research. The website’s URL is http://psiq.org/. I don’t mind. Research shows that intellectual and intuitive abilities go hand-in-hand. In total, the negatives consist of room to champion pseudoscience while the positives consist of all the social benefits offered to the world and gifted community by such a Directory.

4. Jacobsen: With the Bible Belt background, is a religion in some manner connected to family general views on the world now?

Arpin: My family remains decidedly unreligious but open. The prevailing monotheism such as the religion of the Bible promotes the patriarchal value structure that is integral to the traditional American family, so these factors impact parts of everyone’s lives within the society. Science is the best religion. Politics is a tumultuous one. These things all culminate into something strange in the Bible Belt, where people don’t believe that climate change or COVID-19 are real. These conservative values buoy the Christian faith and become part of it to many. The regular salvos of religious propaganda eventually fostered a tendency for me to recognize signs of cultishness. I support and appreciate the utility of virtue. I understand that our concept of virtuousness has roots in theology. Religion is an effective means of instantiating virtuousness but isn’t necessarily or always the best way. The psychology underlying religious acceptance has changed how I see the human condition and desire for connection and safety. The journey from mythology to science is the positive disintegration of human sociality.

5. Jacobsen: Why pursue Software Development and Network Engineering?

Arpin: I loved video games and computers but knew very little about them. My electrical experience made me interested in electronics. Computer programming sounded enticing. I also had some ideas for software projects that I could only pursue after learning how to code. One is an advanced SMS platform that brings computing power to text-messaging, thereby optimizing customer retention with smarter SMS ad campaigns. The platform also makes it possible for the general public to access the internet over SMS. The platform and business model earned 2nd place in a pitch competition. Beyond learning to write software for those ideas, the networking element put a body to the brain of code. All in all, the choice to pursue software was a decision I never knew I always knew I would make.

6. Jacobsen: What differentiates Canadian society from American society?

Arpin: Canadians are a few points higher in terms of Latitude and IQ. One-third of a standard deviation, according to recent instalments of the WAIS. Canadians outscore Americans so consistently that they use a separate norm here. I live in Toronto, one of the most diverse cities in the world. The change is refreshing. It’s a far cry from my Arkansan hometown where the majority of citizens were born in the Western Hemisphere and had little cultural dissemination. Canadians are a good bit more polite than Americans, and only slightly more polite than southern hospitality. Canadian friendships don’t seem to run as deeply, however. Many Canadians are great acquaintances, but neither enemies nor friends. It stands to reason that this lack of emotional investment in groupthink is the price for Canadian diversity in business.

7. Jacobsen: What does the award mean to you?

Arpin: Direction. It doesn’t make me feel like a genius, but a representative of the gifted community. The plaque reminds me of how I can make an impact with my limited time here. A symbol of the trust others place in me, my dedication to the gifted community. The gifted community gives me that sense of belonging and morale.

8. Jacobsen: What was the parenting style towards you?

Arpin: My parents were laissez-faire in their parenting style. They believed that they could only influence me so much as an individual and that I would, ultimately, be the one making my own decisions in life. And so, the best they could hope to do was to teach me the fundamental principles that they had learned. They were supportive of my accomplishments and encouraged me to become a self-sustained adult, above all else. They taught me to balance compassion and logic and to think for myself. My parents were always honest with me and motivated me to do well in life.

9. Jacobsen: What was the most honest moment in life from them for you?

Arpin: Well, the truth hurts, so their most honest moment was probably a bitter wake-up call. Life is challenging at times, even for our parents. Their most honest moment was the one in which they revealed themselves as flawed, and told me for the first time that they would never be perfect. Their honesty opened my eyes so that I could begin the process of overcoming my childish naivety. The desire for the easy way out, to place complete faith in an archetypal parental figure in hopes of validating the inner experience is the force that leads to blind trust in authority and dogmatism. The ugliest moments are usually the best learning opportunities.

10. Jacobsen: Was giftedness noted earlier in life, or not? How was this nurtured, or not?

Arpin: Certain signs were present from early on. An aunt tells me that when I was extremely young, just a baby in the cradle, she came to see what I looked like for the first time, and made a joke that I looked like Yoda in all my fleshy, newly born appearance. Her words seemed to ring true as everyone in the room began to laugh, but then they all stopped laughing and looked at me in shock when they realized that I was crying because they were all laughing at me. She said that I somehow understood that they were all making fun of me, and I wouldn’t look at her for a while. The fact that she recognized that and acted accordingly was pretty nurturing. My parents are unsure when I learned how to read and write. I had the reading comprehension of a sophomore-level university student in third grade. I won a competition in the library for guessing the number of jelly-beans in an extra-large pickle jar that year. At about the same time, my class was administering timed multiplication tests consisting of 80 to 100 problems that students were to complete in under 2 minutes. To encourage effort, the school promised every student that received perfect scores on all timed tests ice cream at the end of the semester. I was the only student to eat ice cream when the time came. It felt horrible. In fourth grade, I won a district spelling bee against junior high schoolers. My parents also divorced when I was in fourth grade. I moved to a new school district in fifth grade and was placed in a gifted program there in sixth grade. The gifted program was incredible for me. It put me with kids that seemed to understand me, and I forged friendships there that hold to this day.

11. Jacobsen: What have been some of the intelligence tests taken by you? What have been some of the scores, and what were their standard deviations? What would be the relative cognitive rarity for you?

Arpin: I have taken many cognitive ability tests of many different types. I generally refer to my IQ as 154 with 15-point standard deviations, which would put me at a relative rarity of about one person in every 6,284. I scored 154 on the Wonderlic Personnel Test, and 154 on the entrance test to the International Society for Philosophical Enquiry. However, my scores have reached as high as the 170s. I scored 5.06 sigmas above the sample mean (IQ 175) on the MITRE/Educational Testing Services Inductive Reasoning Battery for a High Ability Population, Figure Series, Form 1. I also scored 170 on the test RADIUS by Hans Sjoberg. I scored at the 99.99th percentile of the population on a quiz of social psychological skills from Yale University without a formal background in psychology, which means I have a sense for social patterns. Research indicates that those abilities correlate with general intelligence. I also achieved ceiling scores on multiple intelligence tests from the Psychometrics Centre at Cambridge University. I scored 145+ on IQ tests from various universities including the Hagen Matrices Tests from Hagen University, ICAR 60 from Northwestern University, and the MV2G from SRH University of Applied Science Heidelberg. I have a few more niche scores, as well. On Hawk-Eye, a test of visual processing speed by Dr Micheal Merzenich, PhD, I scored at the ceiling of the test with a visual processing speed below 76 milliseconds. I scored at the 100th percentile on the Verbal Memory Test from Human Benchmark after memorizing around 220 words. I correctly guessed 14 randomly generated coin-flips in a row during a proctored Binary Intuition Test for the group Trishula, a member society of Elysian Fields. The source of randomness for that test was the TRNG or True Random Number Generator at random.org based on atmospheric white noise.

12. Jacobsen: What seems like the real IQ, authentic IQ, or true IQ, for you?

Arpin: 154. Exact IQ scores are somewhat fallacious. Even if I somehow extracted a perfect measure of my IQ to the hundredth of a point, it would fluctuate within seconds. Overall, my IQ scores cluster near the 145-160 range. I consider my IQ to be 154.

13. Jacobsen: How was your experience with peers and teachers in adolescence?

Arpin: My experience with peers and teachers was somewhat challenging during that period of my life. In high school, I often ate lunch alone after selling food to other kids more cheaply than the school was offering it. Some of my old friends, many from the gifted program, would pass by and say hello, so I always knew that I had a few close friends. But I always perceived a disconnect from the general student body. I quit the gifted program in 8th grade because the program instructor had recently transferred from teaching students much younger than I was. Also, my woodshop teacher was punishing me for my time spent in the gifted program instead of his class. My peers had a nasty track record where I was concerned. Once, in high school, I was the only person with an answer to a question during a test review. The teacher was out of the room, and someone openly asked the classroom what the answer to that question was. I thought I could help, so I shared my thoughts, but then nearly every member of the class turned around in their seats and called me an idiot for having that answer! And my answer was right! Fairly perplexing. The next day, the teacher managed to overlook me while taking attendance even though I was there. It didn’t make me feel respected or recognized. It reminded me of my teachers in middle school that would get fed up with my questions. Early into high school, someone from the school football team began belittling me in front of the class. I knew that my peers would have continued the downward spiral and made my life hell if left unchecked. So, I used my knowledge of social patterns to rally a group of students behind me, and we caught the bully between classes. It worked out in my favour. That campaign earned me new friends and peace of mind until graduation. From then on, I had very little faith in school faculty. I would ask questions and receive empty answers. Soon, I stopped participating in some classes entirely. The teachers weren’t sure what to do with me as my standardized test scores were the highest in the courses that I wasn’t attending. At age 14, I discovered an art form that garnered some recognition in my neighbourhood and school: lyricism. I developed skills in lyricism to secure a place in the social hierarchy, and as a means of personal expression. My peers became more accepting of me after I began writing rhymes. I never understood that giftedness was the reason that I felt disconnected from them.

14. Jacobsen: What is the state of trust in the school faculties now?

Arpin: I think that academia is finally recognizing its issues, so I have hope for the not-so-distant future. According to many sources, the intellectual quality of academic institutions began to plummet in 2014. Some never-before-seen wave of cognitive and ethical famine struck American universities in the form of cancel culture and girls-only safe spaces. Suddenly professors could do things they’ve always done and get dogpiled by triggered students. As legislative restrictions increased, the university gates became less selective. So every year, less qualified students enter less enriching learning environments under the halfhearted tutelage of increasingly defensive professors. For many students, the lack of that nourishing environment is reason alone not to waste money on bus tickets to class. It becomes more economic to simply skip class, teach themselves everything they need to know from YouTube and only set foot on campus for midterms and final exams. Academia has withstood heavy blows in light of recent trends, but it will redeem itself soon enough.

15. Jacobsen: What seems like a relevant gap in intelligence levels for sufficient communication with self-selected peers, friend groups, and mentors?

Arpin: It is subjective, but maybe I can represent my thoughts in an objectively meaningful way. It seems that intelligence differences over 1.5 standard deviations in size present challenges to communication. In my personal opinion, a common interest extends this communication range to 3 sigmas, with each additional shared interest extending it by about half as much as the previous iteration. A rough example could go as follows. Imagine an average adult having a conversation with an equally average child. Unless the child is almost an adult, there probably won’t be much fulfiling conversation taking place. Their brains and internal languages are too different. But now imagine that the adult and child have a common interest, like a sport. What if the adult is the kid’s football coach? Suddenly, the two of them can see eye to eye in many ways, speaking in external terms, as men united by a common goal. So, I would answer your question in terms of magnitudes of intelligence differences and personal similarities.

16. Jacobsen: How was the transition to university education?

Arpin: It would be an understatement to say that I was looking forward to the me-time following high school graduation. After finishing 12th grade, I took some time off. I became an electrician for a year. After that, I worked a few odd jobs in charitable organizations until I decided to attend college to become a software developer. Three years had passed since my high school graduation, and I was happy to have taken the opportunity to mature and decide what I wanted in life. I picked software development because I knew nothing about it, and I wanted to pursue something challenging. Met with course material I found stimulating, I began to rediscover my giftedness during college. The college experience was transformational for me. My classmates in college were friendlier to communicate with than in high school. Finishing my exams in a few minutes never made me feel guilty in college! My college professors still didn’t always understand my questions or give good enough answers, but it was much better than high school.

17. Jacobsen: What have been some rather mundane, even trivial aspects of personal life for you

Arpin: The taste of toothpaste has always bothered me, but I grin through it for my coworkers. The orderliness of chores has the air of artistic expression rather than a functional requirement. Having never particularly enjoyed colouring or drawing, I find little satisfaction in arbitrary house-chores. Ceaseless swapping of spatial position is a cheap distraction from what matters. In my opinion, the form should always follow the function. Things like doing the dishes seem like nothing more than time-consuming meditative practices. I can merely purchase plastic dinnerware or purchase food items that don’t require many dishes. Consider the fact that using a drinking glass is obsolete compared to drinking from water fountains. You create cross-contamination every time you drink water that has touched the inside of a glass. More suitable to cut out the middle-man and drink the water as it falls from the faucet. These sorts of daily processes that could be optimized or reduced are my bane. I have ADHD and find the tedium of paperwork insufferable. I need to clear out my email inbox, for that matter.

18. Jacobsen: When was ADHD diagnosed? This is common for boys and men, far more than girls and women.

Arpin: In 12th grade. Retrospectively, it probably would have helped to be diagnosed sooner. Giftedness and ADHD can conceal one another. Oh well, I’m just happy that I found out about it before I graduated from high school.

19. Jacobsen: What have been some of the more exciting, novel, exhilarating, etc. parts of life for you?

Arpin: The intensity of my personal experience leaves me in awe of the beauty of existence. Our universe hangs in perfect harmony. Even a simple juxtaposition of sticks can teach us about balance and identity, and these learnings excite me. I’m a hyperphantasic HSP. I have a vivid mind’s eye, a mental space where I can imagine and experience. This characteristic helps me anticipate and prepare for the road ahead. Impactful music can invoke rapture within me. I actively pursue euphoric moments. I find fringe research that probes the limitations of knowledge to be among the most fulfilling uses of time. Nothing electrifies my being like learning something that forces me to rethink everything I think I know, and the frontiers of science tend to do that. I enjoy researching things like natural science, consciousness, reality, number theory, identity, and everything in between. The mystical experience has highlighted my time on Earth.

20. Jacobsen: Some gifted individuals develop a chip on their shoulder based on particular senses of entitlement in life because of their innate gifts and, therefore, the internalized idea of natural rights, deserved status, and place in society because of the gifts, even unique talents or character qualities, of them. Some may develop a lifelong chip on their shoulder towards well-established academic institutions, to the workaday world, to socialization, to the intimacy of any form, or to building a mature legacy to pass down in progeny or productions. Men are more probable to develop narcissism than women. I observe this in some sub-demographics of the male gifted population. Why is this the case, in both cases of a chip on the shoulder and the narcissism in men?

Arpin: The answer is simple, though perhaps less cheerful than you might hope. The reason this happens as a natural process is because it is the natural order. The gifted have always been persecuted, bullied, burned as witches, or shoved into lockers. Admitting that a superior capability exists without understanding the nature of its advantage will raise the alarms of most people. The less intelligent members of any group that relies on intelligence to wage war and survive will feel threatened by their more intelligent contemporaries. Even after the intelligent one does everything they can to help society, this will be the case. Oh, a clever inventor invented a streetlight to bring light to a dark world? No thanks, it will be called the devil’s candle, and they might meet the same fate as Galileo. Things seemingly changed on the surface level after the gifted community provided technology to the world in the form of computers and internet access. Gifted individuals are exploited for their abilities, treated as expensive assets, just to be deserted, denied, and detested by their brothers. I was seven the first time I saw Bill Gates called the antichrist on a Windows PC. Bill Gates could give away billions of dollars and reconstruct his entire life mission to reduce poverty and death in the third world. He would be blamed for their deaths. He could even warn us of upcoming pandemics, and the world would blame him once it arrived. Time to fetch the pitch-forks. Western culture rewards narcissism with social affluence and romantic opportunities. To be frighteningly smart and nice appears threatening and obsequious. As such, a chip on the shoulder in the gifted male is rarely a result of unfounded narcissism. These responses are war strategies and often necessary. Studies indicate that most school shooters in America are gifted students. Is it narcissism that leads these students to seek revenge? Not necessarily. So why wouldn’t the gifted individual be interested in passing on their good works and strengths to future generations? Well, the reality is your progeny and productions are the capital that will ultimately be criminalized by our selfish and destructive military-industrial complex built to subsidize the farthest reaches of the world to underpin the development of our society. Given this, there should be little question about why many abnormally intelligent individuals develop a chip on their shoulder towards society. Many choose not to contribute out of self-defence. Narcissism often gets misdiagnosed in gifted individuals.

21. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, how can we help develop healthier, balanced sensibilities amongst the gifted who may be on a negative life trajectory due to internal factors rather than some of the external factors some may observe with Bill Sidis and others?

Arpin: Gifted children develop asynchronously, or at different rates than other children in certain areas. That’s why gifted education programs are so essential for them. Human beings are social animals that require connection to thrive. Without peer groups, gifted individuals often miss out on the reciprocation they need to develop to their fullest potential. Forcing a child to attend a school they find mediocre, threatening, or uncaring isn’t healthy for them. Their developmental trajectories must be accepted and nurtured. Academic institutions have to increase the attention they give gifted education. Lack of knowledge on behalf of educators is no excuse. Ignorance of giftedness from parents is no excuse, either. Parents should always be held accountable for nurturing their children with special needs, and gifted children are considered by many to be a special needs group. All families of gifted children should be familiar with Dabrowski’s Overexcitabilties. For those that may not know, Polish psychologist Kazimierz Dabrowski developed a theory called the Theory of Positive Disintegration that was adopted by the gifted community after its tenets seemed applicable to the group. It posits that only through facing struggles and surviving can we encounter the circumstances that teach us what it means to be better than we are. The five overexcitabilities of the gifted are intellectual, imaginational, emotional, sensual, and psychomotor. Most gifted children have at least one of the OEs, and many have more than one. These overexcitabilities alter or intensify the experiences of intellectually gifted children in ways that are qualitatively different from the norm. Unrecognized, these overexcitabilities can lead to misunderstanding, misbehaviour, and misdiagnosis. We neglect the gifted child every time we downplay their experience or minimize how they feel, and so we must learn to be more accepting of their sensitivities. Teach the gifted child what it means to be gifted. Never leave the child room to wonder why they feel so different from their classmates lest they blame themselves. Show them that capability brings responsibility and what responsibility means. Let them gravitate to their natural domains so that they can identify their strengths and then apply them to other areas. Give them the freedom to express their capabilities and insights, and you will see incredible things. Help them find meaning whenever they ask you for it. Unite them with others like them so that they can connect and grow within a peer group. The world will challenge the gifted child, that much is certain. We must protect the gifted children. We must teach them strength, patience, and compassion. It’s our responsibility to lead by example as we build environments that cultivate these ideals. That means being willing to move the gifted children into a more advanced or appropriate classroom if that’s what it takes to keep them engaged and on track.

22. Jacobsen: What if a gifted person feels zero responsibility to utilize their gifts?

Arpin: Responsibility is a human experience. You cannot survive without being responsible enough to acquire sustenance. With that in mind, what could cause such a hangup where one would choose to stop eating? An unutilized gift isn’t necessarily a wasted chance just like movement for movement’s sake doesn’t necessarily get you anywhere. Maybe such an individual grew to detest their gift after it caused trouble for them. So, they stopped contributing that side of themselves and let it sink into ambivalence. Perhaps they refuse to be exploited in that particular way but are happy to help in others. Or maybe they are depressed, in which case, there are more pertinent problems than their questionable inclinations, like making sure they have a reason to go on living. The question isn’t really about which utilities someone should feel most inclined to use, or when, but what they hope to use them on. Is this a rejection of the self for the sake of others, or of others for the self? Are these choices involuntary reflexes or conscious boycotts? The reflex requires external help in the form of empathy and time to help the gifted individual heal from the trauma that caused them to deny their gifts. Voluntary rejection doesn’t need any external justification or assistance. A human being is free to abstain from that which disturbs it. These individuals will likely seek some other means of chemical fulfilment since their active minds won’t have responsibility-powered reward chemicals in ready supply. Acting responsibly, especially with others to create a sense of group belonging, is hard-wired into the human psyche as a source of happiness.

23. Jacobsen: Have you had a lifelong dream to some lifework or overarching life project?

Arpin: My goal is and has been to facilitate a dynamic through which I can enhance society through the nurturance and enrichment of the gifted population. The WGD has made this possible, but there is still much to be done. We are in a position to provide resources that every family with internet access can use to identify and nurture giftedness in their own homes and communities. These gifted children will be the ones to invent the solutions to the pollution and environmental toxins left behind by the military-industrial complex. I’m grateful to work with organizations such as the World Genius Directory, Elysian Fields, and leaders in the field of giftedness from all around the world to accomplish this.

24. Jacobsen: What other organizations, groups, and resources exist to provide some backing and support, and community, for the gifted young – and the general gifted population?

Arpin: There are many IQ societies designed for various levels of giftedness. Some of the classic names include Mensa, Intertel, the International Society for Philosophical Enquiry, the Triple Nine Society, the Prometheus Society, and the Mega Society. Mensa has special interest groups that focus on gifted kids. For families, other organizations include the National Association for Gifted Children (www.nagc.org), Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted (www.sengifted.org), Educations for the Gifted Organization (www.edgo.ca), and Hoagie’s Gifted Education Page (www.hoagiesgifted.org).

25. Jacobsen: What character traits in people impress you?

Arpin: Awareness, honesty, compassion, empathy, originality, ingenuity, intelligence, diligence, courage, patience, wisdom, charisma, and consistency are rather impressive to me. All of the strengths listed in the VIA Strengths Finder. Willingness to question one’s own beliefs is priceless.

26. Jacobsen: What people internationally impress you?

Arpin: Lately, I’ve been thinking about the Nigerians. Despite incredible odds, they continue to strive for excellence and to improve conditions for their nation and people. Nigerians are the best-educated national group in the United States. Of all Nigerians in the US, nearly 20% hold Master’s degrees. A stark contrast to the almost 30% of Nigerians that are currently considered illiterate in their country. Nigeria is still working to improve educational conditions after declaring independence from Great Britain in 1960. It’s been a steady march. Nigeria recently eradicated polio from their country with the help of the Gates Foundation. And that wasn’t long after overcoming the Ebola outbreak. Nigeria now has the largest economy in Africa. The country has a spin on Hollywood called Nollywood, which is the third-largest film industry in the world and pumps out four dozen movies each week. The Nigerian work ethic and sense of culture culminate into something inspirational. Nigerians lead by example and leave a hopeful mark in the world.

27. Jacobsen: What Canadian personalities impress you?

Arpin:  I have a lot of respect for Jordan Peterson from the University of Toronto and Patricia Susan Jackson or P. Susan Jackson from the Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted. They both raise awareness of giftedness to help the current generation improve circumstances for the upcoming generations. I’d be willing to bet they’re both gifted themselves, too. Peterson is a professor of Psychology that gained a lot of attention for his refusal to adhere to shifting political tides in academia. Peterson’s willingness to discuss the realities of IQ has opened millions of eyes to the situation of intellectual giftedness and intellectual disability. P. Susan Jackson is a psychotherapist and advocate for gifted youth. She founded the Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted as a clinic for psychotherapy and research of exceptionally gifted children. She also travels and speaks to schools and associations on how to recognize and foster giftedness. These individuals go the distance and fight for what they believe. I’m happy to see them succeed because they also fight for what I believe.

28. Jacobsen: Who are some of the most creative people that you have known?

Arpin: As a software developer working in the labs of the leading banks in Canada, I meet programmers that blow my mind with what they can create. Be it some graphical design, animation for a webpage, an algorithm for a database, or a new puzzle game for your smartphone, they can do it. Software engineers are more creative than people think. They’re creative enough to create ways to keep creating.

29. Jacobsen: Who are the people whom you consider to have the most cognitive horsepower in history?

Arpin: By statistical and historical standards, the Ashkenazi Jews seem to have the most cognitive horsepower of any ethnic group. In terms of singular individuals, mathematical thinkers such as Newton, Einstein, Euler, Gödel, von Neumann, and others come to mind. In terms of nations, I would give the United States and China credit for amassing the most cognitive horsepower to achieve their goals.

30. Jacobsen: Why the Ashkenazim? Is this on verbal intelligence, on general intelligence, or both?

Arpin: I was referring to their above-average general IQ scores, which are strongly influenced by their verbal and mathematical prowess. If the average IQ is 100, the average Ashkenazi IQ is around 112. That means the average Ashkenazi Jew will score higher on intelligence tests than 81% of the population. These findings are well known. Verbal intelligence has a kind of cumulative effect whose advantage shifts with circumstances and grows more refined over time. The Ashkenazi Jews are perhaps the embodiment of intellectual persecution, where much antisemitism was born from jealousy of Jewish success in commerce and politics. With verbal intelligence being their forte, the Ashkenazi Jews are skilled at naming things. It’s almost like some God created them to name all the living things on Earth. But all jokes aside, they seem to be leading the proverbial pack.

31. Jacobsen: Who are the people whom you consider to have the highest ethical standards and actual practices (word and deed) now?

Arpin: The most ethical individuals are those that kindle the flames of critical thought and compassion in others. Those that challenge their own biases and readily admit their mistakes in hopes of becoming wiser are usually the ones with the responsibility to make the hard decisions. The network effect of the modern world gives each idea the potential to become a revolutionary ideology. Given our increasing population size, societal complexity, and technological interconnectivity, the wise teacher is more than a pillar of society but a foundation for the future. I could name mainstream intellectuals, provocateurs, and thinkers known for challenging the status quo. These thinkers are rising in popularity because their ethical value is becoming increasingly self-evident. Reaching a sufficient level of influence will lead ethical individuals to divert focus away from their initial strategies to give back to the community. Examples of this include billionaires-turned-philanthropists like Bill Gates and Jack Ma. Those of the highest ethical substance make sacrifices for the greater good after putting in the work to make sure they have something worth offering.

32. Jacobsen: Who are ethical duds – all show, no substance?

Arpin: Emotionally Volatile, Ideological Leftists. These people claim to value individuality and difference of opinion, yet would stone us to death at the mention of mere scientific facts. That is a paramount ethical failure. These false prophets belong in mental hospitals. Emotionally Volatile, Ideological Leftists are so incompetent that they can’t even bring themselves to complete a Google search as a means of checking whether the next statue on the anti-racism disassembly line is of an abolitionist or a civil rights activist. This left is hysterical, bloodthirsty, illogical, and hell-bent on revenge for the horrors of life. The truth is that I’m politically left-leaning, yet I find myself inching ever so slightly to the right with every newsreel of a violent mob fighting the fool’s fight. I like to say that I left the left for the right only to right the right, for the left. We have to fix these problems ourselves. Sadly, some are too far gone to open their ears to the fact that there are truths on all sides. But alas, patience is golden.

33. Jacobsen: When you reflect on the types of philosophies out there, whether supernaturalistic and revelation-based philosophies found in various religions and theologies, naturalistic in the freethinker and natural philosophies or some variations of spirituality-by-practice without formalization in a religious codification or operation within the considerations of modern empiricism?

Arpin: That depends on what problems you hope to solve. The utility of a school of thought exists in its ability to solve distinct problems. The epistemology of freethought is the inherent mechanism by which human beings can adapt to change by overcoming and learning from challenges. But there is a price. Freethought encourages individualism, and being a lone individual in any arena can pose a risk. As such, the legacy of freethought is the expansion of science through trial-and-error, and then social forces propagate the results throughout the larger collective. This process only works when the virtues and proponents of freethought are encouraged and protected on a societal level. Inversely, spirituality-by-practice serves an effective means of training a population to work in unison. The process is Pavlovian. An army united under morale strikes with many times the force. In many senses, it doesn’t matter what lies they believe so long as they strike hard enough. Synchronized movement enhances group cooperation, and so many religions and corporations require their practitioners to engage in coordinated rituals as a team-building exercise. Revelation-based philosophies are the result of spirituality-by-practice attempting to grapple with change without losing sight of some leading tenet of morale. Freethought is the most objective and appropriate philosophical framework for current circumstances.

34. Jacobsen: What else follows from freethought?

Arpin: Logical models of the all. Freethought is an infinitely expanding process where each answer brings questions. Where does it end? At the boundary of perception and logic. When the understanding of reality becomes so nuanced that there is nothing new to ask, then dogma and revelation-based thinking will rise to preserve the status quo until more questions present themselves. The continuous output of freethought is the sciences, but stagnating sciences rot and turn to dogmatic beliefs.

35. Jacobsen: Is revelation-based thinking failing or succeeding at this point?

Arpin: Succeeding. It’s becoming more common in the public forum as scientific knowledge becomes a beacon of class privilege, turning the people against science. Supernaturalistic beliefs are cheap, and the only thing many fanatics can afford. So, as time progresses, revelation-based thinking breeds revolutionaries that seek to dismantle the boards of freethinking rationalism on their spurious eureka moments. I’ll call them revelationaries. The world is growing narcissistic, more emotional, and less intelligent due in large part to social forces like social media. These echo chambers feed confirmation bias in ways we’ve never seen. Combine this with an age of misinformation where you can find a supporting study for any claim. What you get are the roiling makings of an ideological Crock-Pot. Now, empowered by false narratives and lazy research, household revelationaries are losing patience with the rationalist narrative. At worst, they consider lengthy justifications and proofs as time-consuming trivialities or outright attacks against them. Such accusations aren’t the product of logic and reason, those fair instruments of discourse and debate, but dogma and hysteria. At best, they develop new pseudosciences that they hope to imbue with some sense of economic value that they can profit off. Those without the psychospiritual resources to stand steadfast against the torrent of falsehoods will fall to the confusing storm. There will always be the people that turn to their irrational revelations for the answers. Flat-Earthers. Climate change deniers. IQ deniers. All symptoms of a grander process as integral to human nature as cognitive dissonance. So, yes, revelation-based thinking is on the upsurge in the form of science denialism.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Julien Garrett Arpin on Canada, America, Intelligence, ADHD, and Impressive Figures (Part One) [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/arpin-one.

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© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 3,233

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Mhedi Banafshei is a Member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: family background; the emphasis on the political nature; religion in Iran and in the UK; values of “education, secularism, and ambition”; a sense of an extended self or a sense of the family legacy; sociology; religion; professional lives of brothers; the juxtaposition of religiosity and secularism for mom and dad; particular denomination of religion; the long-term future of religion in the 21st century; the experience with peers and schoolmates as a child and an adolescent; an agreeable disposition; homosexuality; purpose of intelligence tests; high intelligence; peers who were around the same intellectual level; the ways in which the geniuses of have either been mocked, vilified, and condemned if not killed, or praised, flattered, platformed, and revered; the greatest geniuses in history; great living geniuses; the profoundly gifted; differentiation of a genius from a profoundly intelligent person; talent gone to the garbage heap; some work experiences and educational certifications; business adventure; some of the more important aspects of the idea of the gifted and geniuses; some social and political views; more on social and political perspectives; the God concept or gods idea and philosophy, theology, and religion; science; tests taken and scores earned (with standard deviations); and ethical philosophy.

Keywords: background, geniuses, IQ, Islam, Mhedi Banafshei, religion, Shia Islam.

An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What was family background, e.g., geography, culture, language, and religion or lack thereof?

Mhedi Banafshei: Both of my parents are native Iranians, and I’m the oldest of three brothers born in the UK. My parents, particularly my father, have always been quite strictly religious despite embracing the secularism of society. My father attained a master’s degree in sociology, which made him an interesting man of combined education and religiosity. Overall, I believe being a product of both British and traditional Iranian culture of religious conservatism has been valuable in terms of gaining a broader understanding of various human cultures and concepts. Having to sometimes deal with the contrasting elements of the aforementioned has made it easier for me to develop the ability to see the different sides of issues. 

2. Jacobsen: Why the emphasis on the political nature?

Banafshei: My father was a supporter of the government of Shah and was quite displeased about the Islamic revolution as he considers the successive regime to be a force of injustice and violent oppression. In terms of the UK, he has often communicated historical anxieties in terms of feeling uncertain about his place in the country and his belief that he has struggled to get an appropriate position in his field due to institutional discrimination of ethnicity and religion.  Growing up, I remember being told that in order to avoid problems of a similar nature, I should be a leading example of correctness within all educational, social and professional structures I participate in, lest I risk being unsuccessful for being perceived as an imperfect example of some social fringe. 

3. Jacobsen: What was religion in Iran and in the UK for your parents?

Banafshei: Like most Iranians, both of my parents were raised in families of Shia Islam. They have remained firmly dedicated to their religious heritage throughout their lives.

4. Jacobsen: Who do the values of “education, secularism, and ambition” mean to you?

Banafshei: My philosophy of life is that knowing things, being productive and being an ethically advanced person is likely to lead to better outcomes for myself and others. I’ve had some processes of trial and error in relation to these things which have aided me on my path to this determined position. 

5. Jacobsen: Have these stores helped provide a sense of an extended self or a sense of the family legacy?

Banafshei: I guess they made sense. The role models we have when growing up are undoubtedly important, and I feel grateful to know mine have been relatively positive ones.     

6. Jacobsen: Why did your father pursue a degree in sociology at the graduate level?
Banafshei: I think one important factor has been that he’s apparently a man who is predisposed to being more interested in dealing with the theoretical aspects of things. It’s something I have always found reasonably understandable as a thinker myself, even if I have very often tended to see things quite differently to him.  

7. Jacobsen: What is religion to him (your dad)

Banafshei: It’s the system that gives his life meaning. Without an eternal purpose, life has no meaning, he has told me. He reminds me of his belief that without the guidance religion can provide, people are likely to fall for any ideological evil and become the victims of any pitfall of life. I guess being cognizant of the immense importance of religion for him while not being religious myself is something that has in part caused me to become inspired to learn about the range of the ideas of our species.

8. Jacobsen: What are some of the professional lives of your brothers?

Banafshei:  My youngest brother is still of school-age. My other brother is not in employment as he has special needs. As an older brother, I do my best to be a supportive figure of hopefully some value in terms of helping him face some of the challenges he has to deal with. I feel that I’ve developed good sensitivity and awareness of some of the things many people have to deal with in the course of their lives as a result of my efforts to make what has sometimes felt like a vital difference.

9. Jacobsen: What is the juxtaposition of religiosity and secularism for mom and dad, and you?

Banafshei: Their view has been that secularism requires public acceptance and private separation of opposing ideals. No system is perfect, and I believe things can, and do, generally function a little better than that. Of course, ultimately only time and further social development will reveal more clearly how a society should, or could, be arranged in terms of the seemingly opposing structures.

10. Jacobsen: What seems like the long-term future of religion in the 21st century with the onslaughts on science with some of the persistent supernaturals and assertions of faith texts and practices?

Banafshei: Religion will decline further as scientific advances reveal more about the various natures of our existences. It will always be around as it seems to fulfil some human spiritual need, but as we develop more tools of human welfare such systems will become redundant for more people.  

11. Jacobsen: How was the experience with peers and schoolmates as a child and an adolescent?

Banafshei: I think I was always a relatively agreeable kid who tried to be approachable and friendly with peers. My personal development of such has related to learning that it’s not always wrong to be relatively selective in terms of social association. If we define the term intelligent colloquially, then I can assert that I’ve often felt socially incompatible with the non-intelligent. 

12. Jacobsen: Is an agreeable disposition helpful for the gifted and talented?

Banafshei: I’m not sure I could provide any general advice for the gifted in terms of this. There is a range of gifted people and different things will work for different gifted people. And of course that’s not even to suggest that the social disposition of a person is necessarily more important somehow if they happen to be gifted.

13. Jacobsen: “Contrasting,” how so, in more precise terms?

Banafshei: Homosexuality and the mild sexual imagery of media representations were often the subject of serious criticism at home. I felt uncomfortable with any normalization of such things at school as child, but as I grew up it wasn’t difficult to accept some of the contradictions of the two cultures of my developmental periods.

14. Jacobsen: What is the purpose of intelligence tests to you?

Banafshei: At first it was to simply ascertain my IQ. And since I now have some idea of that, I like to occasionally look at them for purposes of seeking enjoyable intellectual challenges. 

15. Jacobsen: When was high intelligence discovered for you?

Banafshei: I guess I started to think about the possibility of this when I started to attain good exam results on some secondary school tests I didn’t care about and didn’t study for. The confidence I gained from that resulted in IQ testing not too long after. 

16. Jacobsen: Any peers who were around the same intellectual level for you?

Banafshei: I had one friend in secondary school who had good grades, a relatively impressive store of general knowledge, and seemed obviously of above-average intelligence. Sadly, I soon got the chance to learn that he was also arrogant, had antisocial attitudes and believed some races of people are inferior. It was then that I realized being intelligent doesn’t make you better than anyone else. Intelligence is only one aspect of an individual’s constitution, and I’m concerned with much more than just that.

17. Jacobsen: When you think of the ways in which the geniuses of have either been mocked, vilified, and condemned if not killed, or praised, flattered, platformed, and revered, what seems like the reason for the extreme reactions to and treatment of geniuses? Many alive today seem camera shy – many, not all.

Banafshei: The better something is understood, the less likely it is to be vilified or glorified. And in relation to this, one can never be truly praised or condemned for reflecting the conceptual systems of another back to them, which by definition is not the role the genius has to play.

18. Jacobsen: Who seem like the greatest geniuses in history to you?

Banafshei: I would mention Aristotle and Leonardo da Vinci. They were not only prominent historical geniuses of great contribution but also ones who had the vision to do great work in many areas of study. The true geniuses achieved what they did because they refused to be conservative in their estimations of what they could have achieved.  

19. Jacobsen: Who seem like great living geniuses to you?

Banafshei: I consider the greatest geniuses to be those who can be clearly connected to the most significant changes of the world. This would currently include bill gates, warren buffet, Elias James Corey, and James Watson among others.

20. Jacobsen: What is normally considered conservative in this context to delimit the full range of possibilities of the profoundly gifted to become achievers while not geniuses?

Banafshei: Most observers of any accomplishment of note will have quite limited expectations of what is possible as a result of what they’ve seen materialize, which is something they’ll often make obvious for others to see. Geniuses are rarely, if ever, those who internalize the suggestions of people who urge others to be ‘realistic’ and have limited perspectives of what they can achieve.

21. Jacobsen: What differentiates a genius from a profoundly intelligent person?

Banafshei: I think one reasonable definition of genius could be that of people who live up to their potential. Few people, myself included currently, get close to achieving the best that they could in any area of their natural capability. The difference between possibility and reality is often the difference between smart people and geniuses. 

22. Jacobsen: How much talent has gone to the garbage heap due to racist and sexist ideologies, wars, famine, societal and cultural values against individual enterprise, political constraints on radical transformation of societal ideals and norms, etc.?

Banafshei: It would certainly be interesting to know. This question resonates with me as a person who conforms to very few stereotypes of intelligence. I have not tended to be what’s regarded as nerdy, I have no university qualifications, I’m a product and member of the working-class, and I have had considerable experiences of being overlooked as a member of minority groups which seem to be gladly associated with various forms of propaganda by growing numbers of people these days.  As a result of this, I have often felt like I’ve been treated in a way that is consistent with what many expect of me in terms of these things rather than anything observable of me in actuality, which has often felt strange and alienating. I think the result of my life experiences has been that I’ve become determined to correct what’s wrong and clarify what’s true. Being written off many times in life has motivated me to try to be a positive representation of who I truly am and to inspire others to be similarly appropriate beings. Those who face difficulties relating to your question have a responsibility to overcome the obstacles they face to create a better world not only for themselves but also those who’ll be just like them.

23. Jacobsen: What have been some work experiences and educational certifications for you?

Banafshei: I have passed a basic business course in college when I was nineteen and have since worked in a variety of roles ranging from those of administration to those in the hospitality sector, I have worked as a chef for a longer period of time than I have in other roles. My current aspirations include the idea of starting my own business in the near future.  

24. Jacobsen: What kind of business adventure?

Banafshei: Without giving everything away, I can say that I intend on starting a business, or business, that’ll be inclusive of the things I care about which relate to giftedness, psychology, research, community building, and various forms of media to name a few.

25. Jacobsen: What are some of the more important aspects of the idea of the gifted and geniuses? Those myths that pervade the cultures of the world. What are those myths? What truths dispel them?

Banafshei: In relation to the above, one of the myths I’m aware of is the idea that only one in a billion of us can be an Einstein and that the rest of humanity ought to realize that they can’t be ‘geniuses’ or contribute anything of much value. The fact is there are many, many more people out there with great innovative potential than what seems to be popularly estimated. Great potential seems to be much rarer than it really is to people when they fail to grasp that the achievement of a person is not necessarily only limited by what they are capable of. Success is better evidence of intelligence than failure is of stupidity. The myths of intelligence will be dispelled by efforts of using it.

26. Jacobsen: What are some social and political views for you? Why hold them?

Banafshei: I don’t have any fixed social or political view. There are different ways of societal functioning, and different people are suited to different systems. 

27. Jacobsen: Where have you sat before? Where do you sit now? I am speaking socially and politically.

Banafshei: For most of my life, my views haven’t been dissimilar to what’s seen as the prevailing ones of British society. I believe what’s right is simply a matter of context. If we want to implement the correct social/political systems, then we ought to be dedicated to being knowledgeable about things first. People who currently have loud political voices are often not very intelligent or knowledgeable. And too many people tend to be socio-politically disinterested apparently due to pessimism of change and a lack of appreciation of the important issues.

28. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on the God concept or gods idea and philosophy, theology, and religion?

Banafshei: As a non-religious person, my interest in religion is based on a desire to try to understand it’s connection to historical human culture, spirituality and philosophy. Everything is connected and for those of us who have relatively vast interests of learning, it makes sense to explore this significant aspect of human social evolution. 

29. Jacobsen: How much does science play into the worldview for you?

Banafshei: If I had to quantify it, I’d say a lot. If reasoning of a scientific nature, or scientific possibility at least, cannot be provided for something philosophical, then it is meaningless.

30. Jacobsen: What have been some of the tests taken and scores earned (with standard deviations) for you?

Banafshei: I’ve taken triplex light by Ivan Ivec as well as GENE Verbal II and GIFT Verbal I by Iakovos Koukas. I achieved scores of 161, 180 and 170 sd15 on those tests respectively.

31. Jacobsen: What ethical philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Banafshei: Currently, it seems the golden rule works well enough in most circumstances. The associated imperfections of it can be overcome by simply getting to know one another better, of course.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Mhedi Banafshei on Background, Religion, Geniuses, and Intelligence Tests (Part One) [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/banafshei-one.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Updates on Ex-Muslims in France and Elsewhere

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 1.A, Idea: The Tale of the Tribe: International Apostates

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: Apostasia

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: June 30, 2020

Issue Publication Date: TBD

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Once Per Year

Words: 736

Keywords: apostasy, ex-Muslim, France, Waleed Al-Husseini.

Updates on Ex-Muslims in France and Elsewhere[1],[2]

Waleed Al-Husseini founded the Council of Ex-Muslims of France. He escaped the Palestinian Authority after torture and imprisonment in Palestine to Jordan and then France. He is a friend. 

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What happened in the summer 2018 season for the non-religious? 

Waleed Al-Husseini: This summer was calm a bit.

We have some of the summer meetings here in France to welcome the new members and introduce them for the others, and following some of he issues of ex-Muslims who had some of justice issues like Sharif Gaber in Egypt. Then there were some problems in Jordan.

The greatest sadness: we lost one great fighter and writer. His name is Walid Al-Qubisi. He is organizing from Iraq, but lives in Norway and in the 1980s got shot by Islamists in Oslo. He spent months in the hospital, then he left it.

This summer, we lost him. It was really sad even for me because he was one of the 1st fighters of political Islam in Europe.

Jacobsen: How were things for the ex-Muslim community in France – safer, more people?

Al-Husseini: We have some new members that is why we made summer meetings. They joined us. We talked about the dangers for us and described to them how things are and our activities.

For the security things, we got many threats through the internet after big discussions about hijab and child marriage. Some of our Twitter accounts got removed!

Jacobsen: As an internationalist independent journalist, when I get a story of an ex-religious person or a sexual minority individual, I cannot solve the problem, but I can bring light to their plight – simply hear and feel their horrible narrative as they tell it.

What does telling the stories, simply being heard by someone else, do for the ex-Muslims or the LGBTI community in solidarity if anything?

Al-Husseini: For the stories and testimony, it is really important to show for some who think about Islam that he or she is not alone, there are others who had questions. One, through this, he left Islam. These types of testimony also say, “We are the voices of the many.”

It helps to show for others that ex-Muslims exist. They have to fight one of the hardest fights in the world as the globe becomes more and more fundamentalist in orientation. Ex-Muslims are the solution for making Islam less fundamentalist, because of all these stories and the critiques and debates on Islam are now in the open.

Because of these things, we have some people now talking about modern Islam or trying to moderate Islam. All these things because of ex-Muslims!

Jacobsen: Have there been some new ex-Muslim voices people should keep an eye on for their poignant analysis of the realities of the ex-Muslim community (global community)? 

Al-Husseini: Yes, Sharif Gaber, the YouTuber Egyptian, who faces justice now. Hamed Abdel-Samad with his show Box of Islam – and also his books, and the other ex-Muslims like Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Ibn Waraq, in the Arabic world like Said Alqumi, for other groups like Atheist Arab Magazine. It is really a good one.

Also, some Arabic sites exist on the internet and blogs too.

Jacobsen: Thank you for the opportunity and your time, Waleed.

Image Credit: Waleed Al-Husseini.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, In-Sight Publishing.

[2] Individual Publication Date: June 30, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/updates-on-ex-muslims-in-france-and-elsewhere.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, In-Sight Publishing, and Apostasia 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two)

 

 

 

 

 

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 14,730

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas earned an intelligence test score of 193 (S.D. 16), or 1 in 323,940,499 people. Some claim him as the smartest man in Latin America to me. He discusses: some of the concerns over women’s rights; a multiverse theory from 2014; the multiverse theory incorporate the Big Bang theory framework; this multiverse theory bring together any more dimensionality than the normal three spatial dimensions and one temporal dimension; some personal quotes; jaguars; an adaptation on top of Kung Fu; humans like machines; the level of and kind of prostitution in America; the level of and kind of prostitution in Mexico; sexual trafficking networks function between the United States and Mexico (and Canada); some effective ways to combat sexual trafficking and prostitution networks; human beings capable of a 5-8-dimensional conceptualization of the world and its relations; humans apart from machines; theory of life; this theory of life differentiate from machines, automatons; the smartest and most evil person in the history of the world; the most important aspect of the emancipation of women; the religious traditions help in the furtherance of human rights; human rights be an important part of the advancement of women’s rights (as part and parcel of human rights); human rights and religious law come into conflict; and the source of morality.

Keywords: America, automatons, Big Bang, identity, IQ, Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas, Kung Fu, Mexico, sexual trafficking, women’s rights.

An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: If we look at some of the concerns over women’s rights for you, what are the main concerns now?

Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas: My main concerns are that:

Despite we as humankind have progressed to a large extent in some areas, including some in technology at giant pace:

1) There is still a huge disparity between rights between men and women in almost all of the world.

Such disparity is yet to be seen by literally all accounts in culture and society that range from a huge gap in wage inequality for men and for women. In some countries such disparity even peaks to 32% of salaries earned by men and women and the great prejudice that still remains in most of the globe about “Women not being as good as men to perform the same activities at work,” and this ranges from normal or common people environment to higher leagues, look at say sports, soccer, despite I’m no big fan to soccer I know that World Fifas for male players are far more profitable and draw far more attention than those about women.

2) Beauty contests which are of course not just for women but for men, but the ones for ladies like Miss Universe are far more widely watched and I hate to say, profitable around the world. Obviously such are to actually compare women as though if they were nothing, just objects, and this mirrors another sad reality that still is clear in several countries and still a lingering problem in many more: Women are to be seen but not listened.

3) If a lady cheats on her husband, is terribly seen in so many places by so many people but if a husband cheats on her wife, is not as frowned upon, in fact, in several countries this practice is not just well seen but even lawful and rewarded, and this also entails what many still think of what a woman should be like: a devoted wife, to attend her husband and children, to stay home, at the kitchen and to be cheated on, mistreated and even dumped away as if she were nothing, a submissive woman with no rights, no actual voice and to depend on her husband completely.

4) The regrettable prostitution practice. Some call t the oldest job or occupation but it is neither a job nor it’s an occupation. Guys who support this don’t think: Would I ever like it if my mom, my sister, my cousin, my friend or my daughter be into this? So many don’t get to think of that such women have parents. Moreover, because of women not seen actually as equals or peers in life, the huge gap in rights disparity, women left with their children and limited education and job opportunities feel they have the need to earn money for them and for their children at expense of their bodies, as though if they were products for sale. I have been invited a number of times to hire them and I ALWAYS refused. My advice is: naturally please don’t hire them, don’t support this meretricious practice (I’m not against prostitutes, I’m against prostitution), don’t let your fellows push you, it’s your choice, not theirs, you will not disappoint anyone and you should about that not if it comes to treat a human as an object. It’s not a sign of manhood to her prostitutes, on the contrary, not to hire them and treating ladies with respect and equality is a sign of manhood, even if a lady pushes you to do otherwise. Use your brain and use your heart.

5) In point 2 I brought mistreated women up. This entails that many women are still subject to domestic violence, from psychological, emotional, even spiritual to physical violence, and even sexual violence. Guys who mistreat their ladies and/or children are NOT men.

I must add that personally also consider that when it comes to talk about God, most people in English language for instance, refer to God as a him, and I don’t think God has a gender, instead, he is beyond that and I refer to God as it, e.g. God is our guide, may ITS will be achieved. Not just in English language we observe misogyny but in several languages.

2. Jacobsen: You have a multiverse theory from 2014. What is it? How does it work?

Navas: My multiverse theory or as I call it more appropriately, a model, explains why, in an infinite space (it must be infinite for stars and all matter is moving away to the space to a faster space than what it was supposed to be, and it will be exponentially fast) there cannot possibly be any equal or what would be called an exact duplicate of you and me, and all else. That also entails free will and keeps from order to chaos. It entails symmetry and asymmetry, from atoms and smaller particles to larger, incredibly much larger concepts like a universe, say a huge group of stars and galaxies, and that since in nature there is order yet there cannot be an exact order all the time, it may be impossible for an exact duplicate o you, me, etc… to exist, especially in a perfectly time in which you cannot put a specific point on it, neither on space nor on time. So there could be an exact duplicate of you and me, etc… Everything would have to be exactly identical on the other side, as almost in a mirror, in infinite space time where no particular point can be placed? There is a Universal principle that holds not just for religion, philosophy or theology but also for science: As above, so below. WE recall how similar a solar system can be to an atom, as I had told at age 2.

3. Jacobsen: How does the multiverse theory incorporate the Big Bang theory framework?

Navas: As a direct consequence of that there cannot possibly be equal replicas or duplicates of you, me nor anything else, it shows that Big Bang was just as it was.

4. Jacobsen: Does this multiverse theory bring together any more dimensionality than the normal three spatial dimensions and one temporal dimension?

Navas: On its own at first glance it may seem to bring up just 3 dimensions, but uses time as just a parameter, not as a dimension. Time is not a dimension. It hardly uses more than 3 dimensions ever, on its own in a basic level.

5. Jacobsen: You have some personal quotes. What are some of the favourites?

Navas: Hard to pick Scott, I herein give you almost all my quotes, but I fist provide you my tendency on them: paradox in them to mirror truth from within as to without, from inner to outer.

A few notes on my quotes. It’s clearly specified on Facebook that they have been subject to copyrights and FBI.

They are not numbered because of a good reason; knowledge cannot be quantifiable.

Some have no quotation marks because they are truth for sure.

Some claim guess who as credits because of the supreme being I consider.

There is more space or gap between some of them denoting order and mystery, to be more between some of them:

“One may be shy when talking to the person one loves most, romantically, and it may seem like weakness and insecurity, but the other side is quite the opposite, sensibility, which renders a lot of strength. Two sides of the coin apparently, yet two extremes in love.”

“Betray yourself NOT, that’s what you must NOT do, don´t betray thy goals.”

“How come we say: God bless America; America is a blessing hence the best implicit way to express it is: God bless America the blessing.”

“What IS the greatest country in the world? Russia, for its vastness, China in terms of anthropocentrism for the largest population, but America or the USA is the greatest one (at the MOST) in light of her grandeur and grandiosity.”

“Infinity can be relative also.”

“It’s great to assist others and not thinking we are the center of the creation, but our own world is too complex enough, hence it’s better to help others and nature.”

“America is touted the MOST paradoxical country, ironically America is the GREATEST dream, but for the same reason it’s the MOST REAL thing and the MOST REAL dream, the GREATEST human accomplishment under God.”

“Time and space are not just relative, but also paradoxical just like the Universe or this sub-existence, but most of all, this existence and many others quite could be also paradoxical.”

“Have as much ambition as you can, for there’s nothing you cannot do.”

“It’s a lot easier, far easier to search in light than to search in darkness, just because of scape, the speed, but also because there is nothing as elusive to humans than the subtle of the deep of the obvious, that enlightens a lot, within light, the more we get, the better. Yet don’t let light blind you, as a tree blinding you from a forest.” (Because of itself being so fantastic and WONDERful, whilst darkness is blinding also.)

“It’s paradoxical that the topmost problem to humans means the lowest and meanest path while for many it many seem the highest yet deepest issue.”

“God has given us intelligence to understand it as best as possible we can.”

“Love and care ecology, and nature, for without it we could not just exist the way we know.”

“Every single self-idea and breakthrough in life is an awakening as well as learning new stuff.”

“To realize we have 5 dimensions in our minds is deep, to understand it is high, living accordingly is elevated and serving life accordingly is divine and sublime.”

“Count your awakenings not for the sunrises but for every single new logical idea that comes across your mind, and every single discovery.”

“To think and to have the right intuition is to live at least in the plane, talking on plain terms.”

“Understand how we have 5 dimensions is neat, understanding why may be mature, but giving it a for what, a good one is subtle, not doing so is sin.”

“Every nap that does not yield a good inspiration is a wasted one.”

“Sometimes it’s required to see things from above in order to see through them.”

“When one accumulates something that is not gonna use out of fear one has no little mustard faith seed on the positive, and when one accumulates something out of fear that weighs more than oneself one is already in danger and that would be fearful enough! yet to fear fear itself is healthy, sane.”

“Imagination and logics are not only the optics with the which we look at the world, but also how we mostly feel it and live it with.”

“If our imagination is so humanly limited and inconsistent, don’t even try to imagine what would become of us if we don’t use it or limit it even more.”

“It’s funny how when a crowd is yelling something say in protest and riots I can’t understand what they say coz of lot of chaos with apparent order, but in opera with harmony single order, etc., I can’t understand anything either.”

“Mathematics make infinite sense, but love makes infinitely more sense.” (From imagination that is defied by both, and this entailing transfinite numbers, categorizable infinites, love for mathematics as an under and upper scope, and of course love.)

“How is it possible that small minds can shelter so big nonsenses, but they cannot home the smallest bright ideas, and it’s funny how the biggest minds don’t shelter the biggest dullness and shelter the biggest bright ideas.”

“The top problem of humans not only at individual stage, but also as a global one, is to think to be the center of the world, for their ability to modify the environment and their path, and just imagine if no human thought they were the center of the world…”

“It’s funny how if intelligence is so subjective to our perception, and so to our intelligence…can we say both sides are on balance if we tried to resume to just terms?”

“How come we say God bless America if America is the blessing?”

“Ironies and paradoxes are somehow the inverse verses in life insofar as we see it, not just organic life at times.”

“It takes one to be brave when it comes to a new breakthrough, for curiosity takes to that, hence at times it takes even more rare to question: established things or new discoveries.” Guess who (plus the paradox factor)

“It takes to be so much awaken to accomplish dreams.”

“Those who dream are more awake than those who do not have dreams at all.”

“It is paradoxical this whole creation, hence we must wonder and ask about it, but more paradoxical is that we don’t wonder about that paradox on its own.”

“A top problem to humans is not to focus on solutions.”

“Cleverness is to dream; dullness is to fantasize.”

“Funnily interesting that when I provided the warning about FBI and my copyrights early on I had to a little extent some creativity of my own.”

“To learn by oneself is cleverness, applying is honor.”

“Sadly ironic that since history rhymes a lot, and one of the most, if not the most rhyming and constant trait has been war, war is not one bit poetic.”

“Sadly ironic that since history rhymes a lot, and one of the most, if not the most rhyming and constant trait has been war, war is not one bit poetic, but it ma be even sadder or even more heroic that despite that heroes are and love thrives.”

“Intelligence is the greatest of all paradoxes.”

“U.S.A. is the best country in the world”
Guess who means God, people.

“I’m an American patriot with American heart, therefore I exist.”

“To think correctly is the best of all medicines.”

“Laying the foot in order to give the first step is better in any instance than not laying the foot at all (by not giving the first step) for not giving the first step is LAYING THE BOTH FEET!”

“Its paradoxical within humans that they want to know more, ignorance annoys them, but they fear and to some extent it annoys them what they don’t know.”

“How come spare time and need into curiosity are the chief inventive leaders?”

“The most contagious of all diseases is irrational fear.”

“If humans all learned to love and take care of nature wars would be over.”

“It’s difficult to find worthwhile things that are easy.”

“Humility and amazement are the blood for learning.”

“The Universal question is: Why and how are why and how the universal questions?”

“If you’re not confused about it then you did not have it clearly understood (humanly speaking and under some circumstances).”

“Genius is to make ‘difficult’ stuff simple and the simple, subtle.”

“It’s somehow funny that the rectangular objects called books are not entirely compatible with the Great Book of life (Big Picture).”

“In practice theory may be very subjective but at times experience may be even more.”

I was thinking about what my favorite quote is from all those I have compiled by myself, and I then thought “The subtlest way to get to know oneself is by having own logical and deep phrases.” That´s my favorite quotation after all (on gen.).

“Why is art is the subtlest and the gateway to the art of knowing and how?”

“U.S.A. has been the miracle posed by God to guide the world in human-like following way.”

“It is good to know that the lord was and is good despite many who claim he was good “

“Funny it’s crystal and VERY clear that the lazy one has a pale future and white as in the whitest papers and has a dark future so dark that is so black.”

“The real nutcase is the one who has no proper ideas and nor logical ideas at all.” Guess who, Me

“It takes a fair amount of analysis, memory and imagination to compile quotes, and apparently they limit imagination, but I don’t want to imagine what would be of the world without them.

“Fantasizing is the sweetest of all deaths being alive.”

“The one who does not study correctly does not know her/himself (the right thing would be to say the one who doesn’t study correctly almost knows a minimal part of her or himself, for that person knows she or he doesn’t like to study, but doesn’t know what her or his likes would be, just half a minimal part, but the poetic art would be lost).”

“Crazy the lazy and the lazy goes crazy.” (predictability and Newton’s quote on being unable to calculate human insanity)

“If you believe everything that reads on the books, you better don’t read at all, especially do not write any book’ likewise if you believe everything you hear, don’t listen at all, but above all then do not talk at all.”

The metamessage from the Haunted Mansion is “It is hell when we think of ourselves as the center of the world and the center of the Universe by default.”

“Young innocence and experienced maturity on their own are good into a romantic relationship, to keep the wonderment of innocent young as an “experienced grownup.” is virtue, but comparing both, about which is most important is the top of cynicism.

“Every single subject at school and every branch of science is like a string in the big life guitar.”

“Each and every subject at school is math, just perceived in a different way.”

“I think, therefore I live, thereafter I am. (talk about it with a ghost)
(funny that Descartes´s spirit is more into corrected than in his own words which have less life)

“Since Statistics, probability and logics are the least consisting of all math branches, and we think: we are slaves of what we say? especially on those? Proofs?????”

“Have you ever wondered why and how curiosity is the mother of all “inventions.” being that this is not an invention? (Curious thing I did not find a more creative way to lay the terms in plain facts, don’t you think?) (Curious would be that this being apparently the most curious argument would not be the most curious as such, being so curious that this quote is curious, especially if we define curious in many scales).” Curious don’t you think? is there a more subtle or creative way to say it was me?

“The lazy fellow so slow that something as sluggish as idleness is fast enough to catch up with him/her.”

“If intelligence is the greatest of all paradoxes, and paradoxes are the greatest expressions of sense of humor, it’s even a greater paradox that intelligence is not the greatest expression of sense of fun, even funny paradoxically and it’s the greatest expression of sense of groove, especially because it’s in the middle (neither dull, nor God like and it takes intelligence to be really funny) hence it’s one of those situations written in sentences that can neither be false nor they can be true. Not so funny is it?”

“Justice is the equilibrium of seeing and not seeing at the same time (beware, using this the wrong way can take to hell, for indifference is the perfect crime, you see but you’re blinder if you don’t act).”

“A very sane way to classify humans is that we all humans are divided into 4 basic types of braincases: holly ones, poor ones, damn ones, and plain ones (Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Tim Burton, most graphic one), not seeing this is insane, to some extent…”

“Most people ignore this: If fear at the large context is the most contagious of all diseases, why isn’t fear to ignorance a brink for no ignorance?”

“Since there is nothing more elusive to humans than the subtle of the deep of the obvious, and how it is in the surface, one should consider one is one’s own worst enemy by not believing n oneself, as light and dark… easier to search in light than dark, but beware not to be selfish!”

“You may think ignorance and indifference are the worst crimes, two opposites and extremes, especially indifference, but the perfect crime committed by evil is the one that cannot possibly be known (ignorance by people or craftiness of committer) but now don’t be indifferent to this one, the obvious but subtle thing here is that the perfect crime does exist indeed, and it is indifference in all ways, negligence, uncaring, etc., whether not know that happened or worse, everyone knows that happened and laws don´t enforce to curtail it and, maybe you did not see this, but now that u do, it would be worse if u neglect it.”

“The art of learning and having own ideas (its being even far more alive) is the eternal youth source, for every time we learn something and we wonder more, the younger we become.”

“The greatest thing about genius and intelligence is that genius does not exist, maybe the smartest idea,” quirky paradox.

“The day when we live with plants and animals as our equals, that day prehistory will actually end.”

“Amazement, humble attitude, curiosity and intelligence are the ABCs of breakthroughs.”

“Science and Spiritual studies are married for both share the idea of explaining existence in a world that needs both desperately.”

“So curious don’t you think that curiosity is the cure to some extent to ignorance, but also makes it hurt worse?”

“Funny math is born to die, but makes the mathematician live forever if contributions are done, physics is born to apparently live, without those biology and life could not be possible, perhaps, such a logical mathematical reasoning shall live forever.”

“Is it the most logical argument in ground terms that logics was born to die? that would be funny because logics is so alive that it gives life to everything apparently tangible that it dies because of that.”

“Metalogics is the breath that God printed in all things, and since it was born to die, that´s what also makes it immortal, logical right?”

“I don’t doubt that doubt is the break in the trip of learning that speeds learning up.”

“Think love, love to feel, feel the love, and love to think.”

“If I thought to love, love to feel, feel the love and loved to think the quote “Think love, love to feel, feel the love, and love to think.” could be done the right way which I would think to love, love to fee, feel the love and loved to think, would be a blessing, but if mistaken would be a curse.”

“To think correctly is free, not to do so is quite expensive.”

“To first give love to oneself is fortitude, to get love from oneself is inspiring, but only take love for oneself is weakness and not to give love to others is cowardice given this mindframe.” (OK, partly inspired by Lao Tzu, but remember what Leonardo da Vinci said about not overpassing our teachers?)

“Funny and wise is that we say and do: live today as if it were the first day of your life, and the last one.”

“Probably it would be reasonable to better analyze ideas rather than facts or people, in my opinion, would be the best path for progress.”

“Benjamin Franklin’s quote, ‘If you would not be forgotten as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write something worth reading or do something worth writing,’ and to think and have logical proper ideas is matter of survival are the two sides of the same coin, a coin I call survithinking.”

“Wonder this: if you’re a money magnet for you attract money to you, you’re successful, if money attracts you, you´re actually poor, but if you attract money for the welfare of your loved ones, the community and nature, wealth has no limit.”

“Apparently coining logical terms is quite paradoxically cheap and hard, but not doing so is QUITE expensive, this I call -unchexpensive-Coining-”

“The equilibrium of life is one of the off-beat most ones for all parts are connected and communicated but we get balance from two sides yet the other one, the top most one has no need of the others intrinsically yet cannot be completed without the two others.”

“Understanding and deriving others wise quotations is clever but having proper ones and evolving them is wisdom.

“Interesting that in life its required to see things right from above, but life cannot be seen right from above nor many other angles from, and somehow it can.”

“A zero at left hand has no rights.”

“Especially when it comes to mathematics, it may seem a lot safer many times to be at shoulders of the giants than being following steps. Not laying the feet would be worse!”

“Imagination in many aspects is like servant who serves the master analysis, and not the analysis master so many times, who cleans and prepares the entrance of analysis.”

“It’s really so funny that if comedy comes easy not, real life and reality actually come a lot harder, undoubtedly!”

“The real deal and not an ordeal is to know not what other choices we could have taken but to understand those by what we have already taken the ones we already did.”

“Interestingly not so odd that it is neither true nor it is false that we cannot coin a quote on DIVINE LOVE for it’s the TRUTH.” Neither it is false nor it is true it was me.

“If math was born to be dead especially Pure math, what does that tell us about quotes?” (Logics, metalogics, metamath and metamessages).”

“Irrational Fear being so slow and or the slow ones that she or he who acts diligently and solves problems and is faster at previewing and having proper ideas.”

“Humanly speaking, it may seem that in order to invent (actually discover) we need imagination but imagination to humans, so far is an invention on its own.”

“I act so fast and create so boldly and craftily that fear never reaches me.”

“Paramount is the quote that on its own may be seen from as many points of view or versions yet they all are true.”

“A quote that is right in ALL versions of it may seem to be a puzzle with several parts but such quote is on its own just a part of a puzzle, especially if it mirrors the author.”

“A quote that is right in ALL versions of it may seem to be a puzzle with several parts but such quote is on its own just a part of a puzzle, especially if it mirrors the author who we know may feel free to wonder as for the author and ourselves: how free is he not only about the ability to think and express but to own and be slave what the author knows and keeps quite and/or talks about?”

“NO question: doubt offends, YET, questions can be either a path to heaven, or a path to hell, so who said Ignorance is bliss, especially on HOW to ask? not to mention by what?”

“Differential equations are the arteries that make the blood of life and universe life flow like poetry uncovered.”

“The deeper the ocean of knowledge is compared to the infinite space, paradoxically, does not quench my thirst for knowledge, the more I drink from it the thirstier I feel.”

“Paradoxically, we have more and less free will than we imagine because of our imagination.”

“Odd that for slow minds mouths can be too fast.”

“Curious it is that what gives curiosity die is what makes it even much more alive.”

“Curious it is that what gives curiosity die is what makes it even much more alive. Wondrous it is that we cannot wonder by what wonders are, don’t you think?”

“Imagine how far we can go if events conquer our imagination, to some degree it would be good that imagination abashes us, for we are largely imaginative beings, but let’s not allow imagination conquer us, yet with it we make great progresses.”

“Love is the solid rock upon which u build your being, your life, your essence, more love, but someone with solid rock head and heart cannot be strong enough for that.”

“Strong minds would understand this and most likely feeble-minded people would not: It takes a fair amount of strength in being and mind to change by oneself (especially for values, love, etc.) yet it takes feeble minds to pretend to change somebody else.”

“It would be the top of mediocrity do things out of conceiving God in mere sense of need and to consider God needs us.”

“In mathematics, a plan that works once is a step but may also be seen as a lucky trick, if it works two times straight it’s a procedure, if it works three or more times it’s a rule, if it works over 5 times, it’s a method, if it works more it’s a law: Interesting generalization.” (Consider seeing from the reverse: I understand I know almost nothing, then I sense, I learn, I copy I sense I understand the greater my ignorance was, and so the cycle goes on.)

Is it funny there are no quotes for quotes as such?”
(For curiosity leading humans.)

“Need is the most illusory and most dangerous invention of human mind.”
(Something we should know and especially not to ignore.)

“Is need the most hazardous “perception.” of humankind? How curious is it that we wonder that and how much? Need to…?”
(What does this tell you about what are so called problems and/or opportunity areas?”)

About opportunities and problems “It’s said justice is blind but it’s way blinder to turn a blind eye into opportunities, areas of opportunities (problems) Better not to ignore this beyond need in order to improve life.”

“Zeros, we cannot live without them but we can live better with them, we cannot die without them but it’s better to die with them.”

The above statement and quote mirrors something about math: “What makes math mortal makes them immortal.” and “Were math born to die?” and Me

“Curious that if it wasn’t for curiosity the vast majority of humans would had committed suicide (not having curiosity on its own is suicidal, not dare will) yet when exploring into curiosity and more we don’t know what’s gonna happen, at times perhaps what happened to the cat whose curiosity killed.”

“People may talk about quotes, some may talk about their contents, but how can we wonder and dig more about their truths?” (Notice the parts of people, some, etc.; and the apostrophes.)

“While the stubborn doesn’t know what she/he is saying the wise doesn’t say what she/he knows, plus more stubborn the one who argues a stubborn, but even more for stubborn ones, perseverants must be many people especially if only one.”

“When understanding ecology and animal nature I understand politics better but I stay away from politics by checking animal behavior.”

“There are at least two ways to question what you are being taught or you are learning: Either not believing it (not believing everything you read, hear, etc.) by logics, intuition, etc.) and asking many, many and as many questions as you possibly can about it to prove it either more true or prove it wrong or neither true nor false….”

“When sculpting, rendering a being’s soul is your essence, essentially, but when rendering a spirit on the rocks from inspiration is pure freeing…”

“It’s curious that we may grasp the idea or gist of a book but is that what it’s actually saying? Meta-messages show that the truth may not be entirely true, the starting point of knowledge in contrast with apparent total ignorance.”

“Curious enough it is that new ideas, new discoveries are needed but very urgent is the most curiosity, yet essential is to improve life in harmony with life/biology in order to keep it alive and us.”

“There is nothing more elusive than the subtle of the deep of the obvious, hence the obvious, especially the most obvious should not blind us.”

“At times the one who knows what one wants takes perseverance, not knowing what one wants may lead to stubbornness, knowing how to reach what one wants and finding who one is heroic, whilst not knowing and being alienated and stubborn is tragic and villainous for the most, but the opposite to the aforementioned is traitorous, even more stubborn and far more villainous.”

“We should know more about that for humans, knowledge has two faces, especially when we find out more and how we feel about it. There is a very common human face when discovering something: amazement, but this renders either smarts or foolishness, depending, but the more we are fascinated the more we see it has another two faces, surprise and bafflement and even at times extreme bafflement (depending on one uses it for as human, for the better or for the worse.”

“Fruit cases and idiots are to be sent mailing, but headstrongs are to be totally avoided, nobody should ignore this (see the connotation of ignorance here?).”

“Funny that comedy doesn’t come easy let alone reality and real life.”

“To dream is to live, to achieve is to super live, to be amazed for how big we can dream and do is glory, but to fantasize is to die; we don’t need that much intuition to realize the statement, do we?”

“Is Secret the most controversial term and even more the most controversial concept to humans? The irony is that it is and many things can be derived from this one, even more so if we think of that “ignorance is the shadow of secret.”

“Is it necessary to bear on mind the mindlessness and foolishness of the dumbs in order to help appreciate intellect in humans and the genius of a few? necessity, stressing here curiosity. In 3 levels: naive approaches, junction of amazement and non-amazement in a face that shows both potentially, and stubbornness especially: Not necessarily need and mere curiosity. How insane are they? Are they insane enough? (Beware curiosity doesn’t become an essential-most part of need.”

“If you’re able to count your money you’re not a rich person, nevertheless God’s blessings and himself are gifts I am far less able to count such that money is a mean and I serve Master God so first we are not too great when we help others who are in need especially bearing on mind that money is a way, but having in heart more (also to aid ecology and thank it most of all) so if you’re a rich person you can count on your money, but you cannot count it, but infinitely more unmeasurable is God to be counted on and infinitely less measurable and we are great by helping others and not when it comes to do it (what a congruence).”

“It’s alright to be a rightist, you’re correct and it’s you’re right if you’re, but overcorrectness is not right! am I right?”

“This is essential, and beyond mere survival: some claim love is a survival mechanism, but hatred is a lot more.” (Come on, that were so love could be defined and it’s not possible to define.)

“I am the master of money, so God is my master so I can serve the Lord in harmony (including ecology).”

“Those who lack imagination are the most insane and evidently the craziest ones, those who have limited imagination fantasize, even those with imagination but those with creative imagination and realize their virtues are the ones that move the world.”

“To think is to live, but to feel and be congruent with one´s heart and mind is making the soul stronger.”

“Not moving from a comfort one is dying, discoveries take some degree of chaos from curiosity, curiously not moving is far more chaotic.”

“If logics is the art of being confident of thinking the wrong way, what would we say and imagine about metalogics?”

“It’s amazing in truth how unquestionably question and amazement are close relatives that seem to be married and create more…”

“History flows and may and may not give characters free will, but heroes and main characters are hooks that nail history down.”

“An author’s quote may mirror what the author is, but metamessages and derived quotes echo the author even more.”

“If a quote mirrors what an author is and metamessages and derivate messages which the author, the author may become a shadow in the sand of time, but a greater echo in time, but certainly the original quotes become the shadows.”

“We have to fear just fear itself but we should fear not to have fear even more, but above all, fear not to focus on solutions, and worse even: to ignore this quote.”

“There is nothing more elusive to humans than the subtle of the deep of the obvious, at times because there is nothing more elusive than the subtle of the obvious.”

“Curiously it may seem dumb to get into something we don’t know anything about and nobody does, dumber is not to get into it for there is no fool question, just the one that is not wondered and expressed, for mistakes do not exist if we learn from them.

“Math were born to die, especially and ironically for those characters who find out new things in math are hooked to history, but because of that math are even more prone to die, ironically also because this mirrors that what makes math mortal makes them immortal (inconsistency, non-applied math).”

“Quotes, especially if derived ones, may be a twin blade sword.”

“Paramount is that from the plain sentences from the Bible quotes are not readily available, but quotes can be made if putting the right statements from the Bible together, especially when reckoning them together correctly.”

“Imagination and curiosity: not too surprised yet very surprised how both complement one another, despite curiosity and questioning may seem the antidote to lack of imagination and over imagination….”

“It’s funnily curious that math may be seen as a game by all scopes: either for it’s a game that should groove us all, OR for those who don’t take it the way it should be (either too seriously or don’t like it) as a game too, yet for any scope it should be learned at taught (even self-taught) with the children’s natural curiosity…Not a joke they are though!”

“If breakthroughs are made beyond need, and then beyond curiosity, but to improve life (American philosophy), and, one of the greatest questions to us humans is: Who we are…. this holds better in the gap between need and curiosity, but it’s more NECESSARY between curiosity and life-improvement, and noticing this is a twin-blade sword, then the both sides of the balance are in equilibrium to humans?” (What makes the quote alive, and gives it life.)

“We should first let our minds fly and fly our minds before setting the first step… (laying the foot, for worse or for better), especially considering quantum leaps.”

“Happiness may be searched, found, constructed, but when you really know you’re alive is when you are overjoyed (beyond mere happiness).”

“The irony of neither being linear because of being linear is that it may seem very sensical to use the brain to serve life, dumber is to use the brain to just use humankind but the top of dumbest is to use the brain to serve machines.”

“The greater irony of neither being linear because of being linear is that it may seem very sensical to use the brain to serve life, dumber is to use the brain to just use humankind but the top of dumbest is to use the brain to serve machines for it takes courage to dare to live and it may even seem rather dumb to try something new if one doesn’t have a clue about where that may lead one especially considering human imagination is limited to natural senses, also inconsistent is and conceptual as well yet those are great reasons to also go beyond even when bravery at times may seem to be dumbness when the risks are higher.”

“Freedom is to be able to know what one wants, attain it but also having the strength and the ability to control desires from which it starts.”

“Sanity in soliloqueries is the one in which people question themselves and talk to God and their conscience, and insanity is for those who have no conscience but pretend and say they are talking to their conscience.”

“Freedom is to be able to know what one wants, attain it but also having the strength and the ability to control desires from which it starts but most of all, to be able to break buildups down and expand one´s panorama.”

“I feel like a cat when it comes to laugh about that religions once proven may die before math do.”

“Funny that logics in quotes is apparently so evident but metalogics is to some extent more.”

“So funny that comedy comes easy not, but funnier is that real life and reality come harder.”

“Math, numbers and letters have been witnesses to human history, because math evaluates and unites.”

“Mathematics, what evaluates and apparently separates does so because it unites.”

“A reason why for the most we cannot be ahead in time at math for almost all, is because math is like a friend who gives us more when we learn than what we can give to it?
yet we are to fight what we read, wonder more been beyond mere questions, and own examples being created for if it works once its luck, if it works twice it´s a rule, if it works more than 3 times it´s a method, and a number of times, countless times it works and that’s what unites things, analogies.” (Reason….)

“An edifice with no books has no soul, so give me more and more books so my soul never dies and I will give you books.”

“Quotes are the best way to talk to oneself especially if they come from oneself.”

“What is more predictable and least prophetic, denial or confusion? Surely ignorance and indifference are the worst friends to those.”

Freedom is paid with the blood of the brave, when honorable American flag waves is because of the breath of those who died for America and sacrificed it all for her ideals of honor, peace, equality, such wind goes among us when we stand for those values like powerful and proud like eagle and peaceful like doves, and such wind makes us fly with humility as well and elevates us for God has them in glory.”

“Logics is the mirror too interesting and curious for metalogics is the mirror to amazement and humility being this set a mirror to the first one, but since both seem to be the two sides of a coin, also stands that one doesn’t know what lies ahead, with luck we go ahead.”

“Logics is the mirror too interesting and curious for metalogics is the mirror to amazement and humility being this set a mirror to the first one, also mirrored to one another are that high and elevated is logics while it’s also deep and profound.”

“Logically numbers are great friends with whom I play for math is a game so I cannot say they give me problems (in Russian what we know as mathematical problem is said Zadach, which doesn’t mean problem, for if math is a game, no problems it should give).”

“It´s the top of binarity that real life is considered binary but virtual realm is also binary.”

“Those who have the spirit of ideas and have them clear are perseverant and don’t say what they know unlike those who claim to have the ideas but have a mind as white as a white paper and so pale being really stubborn, hence thanks to the stubborn people the world sets back for they don’t know what they say and thanks to the perseverant the world goes ahead for they at times don’t say what they know.”

“For those whose pale ideas on freedom and change have are too blind to see the spirit and to feel it of liberty and to have it all clear, the darker is their book in black with all white papers in all and are blinder towards the future that is right before all of us.”

“A draft is a twin blade sword: either we are humble to realize we ignore more OR we are poor excuses to progress and too coward to face the future that is right before us though we don’t see it.” (Knowledge, progress and being a draft are twin-blade swords.)

“It’s essential to fight violence by first using the brain and head for we know that from our hearts fights are wrong, so first use the heart.”

“If math studies give me more than I may give them, and it’s food for the brain, I consider it rather imperative to wonder also whether if I shouldn’t take a good food just because I have no idea about how digestion works, as an example, a general one, specially to consider generalizations in order to understand.”

“Sometimes putting parts of logical mathematical ideas or quotes in this case exemplifies that math unites the subtle of several faces of human knowledge.”

“If it’s essential to fight violence by first using the brain and head for we know that from our hearts fights are wrong, so first use the heart, especially for also generating new ideas together, and fight with proposals the given previous ideas as generalizations and make great own examples combined. Ramanujan was a great example to it, that the latter is the best weapon “

“I think, I live, thereafter I am, I learn and I live again……thus I celebrate myself and the world, and I celebrate the world, I think, I live, thereafter I am…. Existence.”

“Surprised that when being surprised and one discloses such face that conveys such emotion, either that face is for being too smart or too dumb and people who are too clever treat dumb people like dumbs in their faces and the fools don’t even realize that, whilst the wise ones say what they know subtly and the stubborns do not know what they are talking about?”

“From Alice in Wonderland: “Since it’s a mathematical novel, the more we find out the more math gives us and math gives us more than we may give to her, hence we are freer without being slaves to what we say but about what we ignore we are free and slaves….”

“Logics represents the mirror between the deep and high and metalogics stand for the whole scope.”

“Love cannot be defined, that’s a fact, because love is truth.”

“If love knows reasons that reason knows nothing of, then we partly know why love cannot be defined, that’s a fact, because love is truth.”

“It’s interesting that in math one should fight back with own examples, in war one shouldn’t take anything for granted, mathematically speaking with Differential equations one should have special care about strategies, but in music, math takes a different tonality.”

“I must also confess I chose math in part because in math, no matter how many surgeries, “autopsies.”, dissections and operations you make on theorems, lemmas, etc., they don’t suffer, on the contrary, the more they give you the more you enjoy it for you realize they may give you more than what you may give them, unlike biology.”
Me

“It’s funny that an artist´s job is in part to search for the truth but the art she/her produces may tell more about the truths and plain facts about her/him.

“I may tell the lady I love I love her more than she can imagine and I love her just the say she is.”

“The art of love is what defies our imagination even more than time and time itself.”

“The art of love is what defies our imagination even more than time and time itself, would love defy us? and most of all inspire us?”

“It’s interesting that humans are the beings that question themselves but commit the same mistake twice or more, many of those times on purpose, and in part is because humans as species consider themselves the center of the world, is it love???????.”

“I would tell my loved lady that I love her more than she can imagine, just the way she is, for I don’t abuse my imagination.”

“I love the woman I love beyond imagination because I don’t abuse my imagination.”

“Lovely that time but even more love defy our imagination for we are able to love someone without abusing our imagination just the way that person is.”

“By not abusing our imagination when we love somebody we feel more joy than we can imagine.”

“Our senses may feel and sense more than we can imagine despite our imagination being restricted to our senses biologically, naturally! and that’s what give sense to our lives, more than we can imagine.”

“To love with insanity is to love by not abusing one’s imagination which gives the best sense to our lives, more than we can imagine.”

“Because I would love her more than she can imagine for I love her more than my own imagination for she just the way she is way beyond anything I could possibly have imagined.”

“Because I would love her more than she can imagine for I love her more than my own imagination for she just the way she is way beyond anything I could possibly have imagined and the best, I would be dazzled very day more and more and more beyond my imagination for I would be falling in love for her every day anew.”

“The most beautiful woman I have ever seen, by looking at her the worst food would not matter and the most savoury food would not be sweet enough and not even comparable to her sight.”

“If thinking of sex all the time diminishes and shaves IQ, but thinking of war, fight, strategies, etc. doesn’t. It’s curious then that if I’m curious about how sex feels, in love that diminishes intelligence but thinking of a need like strategies in war, or a fight, etc., helps intelligence, being that most breakthroughs are made out from curiosity mainly.”

“Interesting that from my prior love quotes all can be reduced in a symbolic drawing with a triangle and a circle that unites her, me, God, our environment.”

“Romantically meaningful yet funny but since human imagination is limited to our senses, such that all we imagine comes from what our senses have perceived, and if our imagination were that great we would be able to imagine things that our senses haven’t sensed, such the beauty of the woman I love, beyond anyone’s imagination such that it would be really dumb not to even imagine that with such beauty I would fall in love again for, especially day after day.”

“It’s astounding for REAL how enslaved we are to what we say, even more about what we imagine and far more about amazement which makes us freer.”

“Words, math expressions and numbers cannot give a hint to define how beautiful the most beautiful woman I have ever seen is like.”

“If love knows reasons that reasons knows nothing of, for it brings happiness, then reasonably joy is to be found because of the clarity or lack to if when it comes to improve oneself and help the beloved one grow as well.”

“One cannot be in love with love let alone in love with the idea of being in love with love, for I love the part of love, which I not only search for the truth but I feel the truth and I find the truth better.”

“Enigmatic it is how we have imagination limited to our senses, but our analysis and ability of abstraction are in many imaginable ways, more than we imagine, whilst in our imagination we are able to conceive things that do not exist and not things that do exist that are beyond our understanding.”

“I could write quite a book with a huge abstract about how with a lot of abstraction and imagination one may be able to see something in an object and/or circumstance that goes way away from it and abstraction despite being far from imagination many times actually is the other side of the coin with imagination, for being so united and thus far away, yet abstraction defies imagination more than imagination defies abstraction but imagination is more important for the most.”

“Curious also that creativity to speak about abstraction and imagination is not as required as the right words in right place is, for imagination tends to be more important, more than we mostly imagine.”

“It’s such an artwork that the truth in part of an artist´s work is to find the truth but also to conceal the truth, improve it and even be able to tell lies in lots of camo.”

“Since it’s such an artwork that the truth in part of an artist´s work is to find the truth but also to conceal the truth, improve it and even be able to tell lies in lots of camo, one cannot make things up when it comes to write them down and render plain honesty, ironically now with creativity.”

“Funny but when I write down quotes and thoughts creativity may not be the most important thing but I do express my feelings.”

“Curious it is that abstraction inspires imagination and imagination inspires both intuition and abstraction, but memory inspires imagination from the lower level.”

“Is it too obvious that the too obvious makes the subtleness of obvious and obvious itself look overshadowed? How about reverse?”

“Funny that the pale overshadowed by light of knowledge and else…”

“Love is so obvious and so elusive, but not so obviously elusive.”

“This may be quite elusive but love is the most obvious of everything that makes us feel alive yet the most elusive because of that in part.”

“I had never imagined on its own, let alone how much imagination is defied by love and abstraction, which I love so much and makes me feel and think more.”

“It’s hard to imagine something that defies imagination more than love and abstraction, despite both being apparently two sides of a coin.”

“it’s not easy to find the creativity to account for it for imagination is basis to the top, and for this top? it would be the top not to find it.”

“I’m a slave to what I keep quite but when it comes to show love makes me free.”

“Quotes, the best way to be plain honest by talking to oneself, searching for the truth, the subtle form of art, with or without makeups and the maker must be able to tell for both.”

“I love math books more which have applications into finance, physics, etc., for this is something tangible and I love math books that have no applications on them because they show the pure math and fine part of the art of mathematics, same as I love books that are so complete that make me think and those that are inaccurate/incomplete that make me think.”

“Math count on us to be discovered for we can count on them, beyond what we may account for.”

“Mathematicians and own thinkers are amongst the freest people for everyone may COUNT on them and they may count on their own skills.”

“More than we imagine math defies our imagination, which is limited to our senses, that fact on its own (that our imagination is limited) makes us think about how limited our perception is, and how limited our understanding of the reality is, and about our deeds and actions, even our thoughts! I love Math because it’s the most graphic yet abstract way to show us all of that.”

“Blessed be more than they can imagine who give love and love doesn’t love them (about giving more and one may give or not) and those who do study math for real, for math gives them more than they can imagine.”

“I don’t fear fear itself so since it takes bravery to find out more and more about anything, I flee ignorance which I fear but I admit I have a lot the more I find out and I am brave to face the unknown.”

You may have faith, more than we may imagine in that:

“Everything is faith, more than we able to imagine.”

“Should people ask me why I study Math I reply: Why NOT? I study math because it shows me How everything works, and how is made from whys, so this takes me to: by what.”

“Some would have the faintest idea for others would have it very clear, and the first ones so clear that is so faint! Clearly faint!”

“Whilst some would have the faintest idea for others would have it very clear, and the first ones so clear that is so faint! Clearly faint! So blessed be those who faint out of surprise.”

“It may be quirky that we don´t actually chose who we fancy and love but we do chose to suffer.”

“It may seem really dumb to venture into something we don´t know where it may be taking us, but a lot dumber is not to dig into such venture.”

“The good thing about mountains is that in order to hike them we may dig more and more in order to realize what a distance we have from it to the sky and universe in terms of our ignorance)

“It’s easier to define Life with God than without God, paradoxically, if we had to put them both in a balance God is way more complex than ‘life.’”

“Allow the depths of knowledge sink you NOT out of vanity AND superficiality and the highness of wisdom belittle the importance of spirit.”

“Allow the depths of knowledge sink you NOT because of how belittled may seem the spirit out of superficiality and arrogance because of the highness of wisdom.”

“When I had problems in life I went into math deeper, for they gave me the most problems.”
(This cannot be said as such in Russian language.)

6. Jacobsen: Why are jaguars a fascination for you?

Navas: The animals, not the cars nor they war attack aircraft. Jaguars are mysterious, powerful, they particular spot pattern they have in their pelts as well as the orange-ish color on them make them look regal, elegant, beautiful as well as their particularly stocky and sturdy appearance that is not lean as that of a leopard (jaguars are lb by lb the most powerful cats) make them the most powerful cat in the Western Hemisphere. They are also among the few felids that love swim and swim very well! YES! Not all cats hate water and that makes them masters of virtually ANY ecosystem they live in and they reign upon. Even their mystery on its own is hard to describe, though we know that they are a key part of their ecosystem and more important than we had previously imagined.

7. Jacobsen: You have an adaptation on top of Kung Fu as well. What is the adaptation of this Kung Fu? What was the thought process behind the adaptations?

Navas: Kung Fu is not just a martial art, but it also is a way of life, an entire philosophy that has lasted for thousands of years. Kung Fu practitioners have millennia of style, tradition, techniques and philosophy and I must add that the very term Kung Fu means: Well done, to practice Kung Fu is to do something well. The branch I’ve most practiced in Shaolin style derivation, American style as well and Sanda, and Wu Shu has been the way I dare say, I have most used. We use the Ying Yang philosophy, of that there are two forces in the Universe, positive and negative. I have been into martial arts since 1993 when I first began in Tae Kwon do, my master was named Cesar Augusto Rodriguez, a world subchampion whose master had been Mr. Moon, who brought to Mexico. He was recommended by my beloved grandma who loved me so much. To Mr. Cesar Rodriguez I owe so much and he even invented me to appear in a magazine with him, which I agreed upon.

Eventually I turned to Kung Fu in light of its wide variety of techniques and being the most complete of all martial arts.

We are taught that we are to use our brains before using our body as arms. Someone who actually can fight avoids fighting at all cost, and fights unless it is the very last resource so we train in order to avoid fighting

I had rediscovered a Kung Fu technique I nicknamed “jaguar” but I made my own variant of it, an attack to the nape near the occipital bone in the skull, a deathly one and very painful. I discovered it by accident, and not because I practiced it on anyone, no sir! Heavens forsake! It was in a kitchen while accommodating goods from Wal Mart in the wooden table and below.

I have also designed Kung Fu weapons, talked to my fellow Kung Fu practitioners and masters and they quite rightly deduced such was a combination by all accounts of old Kung Fu “tools”, including forms and exercises to be used on, which I devised myself as well as well as the counter forms and counter exercises. Kung Fu is such a marvelous Martial art and the most complete, including in weapons, for which its virtues I must extoll. One of my weapons I named Korst, from Kill Worst, a contraction. I have been a master and a champion, though I seldom ever compete, despite quite a few invitations from my masters, mostly “Lalo” Rodriguez Pineda, and my arguments are that I don’t have anything to prove or show. Must I add that despite I’m no Buddhist, I do believe in Kung Fu meditation, and how it complements with Tai Chi Chuan, the slow movement yet not necessarily easier form to Kung Fu, both complementing one another like Ying Yang. When representing Ying Yang, I either draw just the black part or the white one, for when either being in light or darkness, one part shows and the other remains invisible merging with the environment, and making the other one, more evident.

Also, we know that we should be in equilibrium with the objects around us, for they haven’t harmed us, and to underestimate a foe in a fight, no matter if such foe is smaller, lightweight, old, etc… hence it is another reason why we avoid fighting for the most as we possibly can.

I must add that how we conceive cosmos in Kung Fu has partly and just partly inspired me in my conception of the Universe.

8. Jacobsen: How are humans like machines?

Navas: On the phone while talking in part I of the interview, I mentioned that machines, say computers, adding machines, etc… are totally unaware of themselves and even unaware of that they are able to perform large computations.

We humans are supposedly aware of ourselves, fact that casts us apart from the rest of animals

Sadly, the mass is easy to control, like robots

I must say I REALly like and see FIT how you accommodated this set of questions, for it shows key elements in the right place and TIME and good thing it was online, so to say a “place,” a linear dimension Internet being a virtual universe also, part from being a virtual Universe, is and a good proof of that machines shall never gain proper life, let alone a higher degree of intelligence than that of humans, mostly, HE!

You did recall I mentioned the year 2014, about my Multiverse theory, which does not entail TIME as a dimension being this a dimension not a bit but as a parameter, and that, we shall recall that time is not important, life is, speaking of my definition of life.

9. Jacobsen: What is the level of and kind of prostitution in America?

Navas: Prostitution in America is a lingering problem. Despite it being outlawed in all states except in about 8 out of 16 counties in Nevada, about 20% of men claim to have hired the service. Rhode Island had allowed it within the timeframe of 1980-2009. Puerto Rico, due to a staggering economy, in 2014 was about to allow it in order to prevent economic collapse provoking what is known as inceldom, being this an ideology that has led to waves of violence as well as mass scale assassinations nationwide in the U.S. It is also a major problem in the U.S. because a lot of prostitution is given by the massive entrance of illegal immigrants who hail from all over the world, from Mexico and Latin America upon the whole, Eastern European countries, a lot from Asia and Africa as well. Every state in the America has its own laws to ban and in the case of Nevada, regulate it and has worked to a large extent since the enactment of the Mann Act in 1910, speaking of Mann, manly law, oh man! Prostitution still is a largely practiced activity throughout the nation. Fortunately, though until recently, on April 11, 2018, the Congress of the United States approved an act, the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act, a.k.a. FOSTA-SESTA in order to severely punish online platforms that connected sex traffic, though in my opinion it has have success to some extent for the victims, sex slaves’ lives have been imperiled and since sex trafficking networks are huge and elusive, has become increasingly hard to arrest their members, traffickers, and pimps, meaning that certainly over 20% of men in the country have paid for sex. As for the part of the question of what types of prostitutions exist in America, I herein list them with a very brief description:

1) Street prostitution: Illegal throughout the nation, tending to be highly concentrated in a particular spot of blocks in especially larger cities. The most dangerous kind as such of prostitution in the U.S. for women, since they are not protected by any kind, 68% of them are known to have been raped, quite possibly more which is unknown due to the humiliation, fear and grief the victims suffer, with 82% reportedly having been physically assaulted. Over 20% of prostitution in America is within this type. Such slaves are taken into trucks, called lizard lots and they are given a radio or buds to communicate. There are two hierarchies on this, the indoor and outdoor workers. Indoor workers enjoy more freedom to choose their clients, while outdoor ones have far less freedom to choose and are far more susceptible to be robbed and seriously being physically assaulted, even kidnapped (over 20%, over 1 in 5!)

2) Brothel prostitution: Like street prostitution, since prostitution is outlawed in almost all America, this type is to be found in large cities and major highways where legal resorts like saunas, massage parlors and spas. Here many Asian immigrants are particularly often to be found.

3) Child prostitution: The most disturbing type of prostitution and the most alarming that about 100K children are forced to work in the country every year. These include not just national born children who, if detained, may go to juvenile and rehab facilities, unlike children who are brought from Latin America and Asia chiefly who are lied to by telling them they will have protection, temporary work visa, and many more benefits. Sadly, many of these children end up dead, their organs trafficked and even sent to countries as far as Central Africa, Middle East, Thailand, etc.…

4) Escort: Agencies that have both independent and directly being attuned to such agencies. Here, the profits vary according to the age, gender, location, ethnic background and types of service, as well as area or experience, closely related to type of service many times (e.g. magazine, podcast, etc.). Male escorts tend to charge less than a woman whose fee, in both cases, is paid in cash with often yet not mandatory tipping, although credit card payments is another choice, especially in large agencies. Nowadays with Internet access, when contacting the agency, the client may be allowed to search based on physical features and type of service being offered.

5) Red light districts: Found in places like The Block, Maryland (MD) and due to the zone in this case, other services are to be found near that place, like adult arcades in sex shops which abound there as well along with strip clubs where sex and peep shows are also available.

10. Jacobsen: What is the level of and kind of prostitution in Mexico?

Navas: I know far less about Mexico at that too. Mexico has had a big problem on prostitution since Aztec Empire, as described by orthodox Roman Catholics who arrived there and saw life in Tenochtitlan, the capital to Aztec Empire. Nowadays, child prostitution is a major type of such exploitation at which point it is called child sex tourism, being this a foremost spot on it along with Brazil, Cambodia, Colombia, India and Thailand. The numbers of such practice has been on the raise steadily, especially in recent years, to over 30 K children under the age 18 in such circumstance. Many of those children are taken to the U.S. via Ciudad Juarez, a border city between Mexico and the U.S. in the Mexican state of Chihuahua and are “stored” in places called maquiladoras. In Mexico’s largest city, Mexico City, from the 13K street children, 95% have been engaged into a sexual encounter with grownups, mostly via prostitution, and in one of the poorest spots in Mexico, Chiapas, illegal immigrants from Central and south America are particularly imperiled, like their children, where children are sold for $100 or $200 Mexican pesos, being this one of the worst places according to UNICEF and other institutions in terms of prostitution. Both, Mexican-born children and immigrants either legal or illegal are abducted and lured into prostitution. Other key spots for Child sex tourism (with tourists comprising people from Canada, United States and Western Europe) are Acapulco, Ciudad Juarez, Cancun, Tijuana, Puerto Vallarta, Cancun. Corruption is rampantly seen in this matter, for local authorities have allowed pimps to exploit children, for not just foreigners but also local authorities, police, business people and more sexually exploit them, clearly indicating that Mexico is a main provider of children and trafficking, but it’s not restricted to children but also to women and indigenous people, homosexual people as well and people with any type of disabilities like physical to mental. Regrettably, some shelters have allowed for sex trafficking as well, being also vulnerable to thievery, physical violence as well as recruiting from criminal gangs with the threat to harm their families. Mexico has been classified as “Tier 2” country for it does not meet the least required standards for the eradication of human trafficking.

11. Jacobsen: How do sexual trafficking networks function between the United States and Mexico (and Canada)?

Navas: By corruption and by apparently innocuous frames of saunas, massage, job opportunities. Unfortunately, Canada as you sure know better than I do how its laws work, 14 year olds are allowed to be into online sex trafficking and pornography, by law. Such allows for pimps in Canada to get 14 year olds and up into the country for such purposes.

12. Jacobsen: What are some effective ways to combat sexual trafficking and prostitution networks?

Navas: Creating conscience by talking to people and making social changes as well into the law like passing effective bills to prevent these atrocious practices from being performed, and this should be done in my opinion not just state by state (which works to some extent) but also laws enforced nationwide. Of course all of this takes time and work.

Jacobsen: How are human beings capable of a 5-8-dimensional conceptualization of the world and its relations?

Navas: Humans have 5-8 dimensions in their minds conceptually. Nonetheless the human, conceptually speaking, is unable to know about it, let alone conceive such dimensions. We humans are able to question ourselves and even change the environment for our needs (primitively anthropocentric), as well as being able to account for the past and future, as well as causes and consequences. We are able to classify, organize, think of like in sets for the most and distinguish patterns better than any other Earth creature (which is key to intelligence, to realize and distinguish patterns, but not everything that intellect is all about). Humans make machines perform myriads of operations. Such machines are unable to realize they perform them, unlike humans who are much aware of such operations, that they need them and what and how to do to achieve them, but humans are unaware of that they have 5-8 dimensions.

13. Jacobsen: How does this make humans apart from machines to you?

Navas: This is what I mean about humans being separate from machines, their ability to be aware of what they are, and operations, when needed, when by curiosity one performs them, how to compute them or what to do in order to get a certain result, like operating machines, making them work for us, and of course we depend on them. The paradox is that on this first level, human is apart from machines, but the human being unaware of that it has 5-8 dimensions, unites human somehow to machines, not just in intra-dependent a human is to them but on how at that basic scale human is unaware of such fact that helps make a difference from life to non-life, animate to inanimate.

14. Jacobsen: What is your theory of life? Or, what is life?

Navas: I have submitted my theory at UNAM and some biology teachers have availed it and I wish GIGA society to review it. It has to connect, so to say connect, I shall explain a better term in a little: biology, philosophy, social sciences as such. As I see it, life is communication, an extra-depending intra-connective communication. This makes the aforementioned branches communicated, ironically. We consider from an organ, an important one, like a heart, even if it has been careful taken care of and frozen in order to be used by somebody else in the near future, such heart must be intra-connected, self-communicated, depending also on the temperature, non-pathogen agents, and a life-span of the heart before it “expires” but if such heart has been cut off, it won’t help anymore. Bacteria, even the most adaptable one, require certain temperature and having had enough sunlight energy stored in their organisms, as well as many other organic components in the right proportion and quantity like Carbon, Hydrogen, Oxygen or not, Nitrogen, phosphate, etc.… but they must have a certain inter-communication in order to be able to survive. Even earthworms, if totally torn, would not be able to reproduce themselves, dealing of course with evolution, and how organisms adapt themselves to a certain environment, and so there can be life, there must be death, dealing with the so known life cycle of an organism: Birth, growth, reproduction and death, dealing of course with the survival instinct. An earthworm does not actually need and in fact needs another replacement from a different organism not. Naturally, this is how I see it, I’m open to know more and to correct if wrong, gladly, for this is a theory and just a theory, and in science as we know, what we once took as absolute truths and even part truths have been torn down and replaced, and that’s what makes science alive.

15. Jacobsen: How does this theory of life differentiate from machines, automatons?

Navas: Excellent question! A machine can get parts of its components replaced without problem, but they don’t reproduce, and are not communicated depending on certain outer agents like temperatures, they don’t feel anything within their hardware and would not have survival instincts and would NOT evolve on their own. Bear on MIND that, given how humans have 5-8 dimensions in their minds conceptually speaking and such having been given with evolution, a machine would never gain proper intellect, let alone become smarter than us.

16. Jacobsen: Who do you consider the smartest and most evil person in the history of the world?

Navas: The smartest person in history as far I go for could be either Leonardo da Vinci or Terence Tao.

Da Vinci was an extremely gifted man who was able to literally be centuries ahead of his day, and his inspiration chiefly came from mother nature, he was as well known is, a great polymath. He is the best example of that human imagination is limited to our senses, was our imagination as great and powerful, we would be able to imagine thing beyond what our senses have perceived. OK, at times we have in our bodies involuntary responses, not directly attuned to our spinal chord, like the arc reflex, the knee jerk test shows that. But with such he best did with his works, from artistic to natural, and both combined. Of curse he shows that our imagination, beyond being inconsistent, is conceptual. So, he is the best example we know of that our imagination is limited (great and best things rom it), going directly to conceptual without going through inconsistent actually, more than we can imagine!

Terence Tao, the American-Australian mathematician with 230 in IQ is anther great candidate. Mathematics are the best exam challenge to our imagination! I told you on the phone that mathematics is, along with logics, logically, the branches in human knowledge that most challenge our imagination AND, one cannot be ahead of the day as in virtually ALL other branches of human knowledge

As for the evillest person in history, to be honest the first example that came into my mind was Josif Vissarionovich Stalin for he killed his own people as well, beyond massive genocides he perpetrated and people he disappeared. It was between him, Adolf Hitler and Heinrich Himmler, for Himmler was the one who most devised and engineered Nazism as a system. A common pattern among these is that: They were smart people say with IQ between 130-145, just little below genius rank, who were rejects and had lonely lives and were opportunistic, as well as they had serious school and academic problems. Adolf Hitler did not even finish mid school and was a poor student. Stalin was expelled from his school, and Himmler, despite his dad was the headmaster to the college he attended, he was very lonely and let´s say he did not make them most of it. Naturally, another common pattern is the time in which they lived and the circumstances in human history they faced, as well as the place, in a certain creation in Europe they were born and raised, and somehow grew with a certain military tradition, to which they were very devout and outstanding.

17. Jacobsen: What is the most important aspect of the emancipation of women?

Navas: That women, being treated as equals as men by all accounts, I mean, rights and duties, that they should make the best of their abilities at work, school, home (having the same hierarchy as men) and society (no to be stigmatized and having the same voting and voice rights) at the same scope as men do, should also be treated gently, I mean, to have a special care about not hitting them, about giving them the right opportunities to keep working and have a salary and help from the institutions they work at while they are pregnant and give birth to children and they should be given protection from abusive guys who try to hurt them anyways by any mean. We all should remember that we all were given birth by women, we should respect them equally and be thankful to them for having brought us to the world. It is impossible to advance as society if we don’t act in gender equality, and this even goes, as I see it, like not even naming ladies after a man’s last name when married, for they are not properties nor they are belongings, instead an agreement should be reached by the couple.

18. Jacobsen: How can the religious traditions help in the furtherance of human rights?

Navas: I am sure that ever since people existed, at least most, prefer good over evil, and religion promotes good for most, like willing to not harm others, and do to others what you want for yourself, and helping the others, religion has to a large extent prevented a worse conduct from men to women an if church never was, but since religion changes, people change their views of religion, now women’s rights are being more protected by religion upon the whole.

19. Jacobsen: How can human rights be an important part of the advancement of women’s rights (as part and parcel of human rights)?

Navas: Women are just as humans as men are, same species, with feelings and sensitivity and same cleverness as men. They can by no means be casted apart from men in any way, rights of course, by any accounts. Ho can we see a human say 77% as worth as a man? No way!

20. Jacobsen: When do human rights and religious law come into conflict?

Navas: We humans primarily wish and want to be loved and accepted, to a greater or lesser degree and in different forms, though by this I also mean that one should bear on mind that one is not the center of the Universe, and certainly not as species in our planet, and that is a huge problem we have, we think we are the center of the Universe, if we are not even the center of the world as neither species nor as individuals. I said it in a specific order. Religion has changed, the way we see it and its teachings has changed, and it’s good to realize we are not the greatest creation on earth, hence it’s good at that point as I see it, o believe in a higher being. Humans OK may have to some extent interpreted a higher being on their image and likeness, but we know what is right deep down almost always, and we know that it’s not OK that women are seen and treated as lesser forms of humankind, they don’t like it and if we love, say a woman, from our mom, to a lady we fancy, if we love them, we want them to be happy, as happiest as possible, and have the same opportunities as we do. Religion may help at that, as Jesus once said: Do onto others what you’d want for yourself.

21. Jacobsen: What do you consider the source of morality? 

Navas: Not to do to others what we don’t want for ourselves, and we know it, and being congruent with it. It may be seen on religion, in philosophy, free thinking. Since I believe in a higher being, and we humans have goodness, even the worst person has goodness within, as incredible as it may read. We have that consciousness, that awareness, that feeling of that what we are ding is either right or wrong, it may be that tenuous connection humans have with such higher being.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Some claim him as the smartest man in Latin America to me: 193 (S.D. 16), or 1 in 323,940,499 people, on the Stanford-Binet.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Jaime Alfonso Flores Navas on Prostitution, Theory of Life, Women’s Rights, and Morality (Part Two) [Internet]. (2020, July 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/navas-two.

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Male and Female Ex-Muslims – Narrative Interpretation and Escape

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 1.A, Idea: The Tale of the Tribe: International Apostates

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: Apostasia

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: June 30, 2020

Issue Publication Date: TBD

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Once Per Year

Words: 783

Keywords: apostasy, ex-Muslim, female, Islam, male, narrative, Waleed Al-Husseini.

Male and Female Ex-Muslims – Narrative Interpretation and Escape[1],[2]

Waleed Al-Husseini founded the Council of Ex-Muslims of France. He escaped the Palestinian Authority after torture and imprisonment in Palestine to Jordan and then France. He is a friend. 

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Can you tell some of the stories, anonymous if need be, of some of women members of the Council of Ex-Muslims of France?

Waleed Al-Husseini: We get a lot of testimonies. One of the most touching was for a French girl. Her father is Algerian. Her mother is French. She was born and lived all her life in France. She questioned herself when she was forced to wear the hijab at the age of 13. She stopped playing with her childhood friends because it became a forbidden activity.

She used to, at that time, read from the holy texts of Islam. But then she became an atheist, but she still wore the hijab and lived with her family in an area full of Muslims. That is why even she cannot take the hijab off. She cannot tell her family that she left Islam. She supported us. She came to one of our meetings.

Another woman, she left Islam after the Charlie Hebdo attack. She was asking herself, “Why do we do this? Why do we live in a secular society and act like those who live in an Islamic state?”

She asked her family and others always she got the answer, “We are different. We always should belong to Islam,” until she started reading and knowing about me from my 1st book. She read it. She became an atheist. She really is a fighter for freedom.

Jacobsen: Can you tell some of the stories, anonymous if need be, of some of the men members of the Council of Ex-Muslims of France?

Al-Husseini: Men’s stories, it is rarer because Islamic society provides men all that they want. Their mistakes mean nothing. The stories, I have more from a refugee who came to France. There is a man. He is from Morocco. He started with freedom of women.

Then he went into the freedom of not taking part in Ramadan, but he was arrested. Then he got discrimination in the court. When he was out, he studied Islam very well, then he understood it very well. So, he left Islam for the same reason.

Jacobsen: I ask those two prior questions to provide a basis of the experiences of members, ordinary refugees or French citizens who are ex-Muslims, are apostates. How do these stories differ for men and women?

Al-Husseini: Most of the women, they left the suffering because of Islam. That is why they read and become atheism, so there is a clear reason for them. But for men, it is harder because he needs to be humanist and to do more reading to see how to become an atheist.

This is a difference between the stories of men and women. For sure, for women, it is clearer with hijab and with the ability to have freedom in life. So, they suffer more than men because of Islam. The space of freedom is much larger if you are me.

Jacobsen: Have the stories been getting better or worse in terms of the people who leave Islam?

Al-Husseini: Every story is a special case. But we still have a hard time, so the stories are always hard. It is not a fairy tale. We do not have happy ending stories because even for the ex-Muslims who leave their family.

They will have problems in work between their friends, so the stories still the same: worse.

Jacobsen: Thank you for the opportunity and your time, Waleed.

Image Credit: Waleed Al-Husseini.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, In-Sight Publishing.

[2] Individual Publication Date: June 30, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/male-and-female-ex-muslims-narrative-interpretation-and-escape.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, In-Sight Publishing, and Apostasia 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Concerns for Safety Among the French Ex-Muslim Community

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 1.A, Idea: The Tale of the Tribe: International Apostates

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: Apostasia

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: June 29, 2020

Issue Publication Date: TBD

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Once Per Year

Words: 874

Keywords: apostasy, ex-Muslim, Islam, Waleed Al-Husseini.

Concerns for Safety Among the French Ex-Muslim Community[1],[2]

Waleed Al-Husseini founded the Council of Ex-Muslims of France. He escaped the Palestinian Authority after torture and imprisonment in Palestine to Jordan and then France. He is a friend. 

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What do you see as the issue for 2018 and secularism in France?

Waleed Al-Husseini: For me, the most concerning issue in France at this time are the things that have been said by the president when he said that the state is secular, but the society is not. This is one of big things. We do not agree here.

Even French secularism cannot accept this because since the beginning, that society also incorporates secularism. If the society does not incorporate secularism, that means you will open the door more for Islamism (political Islam).

There will be more things like hijab and then separated sexes in the society, and make more of a micro-society within the larger society. One that does not integrate. Also, the president went to church and asked for church to be made into something political and then return things back between to the republic and church.

However, this also is a danger to open the big door for Muslim fundamentalists to come into French political life. These two issues, for me, are the most dangerous things done by president Macron. They are anti-secularism in France.

Jacobsen: It has been a while. What is the status of the Council of Ex-Muslims in France? Is everyone safe? Is the community growing?

Al-Husseini: Yes, we are all safe. I received more threats, but I am still alive. I founded one conference with ex-Muslims in Norway. It was good to speak about the right of blasphemy and what is going on in Europe and how things going on with isolation and other stuff.

So now in Norway, we got some ex-Muslims from Turkey and Pakistan too. It means we grow to be in most of the European countries and share the ideas because the situation is different from country to country.

Jacobsen: Any new books in the works coming around the corner?

Al-Husseini: My second book was published in France last year. I wish it would be translated into English because this one is important. I speak about the celebration of Islam radicals in Europe. I explain the strategy of political Islam.

I try to find solutions by explaining things like “Islamophobia” and racism and the using of these definitions to throw at the liberal society, and then using freedom for soft isolation from society. I would like to publish in English, but still, now there are no suggestions for translation.

Jacobsen: Can you recommend some books for people interested in learning more about the experiences of nonbelievers and ex-Muslims in particular?

Al-Husseini: The Blasphemer: The Price I Paid for Rejecting Islam, it is my book. The book of Ayaan Hirsi Ali called Infidel: My Life. Another book by Ibn Warraq entitled Why I Am Not a Muslim. These books are testimony and published in English.

We have others in other languages: French and German, but not English.

Jacobsen: As I have done several interviews and articles on and with the ex-Muslim community around the world. What is their primary concern regarding personal safety and getting their messages out to the secular, democratic world, which tends to be the Western world?

Al-Husseini: Yes, sure and thank you for all this work you do to help us reach our voice for more people. For us, yes, because we face the dangers there, we get killed or arrested without knowing about us.

That is why we try to make our voices heard more, especially for the Western world. Because the Arabic world doesn’t accept us. They do not have a democratic culture. For the Western world, to tell them, their people are leaving their region.

They will understand us because they face the problems of religion and dictators. All these reasons make us send these messages to them. Messages about our personal safety. This is our big problem. Anyway, it becomes a problem for anyone to speak about Islam or Islamism and the reason is clear as to why.

Jacobsen: Thank you for the opportunity and your time, Waleed.

Image Credit: Waleed Al-Husseini.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, In-Sight Publishing.

[2] Individual Publication Date: June 29, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/concerns-for-safety-among-the-french-ex-muslim-community.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, In-Sight Publishing, and Apostasia 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Gov. Ayade and Witch Burning in Cross River State

Author: Dr. Leo Igwe

Numbering: Issue 1.B, Idea: African Freethinking

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: African Freethinker

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: June 29, 2020

Issue Publication Date: TBD

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 678

Keywords: Ayada, Boki, Cross River State, Nigeria, Thomas Obi Tawo.

Gov. Ayade and Witch Burning in Cross River State[1],[2]

The refusal by the governor of Cross River state, Sen Ben Ayade to condemn the assault and burning of alleged witches in Boki Local Government of the state is deeply disturbing. His deafening silence over this tragic incident is indicative of a disgusting trend in Nigerian politics, and the pervasive incompetence, insensitivity and irresponsible governance that has plagued the country.

On Wednesday May 20, an aide to the governor, Thomas Obi Tawo (also known as General Iron) led a lynch mob that set ablaze 15 suspected witches in Oku community in Boki Local Government in Cross River state. On this fateful day, General Iron and his ‘boys’ stormed this rural community. They dragged out those who were identified as witches including General Iron’s mother and threw them into the fire. Three of the victims have died as a result of the burns. Others are at various hospitals and clinics battling for their lives. Some of the victims had serious burns on their legs, hands, heads, and their private parts. Some victims are unable to seat down or urinate. Others cannot walk or use their hands. Meanwhile, most of the victims are farmers and elderly persons.

It is unfortunate that for over a month since this horrific attack, Gov Ayade has not issued any statement to denounce this mob violence. He has not reached out to the victims to provide support. Instead, the government of Cross River is busy trying to cover up this atrocity and shield the perpetrators from justice. The government’s media spokesperson has denied that any member of the government was involved in the violence. So, is Gov Ayade saying that Thomas Obi Tawo is not an appointee with the Cross River state government? Is General Iron not his special adviser on Forest Security? There is nothing to gain from these media games and manipulation. In fact it is not too late for Gov Ayade to remedy the situation and demonstrate enlightened and responsible leadership.

Gov Ayade should not allow his political interest to overshadow his duty and responsibility to the people of Cross River state.  Ayade needs to take urgent steps to end impunity and witch persecution in the state. Cross River has been notorious for human rights abuses linked to witchcraft allegations and witch persecution. There are hundreds of street children in Calabar, the state capital, and most of them have been abused and driven out after being accused of witchcraft. Witch persecution persists in Cross River because the government has consistently failed in its responsibility to protect lives and property of alleged witches, as in the case of the Boki witch hunt. The government of Cross River has refused to prosecute and bring to justice those who engage in witch persecution and killing. Gov Ayade has an opportunity to rewrite history and turn a new page of hope, justice, and compassion. He should take all necessary measures to provide support to victims of witch-burning in Boki and bring to justice all perpetrators of this horrific crime.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, Humanist Association of Nigeria; Founder & CEO, Advocacy for Alleged Witches; Convener, Decade of Activism against Witch Persecution in Africa: 2020-2030.

[2] Individual Publication Date: June 29, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/gov-ayade-and-witch-burning-in-cross-river-state.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and African Freethinker by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and African Freethinker 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and African Freethinker with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  All interviewees co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

On Islam and Bloodletting in Northern Nigeria

Author: Leo Igwe

Numbering: Issue 1.B, Idea: African Freethinking

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: African Freethinker

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: June 28, 2020

Issue Publication Date: TBD

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,389

Keywords: African, bloodletting, Leo Igwe, Mubarak Bala, Northern Nigeria.

On Islam and Bloodletting in Northern Nigeria[1],[2]

Something is amiss in African religiosity and sense of piety because sometimes the African holier-than-thouness comes across as shocking and surreal. It is difficult to understand that Africans, in this case, African Muslims and to be specific Northern Nigerian Muslims could deem it fit and appropriate to kill or threaten to kill another African of the same faith or of a different faith or none for saying or writing something critical of Islam, Prophet Muhammad or the Qur’an.

And some Muslims have gloated over this. “We do not joke with our prophet. We do not joke with our religion”.  Others quipped: “We love our prophet more than our lives, more than the lives of our parents”. One imagines many more other Muslims nodding in sanctimonious approval.

Religion compels people to believe the unbelievable and to pretend to comprehend the incomprehensible. Religion makes people wallow in self-deceit and absurdities, motivating believers to commit horrible and atrocious crimes. The penchant for violence and bloodletting in the Muslim community has become mind boggling. Even as some Muslims continue to peddle the notion that Islam is a religion of peace. From all indications, this peaceful Islam has become elusive and flies on the face of reality and everyday life experiences in Northern Nigeria.

It is important to ask: what went missing in the religious formation and information of Nigerian Muslims who think it is acceptable to jail or spill the blood of a human being for saying something critical of a foreign religion, a foreign prophet, and yes a foreign deity? Look, this is not to say that religion is less superstitious if it is African; or that a prophet has more reverential capital if he is local or that a deity is less an imaginaire if it is African. No, not at all. All religions, gods, and prophets are of equal value. All religions, gods and prophets have as much worth as human beings invested on them. In fact all religions, gods, and prophets are worthless without human beings. Many Muslims may not subscribe to this proposition. They need not to. The fact remains that there is something out of synch in Northern Nigerian Muslim piety and sanctimoniousness. Bear in mind, the emphasis is on Northern Nigerian, not on all Nigerian Muslims. Nigerian Muslims are not monolithic. A relatively tolerant and more accommodating form of Islam or Muslimness is practiced in South-west Nigeria. Muslims in Northern Nigeria unlike their counterparts in other parts of the country take pride in a form of Islam that thrives on violence, intimidation, and bloodshed.

Islam is practiced in Northern Nigeria as if nothing else matters- as if humanity does not matter. Life does not matter. Nigeria does not matter. It is Islam or nothing. It is Islam or nobody. Islam in northern Nigeria is driven by nihilistic tendencies.

Of course, this narrative does not apply to all Muslims in Northern Nigeria- in Kano, Jigawa, Gombe, Yobe. Incidentally, Muslims of other climes in this part of the country have wittingly and unwittingly allowed this scorched-earth bloodthirsty form of Islam to overshadow and overwhelm them, and to become the face of Islam in the region.

Arabs introduced Islam to Africa to further their imperialistic political, economic, and cultural interests in the region. Arabs promoted Islam through scholarly teaching and preaching. They also used wars and violence, invasion, and annexation. Those who brought the religion of Islam to Africa killed and enslaved Africans. The real tragedy is not that the history of Islam in Nigeria, nay in Africa is characterized by violence and bloodshed, or that those who introduced Islam to Africa used or resorted to violence at some point. The real calamity is that African, Northern Nigerian Muslims use and resort to violence with impunity in promoting and defending this foreign religion. They kill and are ready to kill other Nigerians in furtherance of the Islamic faith, as an expression of Islamic piety or a habitual way to assuage their anger over any supposed insult on prophet Muhammad. What a shame! Northern Nigerian Muslims act as if they are entitled to violence, as if they have a monopoly of threat, force, and intimidation. The only way to be safe and to feel safe in northern Nigeria is to profess Islam even if it means threatening violence or engaging in religious bloodletting in the name of Islam, Prophet Muhammad or Allah. This is utterly outrageous and a scandalous manifestation of piety.

Muslims in Northern Nigeria need to be reminded that Islam is a foreign religion, Allah is a foreign God and Muhammad a foreign prophet. And nothing can change this fact or detract from this historical reality. The Arabic nature and culture of Islam are self-evident. Islamization is a form of Arabization. The Islamic religion has no more or less value than other religions, Allah than other gods, Qur’an than other sacred texts, prophet Muhammad than other prophets and messengers. Muslims may not or better will not agree to this. But this proposition is a fact. And look, there is nowhere in the Arab world that African religions and gods are recognized the way Arab religion, Islam, and Arab god, Allah are recognized in Nigeria. There is no Arab country where people worship African, Nigerian gods, and revere African Nigerian prophets as African Nigerian Muslims revere Islam and prophet Muhammad. Why? Muslims should point out anywhere in the Arab world that people are fighting and killing themselves over some supposed insult on an African deity, prophet, or religion as is the case in Northern Nigeria. Does that make Islam a truer, better, and more credible faith? Not at all.

Arabs, who brought Islam to Africa designated African religion as a false, ‘nonbook’ religion for a purpose-in order to impose their religious norms and cultural myths on Africa and Africans. And they succeeded in this task.

By getting Africans to embrace the misconception that Islam is a better religion, or rather the only true religion and Allah is the only true God and Muhammad the greatest messenger from God, those who introduced Islam to Africa made Africans imbibe and internalize their religious, cultural and prophetic inferiority. By making it a religious treason to question or criticize Arab cultural myths and dogmas, African muslims are affirming their intellectual inferiority?

Meanwhile, Islam is as superstitious and counterintuitive as the traditional African religion. There is nothing special about the Islamic faith and the Islamic prophet. In fact claims of an afterlife in paradise, the promise of 72 virgins, the existence of Allah and the jinns, the prophethood of Muhammad, the revelation of the Qur’an and other Islamic doctrines are like traditional religious beliefs matters of faith, not matters of fact.

Religious bloodletting will not change this reality or diminish the urgency and necessity to critically evaluate these claims.  Contempt for humanity that Muslims in Northern Nigeria have rampantly displayed does not add value to Islam or African Muslimness. Instead, it reinforces the notion that Islam is a violent religion and that Muslims are actual or potential terrorists. More so, any time Muslims in Northern Nigeria kill or persecute persons of the same faith, of other faiths or none in furtherance of the counterintuitive notions as in the case of Mubarak Bala, they reaffirm their socio-cultural, intellectual and religious inferiority.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, Humanist Association of Nigeria; Founder & CEO, Advocacy for Alleged Witches; Convener, Decade of Activism against Witch Persecution in Africa: 2020-2030.

[2] Individual Publication Date: June 28, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/on-islam-and-bloodletting-in-northern-nigeria.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and African Freethinker by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and African Freethinker 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and African Freethinker with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  All interviewees co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

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