Skip to content

An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two)

YoungHoon Kim United Sigma Korea Scott Douglas Jacobsen In-Sight Publishing President

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 20.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Sixteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: August 22, 2019

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 2,588

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract 

Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) is the President of United Sigma Korea. He discusses: intelligence and testing, rankings/listings, and societies, and their legitimacy compared to the mainstream of psychometrics; a new possible qualification of a high IQ listing or society; tests for a hypothetical IQ listing, qualification and disqualification criteria of the candidates, and other means of entrance into the listing; pluses and minuses of a listing of high-IQ people; issues with current intelligence tests by independent IQ test makers; fraud and egregious cheating in the high-IQ world and preventative and disciplinary measures; and future possible intelligence tests.

Keywords: giftedness, intelligence, intelligence tests, IQ, South Korea, YoungHoon Kim, United Sigma Korea.

An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities: President, United Sigma Korea (Part Two)[1],[2]

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Let us move into intelligence testing and ranks now, some rankings/listings and societies exist with online and independent psychometricians and psychometitors alone. What do you think about their legitimacy compared to the mainstream of psychometrics?

YoungHoon Kim: Aside from any independent psychometric legitimacy, I should say that we have to rely on and concede the result from the professional psychologist on the mainstream of the academic psychology and psychometrics; standardized intelligence tests, in case we refer to one’s intelligence estimate as much as accurate by the latest academic researches. As noted in my part one interview before, if high IQ societies or independent psychometricians no longer accept the validity of standardized intelligence tests, doubt or even deny the academic researches on the mainstream, I am afraid to say that, unfortunately, it is all pseudoscience not on any professional science. For instance, of what is different between science and pseudoscience is that we commonly agree science is based on the mainstream of the academic researches containing the rigorous procedure and method, but pseudoscience is not on that of necessary qualifications, even not agree on any science at some extent.

For pseudoscience of the independent IQ test or psychometrics, most importantly, all of their method or metrics rely on the inappropriate and preposterous correlation to the results from the mainstream. In other words, most of the independent psychometricians are convinced that their works are based on the sample of the standardized IQ test results. (Although, they used to deny the mainstream; their groundwork of the progress.) However, the serious matter arises here; in which each data on the whole correlation those amateurs claim is merely from the statement via an email conversation of their testee subjects, and they have never ever verified each data from their subjects for using their tests’ correlation to any other tests each amateur did not create which include the mainstream too.

Consequently, all of their correlations with the mainstream of psychometrics, by independent or amateur psychometricians, come to data rubbish, without respect of their severe shortage of samples compared to the countless mainstream samples. This would be, accordingly, enough to call them all pseudoscience against professional science. (Or otherwise, should we completely depend on amateurs’ honesty factor of their personality? The rest answer comes down to you.)

2. Jacobsen: Others exist with professional psychologists and mainstream tests limited to 4SD or one in 31,560. Still others, they work in the middle to various extents. If you could invent a new qualification of a high IQ listing or society at or above the top 0.1%, what would be the qualification?

Kim: Just so we know, strictly to say, the range over the four standard deviations, 4-sigma or 99.997th percentile out of the normal distribution on the unselected population, more depends on the estimate to evaluate each human intelligence level. Basically, every range of the intelligence level has a different extent of validity and reliability. More or less, when you get farther off the average level – mean IQ 100, you get looser justification of the estimate by degrees. This potential damage of validity and reliability would be detected on every territory in the field of evaluating human mentality.

Nevertheless, as we have knowledge that any IQ test does not directly refer to the human intelligence, there is a place to count the additional data or information when evaluating over the four standard deviation, 99.997th intelligence to extrapolate. The qualification for the additional data to estimate would be legitimate to set on which it contains the high education attainment and research achievement in real-world for those having the range at or above the 4-sigma level of intelligence, 99.997th percentile. This hypothetical qualification of the high Intelligence index or listing should be on what I elaborate above.

3. Jacobsen: What would be the tests included in this hypothetical IQ listing? What would disqualify candidates? What would qualify candidates? Could other qualifications or achievements earn individuals entrance into the listing?

Kim: Let me say one by one to your questions. Yes, it should be count not only the intelligence estimate from the standardized intelligence test by the mainstream, but also be incorporated each intellectual performance when evaluating particularly over the range of 4-sigma, and 5-sigma; IQ 164, and 175 on Wechsler scale, respectively. First, for the viable qualifications, the range over 4-sigma would require the standardized test score at least over 3-sigma, 99.9th percentile, on the full scale, in addition to the high level of educational attainment. Second, this could progressively apply to estimate the range of intelligence over 5-sigma level – five standard deviation. Technically, to estimate this serious range is indispensable to contain the result of the standardized intelligence test score minimum over 4-sigma on the full scale, along with its equivalent education attainment to the performance of the top-class scholastic test score, or world-class research product. Here, for sure this proceeding should be basically on the “estimate” (theoretical) and evaluating each person’s intelligence. In accordance with the meaning of a specific term – estimate, presumably it should not imply directly as fully accurate compared to the same level we calculate. However, it is also not invalid as a manner of measuring the human intelligence at or above the level of 4-sigma and further 5-sigma, which “theoretically” refer to the rarity out of around 1/3,500,000.

Put Statistically (and theoretically), further, we could have even 6-sigma level of the human intelligence, which rarity refer to around 1/1,000,000,000 in accordance with the whole of the human population. In this case, however, countless academic references and agreement from professionals should be inevitable to estimate the equivalent intelligence level theoretically on the 6 standard deviations, because there is no vehicle to evaluate that hypothetical level of the human intelligence by standardized or correlated ever since.

Likewise, for skepticism and criticism on the estimate over the range 5-sigma, it would be advisable to take account of the progress above. This procedure and consequence would be the same as the event probability in statistics. Depending on not only the IQ test by the mainstream, but also on the real-world achievement measurable by the strict academic criteria as such; very high scholastic attainment, profound research achievement or winner on the valid intellectual championships or competitions. What else do we have to count would be on the consistent and professional science and metrics, if any.

4. Jacobsen: What pluses and minuses come from existence on a listing of high-IQ people?

Kim: Considered the existence on a listing of high-IQ people has accounted a valid data based on science, we would be unable to grasp any dark side in it. Most importantly, it would be necessary to build an official listing of high IQ people, as mentioned, based on professional science. Even though we have countless media information published or disseminated to this day, apparently what they have done has been turned out false information or fake news; there is no official listing of the high IQ people.

For making this implement of hypothetical project successful, we must have professionals in the field of high intelligence based on academic science, but not upon any pseudoscience and dictatorship consisting of neither committee nor board of directors which all the existing listings of high IQ people, at the present, could be corresponded to what I point out – pseudoscience and dictatorship having nothing of any legitimate progress. For example, there is one IQ directory group in which their president used to conduct his pyramid scheme businesses via their unscientific IQ listing to get money on the one hand, and even to claim the possession of supernatural ability on the other hand. However, most of IQ people involved have not identified this truth, and still believe that false information. Sadly, the whole proponents of IQ listing stuff used to do what I point out. What should we do then? Now is the time to get out of the shadow of untruth, and to establish an official listing of IQ people with professionals whenever we get a chance.

5. Jacobsen: What are some issues with current intelligence tests by independent IQ test maker?

Kim: There are many controversial and contentious issues mostly because of ID verification, validity and denials of the mainstream caused by itself. First, most independent IQ tests have no ID verification operation. This is a fundamental dilemma. The independent workers don’t know where their data is from, since they have not conducted to verify testee’s ID. If then, how do we take it seriously when analyzing data?

Second, most independent IQ tests’ correlation are unreliable. Each conduct has not verified data from other test scores when compared. To say, independent psychometricians employ right after having the data from other test scores which their test takers stated in an email. However, if not verified this data, how do we know whether it is true or not?

Third, denial of the mainstream. Many of independent used to deny the mainstream psychometrics, but they present their statistics are correlated with the mainstream as some independent calculators have faith their tests are more accurate than the mainstream, and even accept only their test score in their society, disregarding the mainstream score. Presumably, this would be the hardest IQ question. No one could solve these ironical propositions.

6. Jacobsen: What have been cases of fraud and egregious cheating in the high-IQ world? What are preventative and disciplinary measures for known cases?

Kim: Most of the fraud and egregious cheating scores are commonly from independent intelligent tests; no ID verification, pseudo-correlations, and denial of the mainstream. The solution is to be scientific and to depend on the mainstream and professional psychology, and keep a distance off pseudo high IQ societies and Pseudo independent psychometrics. Speaking clearly, IQ by them is not the meaning of IQ that we know, but a kind of playing cards in Las Vegas.

7. Jacobsen: In the future with future scientific advancement and technological sophistication, what might an intelligence test become other than pencil and paper, or their base equivalents found online? Those possible uses of technology to precisely map an individual’s abilities and talents.

Kim: This could be the Science Fiction question. For not confused, then, it would be better to count to the near future just as in 30 years. Nevertheless, it would be impossible to find the valid tests online in that future, but if being scientific much more, as the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) has been calculated to IQ estimate in United States, then, with varying scope, the scholastic, academic, and research achievement measures of the human intellect, would be more recognized and calculated to its equivalent level of intelligence.

Some people could misunderstand that this is for something of discrimination, elitism, and narcissism. Absolutely not. If human intelligence is not subject to a portion of discrimination, then high IQ people are also not subject to discrimination too. It is just a difference like race, ethnicity, sexuality, homosexuality, and a diversity of religious beliefs. We know the human intellect only defines what the human is.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] President, United Sigma Korea – High IQ Society of the World Intelligence Network; Member, Olympiq society; Member, Mega Foundation; Member, Epimetheus society; Member, Helliq society; Member, Triple Nine Society (TNS); Member, International Society for Philosphical Enquiry (ISPE); Member, One in A THousand Society (OATHS); Member, Top One Percent Society (TOPS); Member, Mensa Korea.

[2] Individual Publication Date: August 22, 2019: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two) [Online].August 2019; 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2019, August 22). An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A, August. 2019. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2019. “An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A (August 2019). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘AAn Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 20.A (2019):August. 2019. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Mr. YoungHoon Kim (김영훈) from South Korea on High-IQ Rankings, Listings, and Societies, and Fraud, Preventing Cheating, and Possible Future Intelligence Tests in the High-IQ Communities (Part Two) [Internet]. (2019, August 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/kim-two.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Advertisements

An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 20.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Sixteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: August 15, 2019

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,827

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract 

Dr. Iona Italia is an Author and Translator, and a Sub-Editor for Areo Magazine, and Host of Two for Tea. She discusses: emergent of linguistic talent and capitalizing on it; a book published; and coaching people for writing.

Keywords: Areo Magazine, Book, Conatus News, Iona Italia, Language, Two for Tea, Uncommon Ground Media Ltd.

An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd.: Host, Two for Tea & Sub-Editor, Areo Magazine (Part Three)[1],[2]

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Let’s take a step back. We have some of the religious and ethnic background – Gujarat, Bombay, Zoroastrianism, Parsi. We also have some of the background with regards to the doctorate level research, earned, we should note, at the University of Cambridge, in English Lit.

Italia: In English Literature, yes.

Jacobsen: If we’re looking at the breadth of background, and a high-level education at one of the world’s most prestigious institutions, you also do translation work from Spanish and German to English.

Italia: That is correct.

Jacobsen: Most people cannot speak two languages or multiple languages, and at the level of translation, in a professional way. When did this talent emerge, and how did you find a way to capitalize on it?

Italia: I did German at school, and French. My French is not so good, though. I can converse in French, but it is not good enough to do translation. Then I learned Spanish when I moved here to Argentina, which was in 2006. I’ve been here, mostly, in Buenos Aires since 2006. I spent two years in India, and I returned in October of last year, from India. Most of the time, I have been here, in Buenos Aires. That is how I learned the languages. I also speak a bit of Gujarati. Those are my languages.

How did I develop the skill? I have had a misspent life in which I have made many bad decisions.

What happened was in 2006, I made this huge mistake. Up until then, I was a respectable member of society. I was married and living in London. I was an academic. I taught at the University of East Anglia. I taught 18th century English Literature at UEA.

2. Jacobsen: You published a book on it?

Italia: I published a book, yes. In 2003, I published my Ph.D. in book form. It was published by Routledge. It is still in print, but it is an academic book, so it is ridiculously expensive. It was mostly sold to libraries. It is called Anxious Employment, which, unfortunately, has become an extremely autobiographical title [Laughing].

In 2006, my then-husband and I both took a year out. I took an unpaid sabbatical from my academic job. Medics in the UK can get what is called a “work-life balance year”. He took a “work-life balance year.” We came here to Argentina because we both danced the tango. We were both passionate about dancing the tango. We came here to do an intensive year of studying tango.

At the end of that year, I really did not want to go back. At that time, I was married, and my husband earned a good income and he really enjoys his job. He works now in neuroscience research. He did some work here, and some in London. He went back and forth. I stayed here. We lived off his salary plus the rent of the London flat, which was also his flat.

I lived like that for a few years, and then, unfortunately, for reasons I am not going to get into, but I got divorced, which I was never expecting. Suddenly, I had given up my academic career, which was totally my choice, but it is almost impossible to go back to academe once you have left. I had no money because the flat does not belong to me. The money did not belong to me. I was in this completely penniless situation.

In fact, my ex helped me out for a little while I had no money and was trying to find my feet, but basically, I had to reinvent myself, so I decided to do something I could do online so I could stay in Argentina. I started doing translation work from German, at that time. I worked for a friend of mine who had a little, small translation company. I worked for him. I also taught tango. That is what happened.

My friend’s company, though, folded, and so I ended up with little translation work. I started also doing professional editing work. I do, now, editing for academics and fiction writers and people, freelance. I still teach a bit of tango. I am also doing the copy editing for Areo magazine. I am the subeditor of Areo. And I have a podcast.

That is what I am doing to try to make ends meet. It is only possible here. I would not be able to live back in the First World. That would be impossible on my salary. Here, it is possible. I am contemplating perhaps going back to India because I do not know that I can financially survive in Argentina. India is cheaper. My life has gone wrong, unfortunately, as far as professional achievements have gone.

I published a book on tango culture, which is called Our Tango World. I published with a small press in the UK, but it is not being marketed well, and so I do not think it has sold so many copies.

I would like to write a third book now. I made a start towards that. I am not publishing it as I go along, but I published a few small extracts. I also read and made a Youtube video of the preface to the third book, which is about mixed-race identities, which I am calling The Half Caste. That is the working title.

Jacobsen: You did some writings in Conatus News, now Uncommon Ground Media Ltd., on some of this.

Italia: Yes. I’ve written about 5 articles for Conatus News, and probably 12 to 15 articles for Areo. Before I had written all academic articles and the academic book, and a lot more creative writing about dance, which is what grew into the book Our Tango World. I write poetry and short sci-fi fiction. I would like to publish a volume of … I have a volume of short stories, which is unpublished.

But I had never written any political commentary at all until about two years ago. Then, Malhar Mali, who was the founder of Areo and the previous editor, was following me on Twitter. That time I had like 40 followers or something. It was tiny, but I used to write these long threads.

He liked my threads and my approach to thinking about things. He asked me to write a film review for Areo, as it was then, under the old gubernatorial period. I did and then I started writing more political commentary stuff. That is what has happened in my trajectory.

Now I try to do little bits of various things to keep body and soul together. I teach business English. I am, once a week, doing that. I have also, recently, been coaching people who are writing essays and dissertations for their MBA.

3. Jacobsen: How do you coach someone in terms of writing for an MBA?

Italia: I do not try to teach them the MBA material. I am not an expert on that; although, I have now read a lot of books about business, so that I, at least, can have some feedback as to what they are referring to. I try to help them organize their thoughts. I do not write the essays for them, but I help them create an essay plan.

A lot of people, first, are not sure what topic to pick. I help them to find a topic. Then I help them to structure it into a plan. I help them to think about what material they are going to use to illustrate their arguments there. Then I polish the prose. That is what it involves. It is essay coaching, but more specialized.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Host, Two for Tea; Sub-Editor, Areo Magazine.

[2] Individual Publication Date: August 15, 2019: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three) [Online].August 2019; 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2019, August 15). An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A, August. 2019. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2019. “An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A (August 2019). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 20.A (2019):August. 2019. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Dr. Iona Italia on Language, a Book, and Conatus News & Uncommon Ground Media Ltd. (Part Three) [Internet]. (2019, August 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/italia-three.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 20.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Sixteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: August 15, 2019

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 4,137

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract 

Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin founded the Prometheus Society and the Mega Society, and created the Mega Test and the Titan Test. He discusses: family geographic, cultural, linguistic, and religious background; depth of known family history; feelings about some distinguished family members in personal history; upbringing for him; discovery and nurturance of giftedness; noteworthy or pivotal moments in the midst of early life; and early aptitude tests.

Keywords: Giftedness, intelligence, IQ, Mega Society, Mega Test, Prometheus Society, Ronald K. Hoeflin, The Encyclopedia of Categories, Titan Test.

An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes: Founder, Prometheus Society; Founder, Mega Society (Part One)[1],[2],[3]

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

*Caption provided to the photo from Dr. Hoeflin in the third footnote.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: In due course of this personal and educational comprehensive interview, we will focus, in-depth, on the monumental life work of the (currently) 10-volume The Encyclopedia of Categories – a truly colossal intellectual endeavour. You founded some of the, if not the, most respected general intelligence tests in the history of non-mainstream general intelligence testing: The Mega Test and the Titan Test. Also, you founded the Mega Society in 1982. Another respected product of a distinguished and serious career in the creation of societies for community and dialogue between the profoundly and exceptionally gifted individuals of society. Before coverage of this in the interview, let’s cover some of the family and personal background, I intend this as comprehensive while steering clear of disagreements or political controversies between societies, or clashes between individuals in the history of the high IQ societies – not my territory, not my feuds, not my business. Almost everything at the highest sigmas started with you [Ed. some integral founders in the higher-than-2-sigma range include Christopher Harding and Kevin Langdon], as far as I can tell, I want to cover this history and give it its due attention. What was family background, e.g., geography, culture, language, and religion or lack thereof? 

Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin: I recently wrote a 51-page autobiographical sketch for inclusion in my upcoming multi-volume treatise titled The Encyclopedia of Categories, a 10-volume version of which will probably be available for free as ten email attachments by January of 2020. I was aiming for a 13-volume version, but I don’t think I can complete that length before the end of 2020. Given that my vision is way below 20/20, I liked the irony of publishing this final magnum opus of mine in the year 2020. I can always stretch it to 13 or more volumes in subsequent editions. I will not quote what I say in that autobiographical sketch, although the information provided will be roughly the same. My mother’s ancestors came from the British Isles (England, Scotland, and Ireland) mostly in the 1700s. My mother’s father was a hellfire-and-brimstone Southern Methodist itinerant preacher in the state of Georgia. He’s the only one of my four grandparents I never met. My mother brought me up as a Methodist, but I asked a lot of questions by my mid-teens and became a complete atheist by the age of 19, which I have remained ever since (I’m now 75). I gave my mother Bertrand Russell’s essay “Why I Am Not a Christian” to read aloud to me so we could discuss it. It seemed to convince her to give up religion, which shows unusual flexibility of mind for a person in her 50s. She had previously read such books as The Bible as History and Schweitzer’s Quest of the Historical Jesus, his doctoral dissertation in theology. My father’s parents came to this country in the late 1890s, his mother from the Zurich region of Switzerland and his father from the Baden region of Germany. His father was a pattern maker, a sort of precision carpentry in which he made moulds for machine parts to be poured from molten metal in a foundry. My father became an electrical engineer, initially working on power lines in the state of Missouri, then becoming a mid-level executive for the main power company in St. Louis, Missouri, doing such things as preparing contracts with hospitals for emergency electrical power generation if the main city-wide power cut off. He had worked his way through college by playing the violin for dance bands, and as an adult he taught ballroom dancing in his own studio as a hobby. My mother was an opera singer. In my autobiography, I list the 17 operas she sang in during her career, usually with leading roles due to the excellence of her voice. My father initially spoke German up to the age of 2, but his parents decided they did not want their daughter doing so, so they started speaking English at home, so she never learned German. My father’s mother became a devoted Christian Scientist and got her husband and two daughters to adopt this religion. My father became an atheist, and when he heard that my brother was thinking of becoming a Methodist minister sent him a copy of Thomas Paine’s book The Age of Reason, which promotes Paine’s deism, in which he accepted a deity and an afterlife but rejected the Bible as a guide, regarding the universe itself as God’s true bible. My brother never read the book but I did, and I told my father I enjoyed the critique of the Bible but did not accept a God or afterlife, and my father said that these two beliefs could readily be discarded, but that Paine should be given credit for his advanced thinking in an era and country that so fiercely rejected atheism. My brother ultimately became a computer programmer for the pension system for employees of the state of California. My sister became a ballet dancer for the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. I list 25 operas she danced in in my autobiography. She went on to teach ballet at an upstate New York college, being honored one year as the college’s most distinguished teacher.

2. Jacobsen: How far back is knowledge of the family history for you?

Hoeflin: I don’t know much beyond what is stated above. My sister has more detailed records. One of my mother’s grandfathers apparently owned over a hundred slaves in the South before the Civil War. My mother was occasionally treated badly in St. Louis due to her Southern accent, but she actually was very kindly toward black people and she once gave a black woman a ride in her car for a mile or so while I moved to the back seat. I do have memories of visits to my mother’s mother in Atlanta, Georgia. She died before my third birthday, but my memories go back much further than is normal with most people. I liked to swing on the swing in my mother’s mother back yard with one of her chickens in my lap. She raised the chickens to sell their eggs, but evidently also killed them for dinner. I am even now very tender-hearted towards animals and would never kill a chicken or cow or what have you. But I still do eat meat out of habit, even though I regard it as not very ethical to do so. If I had a better income I’d arrange to eat just a vegetarian diet, mostly fruits and oatmeal. I loathe cooked green vegetables except in soups.

3. Jacobsen: Some harbour sentiments and feelings based on distinguished family members from centuries or decades ago. Those who died with great achievements or honourable lives in the sense of a well-lived life – whether prominent or not. Any individuals like this for you? Any sentiments or feelings for you?

Hoeflin: A genealogist traced my mother’s ancestors to a close relative of a governor of Virginia. My mother said some of her relatives were distinguished doctors (M.D.s). I have a close friend who lives in Poland now, where she was raised, who is a great-great-great-great granddaughter of Catherine the Great (one of her great-grandmothers was a great-granddaughter of Catherine the Great). She shares a surprising number of characteristics that Catherine had despite the rather distant ancestry: a significant talent for learning languages, a love of art, an imperious attitude, and an embarrassing number of superstitions. I also dated a woman who was an out-of-wedlock daughter of Pablo Picasso, and there again there were striking similarities between the daughter and her father, even though she did not learn from her mother that he was her real father until 1988, some 15 year after his death in 1973. She started out as a virtuoso violinist, but by her 20s became a painter and had works of art in five different museums by the time she learned who her true father was. She also had facial features very much like Picasso’s, even though she was raised in a German family. I am proud that my mother and sister were so gifted in their respective arts (singing and ballet). When I drew up a list of my favourite classical musical pieces for my autobiography, I looked at YouTube to see the actual performances, and it struck me what a lot of amazingly talented people could perform these magnificent pieces of music, and I regret how limited I am in my talents. I can’t even drive a car due to my poor eyesight! It is chiefly or only in these incredible aptitude test scores that I seem to shine way beyond the norm. I read when I was in high school that the average high-school graduate could read 350 words per minute, so I tested myself, and I found that on a few pages of a very easy sci-fi novel I could read only 189 words per minute at top speed, which works out to just 54% as fast as the average high-school graduate. Yet on timed aptitude tests as a high-school sophomore, I reached the 99th percentile in verbal, spatial, and numerical aptitude despite this huge speed deficit. And on the verbal aptitude section of the Graduate Record Exam I reached the top one percent compared to college seniors trying to get into graduate school, an incredible achievement given my dreadful reading speed. As I mention in my autobiographical sketch, if I had to read aloud, even as an adult I read so haltingly that one would assume that I am mentally retarded if one did not know that the cause is poor eyesight, not poor mental ability.

4. Jacobsen: What was upbringing like for you?

Hoeflin: My parents were divorced when I was 5 and my mother went through hours-long hysterical tantrums every 2 or 3 weeks throughout my childhood, which were emotionally traumatic and nightmarish. My father had an affable and suave external demeanour but was very selfish and cruel underneath the smooth facade. My brother pushed me downstairs when I was 3 and I stuck my forehead on the concrete at the bottom, causing a gash that had to be clamped shut by a doctor. It was discovered that I had a detached retina when I was 7 (because I could not read the small print in the back of the second-grade reader that the teacher called on me to read), and I spent my 8th birthday in the hospital for an eye operation, for which my father refused to pay since he did not believe in modern medicine, just healthy living as the cure for everything. So even though he was an engineer, my mother had a more solid grasp of physical reality than he did, as I mentioned to her once. I flunked out of my first and third colleges due in large measure to my visual problems, but I eventually received two bachelor’s degrees, two master’s degrees, and a doctorate after going through a total of eight colleges and universities. So all in all my childhood was rocky and unpleasant. As an adult, I took the personality test in the book Personality Self-Portrait and my most striking score was on a trait called “sensitivity,” on which I got a perfect score of 100%. On the twelve other traits, I scored no higher than 56% on any of them. I never tried sexual relations until the age of 31, and I found that I could never reach a climax through standard intercourse. I had a nervous breakdown after trying group psychotherapy for a few sessions when the group’s criticism of the therapist after he left the room reminded me of my mother’s criticisms of my father, crying for 12 hours straight. When I mentioned this at the next therapy session, one of the other people in the group came up to me afterward and told me he thought I was feeling sorry for myself, despite the fact that my report to the group was very unemotional and matter-of fact, not dramatic. I accordingly gave up group therapy after that session. On the personality test, on the trait called “dramatic”, I actually scored 0%, probably because pretending to be unemotional discourages needling from sadistic people who love to goad a highly sensitive person like me.

5. Jacobsen: When was giftedness discovered for you? Was this encouraged, supported, and nurtured, or not, by the community, friends, school(s), and family?

Hoeflin: At the age of 2 my mother’s mother picked me up when I was running to her back yard upon arriving in Atlanta to grab one of her chickens to swing with it on my lap. At first I ignored her, but then I surmised that she wanted to ask me a question, so I looked at her face, waiting for her question, which never came. Maybe she didn’t realize that my command of the language had improved since my previous visit. She eventually tapped me on the head and told my mother “You don’t have to worry about this one, he’s got plenty upstairs.” My mother told me this story several times over the years, and I finally put two and two together and told my mother I recalled the incident, which shocked her considering how young I had been. I told her that her mother had probably been impressed by my long attention span. My mother then thought that the incident was not as important and mysterious as she has thought, but actually a long attention span at such a young age is probably a good sign of high intelligence. It was not until I was in the fifth grade that I was given aptitude tests and the teacher suddenly gave me eighth-grade reading books and sixth-grade math books. This was in a so-called “sight conservation class” for the visually impaired that I attended in grades 3 through 5. The teacher taught students in grades 1 through 8 in a single classroom because very poor vision is fairly rare even in a city as large as St. Louis, at that time the tenth-largest city in the United States. That gave me plenty of time to explore my own interests, such as geography using the world maps they had on an easel. In grade 8, back in a regular classroom, we were given another set of aptitude tests, and the teacher mentioned to the class that I had achieved a perfect score on a test of reading comprehension, meaning I was already reading at college level. The teacher gave us extra time on the test so I would have time to finish the test. A problem toward the end of the test clued me in on how to solve a problem that had stumped me earlier in the test, so I went back and corrected that previous answer. Then there were those three 99th percentile scores as a high-school sophomore that I’ve already mentioned. When I learned that my reading speed was so slow compared to others, I realized that my true aptitudes (minus the visual handicap) must be well within the top one percent on each of the three tests.

6. Jacobsen: Any noteworthy or pivotal moments in the midst of early life in school, in public, with friends, or with family?

Hoeflin: In the seventh grade I suddenly started creating crossword puzzles and mazes, a harbinger of my later creation of the two tests that appeared in Omni magazine in April 1985 and in April 1990. I also collected lists of fundamental things such as independent countries of the world, the Western Roman emperors, the chemical elements, the planets and their moons, etc., in keeping with my much earlier childhood ambition to know everything. If you can’t know everything, then at least know the basic concepts for important subjects like geography, history, chemistry, astronomy, etc. These lists were a harbinger of my current multi-volume treatise on categories.

7. Jacobsen: Were there early aptitude tests of ability for you? What were the scores and sub-test scores if any? Potentially, this is connected to an earlier question. 

Hoeflin: The only other test I should mention is the Concept Mastery Test. Lewis Terman collected a group of 1,528 California school children in grades 1 through 12 with IQs in the 135 to 200 range. To test their abilities as adults he and his colleagues constructed two 190-problem tests covering mostly vocabulary and general knowledge, which are easy problems to construct but are known to correlate well with general intelligence, the first test (Form A) administered to his group in 1939-1940 and the second one (Form B, latter called Form T) in 1950-52. About 954 members of his group tried the first one and I think 1,024 tried the second test. But Terman made the second test much easier than the first in order to make it easier to compare his group to much less intelligent groups such as Air Force captains. So the Mensa (98th percentile) cut-off would be a raw score of about 78 out of 190 on the first test and about 125 out of 190 on the second. I was editor for the Triple Nine Society (minimum requirement: 99.9 percentile) for a few years starting in 1979, and some members sent me copies of the two CMT tests so I could test TNS members. Since the CMT tests were untimed, I was not handicapped by the speed factor. Compared to Terman’s gifted group I reached the top one percent on both tests. According to Terman’s scaling of Form A, my raw score of 162.5 would be equivalent to an IQ of 169.4 (assuming a mean of 100 and a standard deviation of 16 IQ points), where an IQ of 168.3 would be equivalent to the 99.999 percentile or one-in-100,000 in rarity. By comparing adult CMT IQs with childhood Stanford-Binet IQs for Terman’s group, I calculated that my adult 169.4 IQ would be equivalent to a childhood IQ of 192. The one-in-a-million level on the two tests (the 99.9999 percentile) would be about 176 IQ on the CMT and 204 IQ on the Stanford-Binet, respectively.

The Guinness Book of World Records abandoned its “Highest IQ” entry in 1989 because the new editor thought (correctly) that it is impossible to compare people’s IQs successfully at world-record level. The highest childhood IQ I know of was that of Alicia Witt, who had a mental age of 20 at the age of 3. Even if she had been 3 years 11 months old, this would still amount to an IQ of over 500! At the age of 7, she played the super-genius sister of the hero in the 1984 movie Dune. On a normal (Gaussian) curve such an IQ would be impossible since an IQ of 201 or so would be equivalent to a rarity of about one-in-7-billion, the current population of the Earth. But it is well known to psychometricians that childhood IQs using the traditional method of mental age divided by chronological age fail to conform to the normal curve at high IQ levels. The Stanford-Binet hid this embarrassing fact in its score interpretation booklet (which I found a copy of in the main library of the New York Public Library) by not awarding any IQs above 169, leaving the space for higher IQs blank! The CMT avoids the embarrassment of awarding IQs of 500 or more by having a maximum possible IQ on Form A (the harder of the two CMTs) of 181. Leta Speyer and Marilyn vos Savant, both of whom I had dated for a time, had been listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as having world-record IQs of 196 and of 228, respectively, Marilyn having displaced Leta in the 1986 edition. Leta felt that the 228 IQ of Marilyn was fake, but I was aware that these childhood scores could go well beyond 200 IQ because they fail to conform to the normal curve that Francis Galton had hypothesized as the shape of the intelligence curve in his seminal book Hereditary Genius (first edition 1869, second edition 1892). I was unable to contact Alicia Witt to see if she would be interested in joining the Mega Society. I should note that the three key founders of the ultra-high-IQ societies (99.9 percentile or above) were Chris Harding, Kevin Langdon, and myself. Harding founded his first such society in 1974, Langdon in 1978, and myself in 1982. Mensa, the granddaddy of all high-IQ societies with a 98th percentile minimum requirement, was founded in 1945 or 1946 by Roland Berrill and L. L Ware, and Intertel, with a 99th percentile minimum requirement, was founded in 1966 or 1967 by Ralph Haines. I don’t care to quibble about the precise dates that Mensa and Intertel were founded, so I have given two adjacent dates for each. In its article “High IQ Societies” Wikipedia lists just 5 main high-IQ societies: Mensa, Intertel, the Triple Nine Society, the Prometheus Society, and the Mega Society (minimum percentile requirements: 98, 99, 99.9, 99.997, and 99.9999, respectively; or one-in 50, one-in-100, one-in-1,000, one-in-30,000, and one-in-1,000,000; dates founded: roughly 1945, 1966, 1979, 1982, and 1982; founders: Berrill and Ware, Haines, Kevin Langdon, Ronald K. Hoeflin, and Ronald K. Hoeflin, respectively.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, Mega Society (1982); Founder, Prometheus Society (1982); Founder, Top One Percent Society (1989); Founder, One-in-a-Thousand Society (1992); Founder, Epimetheus Society (2006); Founder, Omega Society (2006); Creator, Mega Test (April, 1985); Creator, Titan Test (April, 1990); Creator, Hoeflin Power Test; Author, The Encyclopedia of Categories; Ph.D., Philosophy, The New School for Social Research.

[2] Individual Publication Date: August 15, 2019: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

[3] Image Credit: Ronald K. Hoeflin. Caption: “Kitty porn? No, just the author and his pals.”

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One) [Online].August 2019; 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2019, August 15). An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A, August. 2019. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2019. “An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A (August 2019). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 20.A (2019):August. 2019. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin on “The Encyclopedia of Categories,” Family History and Feelings, Upbringing and Giftedness, and Aptitudes (Part One) [Internet]. (2019, August 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/hoeflin-one.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 20.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Sixteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: August 8, 2019

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 2,663

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract 

Pascal Landa is the Founder and President AAVIVRE (Association qui Accompagne la Volonté des Individus a Vivre selon leur Ethique – Association that Accompanies the Will of those wishing to Live according to their personal Ethics). He discusses: central opposition to the work of the right to die in France; religion and choice; and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry.

Keywords: AAVIVRE, dying with dignity, early life, euthanasia, France, religion, right to die, Pascal Landa.

An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry: Founder and President AAVIVRE (Association qui Accompagne la Volonté des Individus a Vivre selon leur Ethique – Association that Accompanies the Will of those wishing to Live according to their personal Ethics) (Part Three)[1],[2]

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Who has been central opposition to the work of right to die in France?

Pascal Landa: I think the central opposition has been multiple but similar to anywhere else that I can see. There are, obviously, the religious, who still have this belief that redemption comes from suffering, still have this belief that God has made you, and therefore you should not touch what God has made. You have no right to disturb. Et cetera. That is the religious communities.

You have also, I think, a big lobby from the financial groups. As I mentioned, the end of life is big business. If we start touching that and saying it is the individual concerned that decides, which we are doing more and more, financial groups could lose 30% to 60% of their revenues. We are recognizing that the individual has a right to say what he thinks is right about his health, but not yet to decide. That is starting to pose problems for those who are using us as test cases for their drugs or for their equipment. The equipment makers, for example, the sophisticated scanners, or the expensive drugs; some drugs cost more than $100,000 a month for the person to take for cancer. Those people are saying, “If we let people decide when they want to die, we won’t get the last 6 months where we can test equipment and amortize it”.

Basically, today, the medical profession just has to say “We are trying to keep Mr. Landa alive a little longer.” Who can object to that? And yet, in reality, more than 50% of even the doctors say that of operations and medical acts realized in the last 6 months, 50% of those acts are totally useless.

If 50% are totally useless and this represents billions of dollars, well, A, as good managers and caretakers we should be eliminating those useless acts. B, those medical industries impacted need to invest differently to maintain revenue. C, we should be re-allocating that money to preventative care, to the kind of care like dental care, eyeglasses, … the kind of care that is going to make that the individual lives better. The lobbies I believe are still today over influencing our legislators.

Religion, finance and thirdly the fact that we are directed by people who are old. People who are old are of a generation that has basically played the game of, “I am not going to die. Never. I am going to stay forever young,” like Bob Dylan sang; the myth of that kind of culture.

This is less the case with the younger generation. A little bit less. When elected, people get into positions of power, voting law for the right to die with dignity means that they must confront themselves to their own death, and they can’t escape it. That is a difficult thing if they’re not properly prepared to face their own destiny.

I think those are the three major reasons. You could also say that now, there are multiple cultural phenomena that join religious concepts. I know in France, for example, the Muslims and the Catholics are against it, the religious authorities, not the individuals, but the religious authorities are basically against it.

The religious authorities used to shut their eyes on the fact that priests were violating young kids. Things change. We are starting to see that issue come out of the woods. Well, we’ll see death come out of the woods at some point, as well.

2. Jacobsen: In the United States, there’s a group called “Catholics for Choice”. The group focuses on pro-choice policies and implementation and initiatives, and programs, and so on. One thing that came through in an interview with the president of the organization was the split between the Roman Catholic Christian hierarchs, even with the pope putting out these turgid encyclicals, and then the laity, where if an advanced industrial economy and an accessible, the women will get contraceptives and reproductive health in spite of those dry encyclicals.

Landa: Absolutely. In France over 60% of “Catholics”, people who claim to be Catholics, are for legislation that allows medically assisted dying at the request of the individual.

There’s something else that deserves to be mentioned. If you lived as close as 50 years ago, we considered the elders to be people with wisdom and with things to teach us and things to tell us about.

But the world since 1950 has been speeding up at the rate of what we call, “Moore’s Law”. Initially, it was computer science that moved at that speed for the first 20 or 30 years but since the 21st-century computerization has entered the life of every profession, of the activity of humankind, we are moving at an incredible pace.

That means that the old people are less competent than the new ones at an ever-increasing pace. Especially since the old people are getting older and even older since we started prolonging their lifespan. That means that when you need to deal with society, need to deal with major issues like climatic change or human welfare, the knowledge of the elders is no longer relevant because the world has changed too much. It is the knowledge of those that are 30, or, 40, or 50 that is pertinent, or even 20 to 30.

I think that this is a major change in our society and a big change in everyday life. We are still living under the old habits of thinking that the old are wise. We are being led by people who are 60 or often much older, which is ludicrous. We can see that when you get a person like Barack Obama or Macron in France. Their vision and comprehension of things compared to guys like Trump or Bush illustrates the generation gap. It’s not only age, more a question of mentality.

Most of our elected representatives, at least in Europe- I think it is getting less and less so in America- have traditionally been old people. We speak of the “old Europe”. Society needs to go at the same rhythm as the rhythm in which jobs change and the rhythm in which discoveries are made, and the rhythm in which processes and methodology and everything that makes modern life. Difficult to face this everchanging world for most people. Hard to manage a society which is condemned to change or else to be obsolete.

Ecological concerns are part of that process. We are still living in a world that considers that nature is here to serve us. If we do not start thinking that we are a partner of nature, and no longer the oppressor of nature, then we are not going to survive, ourselves. Then we have got a real problem.

This thing about the old people directing the world or at least being in positions of importance is a real the handicap for moving forward, and for the right to die with dignity, of course.

3. Jacobsen: I like an easy argument for what you have presented. It goes like this. It is basically an argument for age independence of wisdom or correct views of the world. If an individual is 15 and they believe in Young Earth creationism, that person ages 60 years. Now, they’re 75-years-old. They’re still a Young Earth creationist. Does this ageing make Young Earth creationism any more correct?

Landa: Of course not.

Jacobsen: In that way, I think it is with wisdom as well.

Landa: For me, what you are touching on is the fact that one of the things that we have lost in the last 40 years, is we have lost the respect for philosophy. Poetry, which has been the mouthpiece of emotions, philosophy, which has been the mouthpiece of values. Those are things that through zero and one of the computer ages, we have put aside, and considered were unimportant.

I am absolutely convinced that we will soon be coming back to that because we must face a certain number of issues which can only be solved by respecting emotions, philosophy, intellectual honesty.

Those issues are all linked to Quality of life. A good illustration of this is the “augmented man” debate. Today, we can put an electronic piece in a person’s brain and enable him to drive mechanical arms. Today We are able to replace the leg of a guy, that got amputated and put in a leg that makes him run faster than a human being. Today We are able to make a human being see in the dark where he couldn’t see before, through the red-light spectrum.

The augmented man is clearly “more powerful” than the natural man. We can see that in those people who have used cocaine. Cocaine allows you to be more efficient, more effective- amphetamines as well, but only for a certain period. It destroys you, but “economic society” does not give a damn about destruction. Remember, the only law of nature is self-reproduction.

We are facing with the augmented man a new big dilemma. Is being human a specific value or are we just on the verge of a new evolutionary landmark, the meeting between the organic world and the mineral world of computer chips. Remember, silicon is a mineral, right? What we are discovering is that the organic world augmented by the silicon world, organic and mineral, is more powerful and more capable of dealing with things that either the organic or the mineral world, by itself.

What We are maybe experiencing is a whole new evolutionary process, where man will no longer be what we know as man, homo sapiens, but he will be “homo mineralis”, and we will replace defective parts either by organic or mineral elements either to correct of to improve the individual. As a joke, I suggest to manual workers (cooks, plumbers, woodworkers, gardeners…) that they could use 6 arms like Shiva!

Look at how many people are being, today, surgically modified to look better. Millions, and young people. How many people tomorrow will say, “Put a chip in my arm. That way I can go and pay without having to bring out my chip card. I can go to the night club and be recognized like in Mexico” How many people will say, “Put a chip in my brain? I am going to be much more intelligent when plugged into the internet.”

When you look at big data, imagine having the knowledge of the world as part of yourself. Observe how we already react today. Today, if I ask you a question and you do not know the answer, what do you do? You go on the Internet and you find the answer. Big data could be implemented in your head so that whenever you think of something, you go to big data to get it. That is a real possibility.

The question is, “What is it to be human?” Where are the emotions in this? Where is the philosophy? At what point do you say, “Whoa. I am being manipulated.” At what moment in time do you enter the perfect world of Hitler with his blonde, blue-eyed perfect race? In the world of Google, Apple, Microsoft etc., where if you do not accept “cookies” (electronic spies) then you are simply excluded from the joys of the NET. Look at the Japanese creation of an electronic pet or the proposed inflatable sexual objects with sensual electronics. Those are the issues that face you in which we as old people can contribute by giving perspective … a little bit. But the real issue is for you the individual to act upon daily.

The biggest revolution in the next 40 years is going to be the medical revolution. In 40 years, we’ll look at medicine as practiced today and consider it the same way as medicine was practiced in the 1700s.

Your lifespan as a 20-year-old born in the year 2000 is most likely going to be 150 years. It is no longer 100 years. My life expectancy is probably 100 years. My father’s life expectancy was probably 50, 60 years. We are in an incredibly revolutionary world.

Any other questions? I seem to be making you perplexed. [Laughing]

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder and President AAVIVRE (Association qui Accompagne la Volonté des Individus a Vivre selon leur Ethique – Association that Accompanies the Will of those wishing to Live according to their personal Ethics).

[2] Individual Publication Date: August 8, 2019: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three) [Online].August 2019; 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2019, August 8). An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A, August. 2019. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2019. “An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A (August 2019). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 20.A (2019):August. 2019. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Pascal Landa on Right to Die France, Collective Religion and Individual Choice, and Philosophy, Wisdom, and Poetry (Part Three) [Internet]. (2019, August 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/landa-three.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 20.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Sixteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: August 8, 2019

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 2,195

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract 

Dr. Sarah Lubik is the Director of Entrepreneurship, SFU Co-Champion, Technology Entrepreneurships Lecturer, Entrepreneurship & Innovation Concentration Coordinator, Innovation and Entrepreneurship. She discusses: the next big trends in technology innovation and the impact on North American lives into the future; personalized medicine, Moore’s Law, The Law of Accelerating Returns, Ray Kurzweil, Hariri, and X Prize founder Peter Diamandis, and the future of technologies; and an impressive entrepreneur and entrepreneurship from Canada.

Keywords: Canada, entrepreneurship, Yuval Noah Hariri, innovation, Peter Diamandis, Ray Kurzweil, Sarah Lubik, science, SFU, technology.

An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry: Director of Entrepreneurship, SFU Co-Champion, Technology Entrepreneurships Lecturer, Entrepreneurship & InnovationConcentration Coordinator, Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Part Five)[1],[2]

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What do you think is the next big trend in technology innovation? What will impact North American lives the most as a technology and as an industry in the next ten years?

Dr. Sarah Lubik: To be totally honest with you, our ability to predict what’s going to happen in the next ten years has gotten worse and worse because humans tend to think only in a linear way, but technology is moving faster and faster.

We need to be mindful that technology is not a single thing anymore. That technology underpins, whether we like it or not, everything that we do. So, what that means is that, when we look at some of the fastest-growing businesses in Canada.

they don’t say they’re in the tech sector, but they’re heavily underpinned by tech. So, something that’s an HR company, but online, may be underpinned by a business model that means I can access a great deal more data than anyone else because of the technology they use, for example, employing artificial intelligence or machine learning.

Things that claim to be health companies are often technology companies now. One of the trends we’re going to see is that we’re going to need tech in education systems and in businesses that have traditionally just been about having highly trained people. For example, if easier tasks can be automated, the people in those jobs are going to need new skills and hopefully, have the mindset to learn those skills.

In the next ten years, I would hope to see changes to the health system, and to health innovation and to the energy sector.

One of the interesting possible advantages I’ve heard health entrepreneurs talk about for Canada is that we have an opportunity as a country with a single healthcare system.  If we can organize it properly, that would make us a fantastic place to innovate in areas like personalized medicine, which is where a great deal of interest is. That could mean nationwide improvements to health through the use and integration of health better data.

Where these things are coming together will be places with the need for other technologies, and so, we are back to comment about interdisciplinarity. This is going to a place where material science meets big data meets genomics meets personalized medicine, meets social innovation and more.

So, this is why those skills and that mindset can be so important because you can only imagine the things are coming out now. I was reading in the New Scientist there is always some new use for technology that could have serious implications for the world and the economy. For example, tracking your health so precisely your watch knows when you’re going to get sick before you do.

So, it can alert you that you’re starting a fever before you feel anything. So, those are the places where all of those technologies come together and that’s the part that much excites me. So, I’m not sure that I can say what you would see in ten years. I keep being surprised, thinking, “What will come out now?”

2. Jacobsen: Much of the subject matter you’re touching on now, such as personalized medicine, is a big trend, also one minor phenomenon, but growing among people that were previously on the fringe.

So, some of the names that come to mind would be people that talk typically about information technology along Moore’s Law, The Law of Accelerating Returns, for instance, of Ray Kurzweil, as well as the X Prize founder Peter Diamandis.

Do these people have an influence on your view of where the future of these technologies will go?

Lubik: Ray Kurzweil does for sure. He speaks often about how human beings usually think in a linear fashion, which is fine for simple things but not for envisioning the future.

But if you look at technology and innovation, it happens exponentially. So, when it comes to my teaching, I’m increasingly asking people to think not what’s happening now. But can you try to forecast where things are going to be when you’d actually be in the market? How about past that?

One of our alumni who now works for a big European company heading up their cloud division because, back in the day in Vancouver, he sat down and thought to himself, “What will the next big thing be?”

Then he’d heard about the cloud. He started a company based on the technology, sold the company, now runs those divisions in large firms.

There’s an ambition that comes with that, which is that whatever happens, it’s going to be bigger and faster than you think. So, to be aware of that and excited about that, those people with those mindsets are going to be the ones to watch

That said, I’m also influenced by the work of Yuval Noah Harari, who wrote Sapiens.  He cautioned that humans don’t usually see the repercussions of our actions when we innovate and we often make further problems for ourselves, so it’s important to realize there may also be negative consequences to innovation, too, and think about what they can be and what we can do about them.

3. Jacobsen: Who’s an entrepreneur in Canada that impresses you? Either the scale of their industry that they possibly founded, the product that they’re selling that might not be large, or the way they are able to collaborate with a broad swath of different industries to bring about their vision?

Lubik: Oh wow! That’s an excellent question. Who impresses me? Oh! So many people, but still, I’d like to try and pick a famous star in the sky. People impress me for a lot of different reasons. Greg Malpass who is the CEO of Traction on Demand, which is one of the fastest-growing companies in Canada and based here in Vancouver.

He’s an SFU alumnus. He impresses me with both the vision he has for his company and the humility with which he leads it. So, it’s not all about him. It’s about creating this environment and creating a fantastic workplace in the place that he lives and grew up.

They also started Traction for Good, which is the arm of Traction that tries to do good things in their communities. I’m impressed with having a locally created, growing company that hasn’t lost sight of why it’s doing what it’s doing.

That it is part of its community and wants to give back and create those great jobs. Greg has been vocal about not having interest in selling the company There are not many players that grow to that size and remain independent rather than selling.

Then I have early-stage entrepreneurs who impress me as much as the big companies.

They impress me with their vision and with what it is they want to achieve in the world. a few years ago we had a team from the Technology Entrepreneurship at SFU program made up of entrepreneurship students and mechatronics engineers Their goal was to create a hearing device that doesn’t require an audiologist and can be self tuned because people in developing countries have so little access to hearing care.

They were inspired to create a solution because trouble hearing isolates you from your community and your family. So, they were interested in figuring out how you create a business model that lets you go into the world with a product like that and move it into the places in the world that need it the most, not necessarily the places in the world that’ll pay the most for it.

So, I’m impressed with the many early-stage companies. I’m also impressed with the late-stage companies. There’s a number of Internet of Things companies that are doing incredible things. I might be spoiled for choice at the moment.

Then I’m always impressed by social movements and by the people who want to make systems change because those companies have fantastic potential. For example, people trying to take charge of their own genomic information for health.

There are those movements within the research that are all so intriguing. As to where is this going to go next, I’m impressed with people who are creating non-humanoid robots realizing that our first interest in robotics seems to be building machine versions of ourselves.

For example, you see marine biologists working with engineers, working with artificial intelligence, in order to do things like U-CAT (Underwater Curious Archaeology Turtle). They realized that for underwater archaeology, using drones with propellers meant moving too fast to properly scan what’s happening in the sea.

So, they created a robot with flippers that swims like a turtle. Then looks for anything that’s out of the ordinary, then goes and investigates.

I mentioned that to a friend of mine who works here in the environmental physiology lab.

She told me that researchers are thinking of using something like that to explore water moons on other planets. All of a sudden you realize quite how far this research can go when we collaborate across fields.

So, I suppose that’s one of the greatest things about the job that I have is I get to hear about these things and watch people do them and help where I can.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Director of Entrepreneurship, SFU Co-Champion, Technology Entrepreneurships Lecturer, Entrepreneurship & Innovation Concentration Coordinator, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University.

[2] Individual Publication Date: August 8, 2019: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five) [Online].August 2019; 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2019, August 8). An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A, August. 2019. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2019. “An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A (August 2019). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 20.A (2019):August. 2019. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Dr. Sarah Lubik on Technology Innovation, Kurzweil and Diamandis and Hariri, the Future of Technology, and Canadian Industry (Part Five) [Internet]. (2019, August 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/lubik-five.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 20.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Sixteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: August 8, 2019

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,758

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract 

His Lordship of Roscelines, Graham Powell,earned the “best mark ever given for acting during his” B.A. (Hons.) degree in “Drama and Theatre Studies at Middlesex University in 1990” and the “Best Dissertation Prize” for an M.A. in Human Resource Management from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England in 1994. Powell is an Honorary Member of STHIQ Society, Former President of sPIqr Society, Vice President of Atlantiq Society, and a member ofBritish MensaIHIQSIngeniumMysteriumHigh Potentials SocietyElateneosMilenijaLogiq, and Epida. He is the Full-Time Co-Editor of WIN ONE (WIN-ON-line Edition) since 2010 or nearly a decade. He represents World Intelligence Network Italia. He is the Public Relations Co-Supervisor, Fellow of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, and a Member of the European Council for High Ability. He discusses: issues VI and VII; the production methodology and design of WIN ONE; and more content of the publication issues.

Keywords: AtlantIQ Society, editor, Graham Powell, WIN ONE, World Intelligence Network.

An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE: Editor, WIN ONE & Vice President, AtlantIQ Society (Part Six)[1],[2]

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: We examined, in part or in brief, issues I (Florian Schröder)II (Florian Schröder)III (Florian Schröder)IV (Owen Cosby), and V (Graham Powell). Let’s move the sixth issue and the seventh issue, all editorial work in future issues done by you, so no parenthetical explicit mentions needed now. Issue VI was about half the size of the bumper issue, but substantially larger than the other editors’ issues too. 

By the sixth issue, WIN reached a staggering 170 countries. The content included commentary on different strengths of learners in different areas including verbal and visualization, auditory and visual, awareness of space and time, whole versus sequential apprehension, eureka versus linear learning, and more. It’s a nice point-by-point breakdown. 

Other parts included a nice homage Sudoku puzzle, different forms of visual art productions, announcement of a prize winner, poetry, commentary on signification and African-American or black literary expression in America in addition to the Afro-American culture, and concluding with more work on contemplation and eudaimonia (well-being or happiness in the broadest sense, which was another long think piece).

What was the frame of mind for this issue?

Graham Powell: The new format and layout was proving popular, for the reasons already stated. The sixth edition was entirely my own work, as far as editor and illustrator was concerned, plus I put in an essay based on Dr. Elisabetta Basciu’s research, which I had access to. I translated it and made a summary, the sub-motive being a piece which was primarily about literature which had not been discussed previously within the magazine. I wanted to appeal to a broader ethnic group and be didactic too. Your comment about the WIN reaching 170 countries at that point gives credence to this notion of appealing to a broad audience, especially as anyone can access the magazines on the WIN website!

2. Jacobsen: For issue six and seven, what is the production methodology for these issues? How did you produce the design – e.g., the color scheme, the font, font size, and so on – for these issues? Why choose those as the format and that as the production methodology?

Powell: The fundamental colour scheme derives from the cover, the subsequent pages taking on the background colour used for it. I like to use my own photos, especially for the cover, or, as used for the sixth Edition, a beautiful writing paper design which I bought in England. The font has generally been size 12, which is quite easy to read. I also set my target to have at least 40 pages, this being achieved during most of the WIN ONE productions. This is in line with the AtlantIQ Society magazine, which is now called Leonardo. It also has at least 40 pages to each edition. I find the inclusion of photos during essays makes the magazine very much better to read. It also clarifies matters from time to time, or at least makes it more ‘human’ – the reader can see the person being talked about, or who has produced the primary source. The choice of font is usually for clarity, or it combines well with the cover design. Occasionally the font is varied slightly due to typesetting considerations, basically, a case of ‘fitting it all on the page’. Laying it all out on a contents page has also been appreciated, according to feedback. Feedback has also meant encouraging debate, some people contacting me to ask if they can discuss, even dispute things in the magazine. Of course, as long as it is ‘civil’, I encourage that.

3. Jacobsen: Issue VII covered a different set of topics. These were intended to “incite people to comment on the opinions offered.” As can be seen, the content ranges from an argument against “at least one type of God,” two poems by you, a psychological self-analysis, a series of 50-word stories, a “neoclassical criticism method” applied to the Second Gulf War “Ultimatum Speech,” a scholarly look at the conceptualization of truth by Heidegger, and more. 

These move into a puzzle, a cutesy introduction to literary terms in a sketch-based cartoon, reflections on Aristotle and Martin Luther King, Jr., some further commentary on Ishmael Reed, clips of dialogue over coffee at the el Lugar Stop & Shop. What particular articles or publications produced the most waves based on the introductory letter at the outset of the seventh issue?

Powell: It is said to be the sign of intelligence that different views can be held in the mind whilst not agreeing with any of them. There were some contentious opinions raised, in my opinion, from the content commissioned for this Edition, so I anticipated responses by ‘opening the door’ to further comment. I was also beginning to write more and more of the magazine using my own material, or I had to create some in order to achieve the target 40 pages of content. I was trying to encourage more people to give opinions, and hence, give content. In the end, it took a couple more editions to stimulate a little dialogue between Phil Elauria and Claus-Dieter Volko. The ‘waves’ produced were really more of a personal nature, the production of the magazine stimulating me to research more and more and to broaden my intellectual horizons. This edition also forged my friendships with Tahawar Khan, Paul Edgeworth and Eric Trowbridge. Much of this edition went on to appear in the WIN book “The Ingenious Time Machine” – which came out on Amazon this year. That was the biggest post-publication ‘wave’, alongside the presence of the WIN at the 12th Asia-Paciic Conference on Giftedness, which I helped organise in Dubai in 2012. Much of the credence for the WIN’s presence at the conference stemmed from the production of the WIN ONE. Evangelos gave a presentation about the WIN; I spoke specifically about the WIN with reference to the WIN ONE production. It also gave us more opportunities for photos, which had not been the case since Owen Cosby’s edition. These photos appeared in subsequent editions of the WIN ONE and the hierarchy of the WIN increased via the addition of Dr. Manahel Thabet as Vice President. By the end of July 2012, we had a revamped WIN which was looking to expand its influence on the high IQ milieu.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Editor, WIN ONE; Text Editor, Leonardo (AtlantIQ Society); Joint Public Relations Officer, World Intelligence Network; Vice President, AtlantIQ Society.

[2] Individual Publication Date: August 8, 2019: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six) [Online].August 2019; 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2019, August 8). An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A, August. 2019. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2019. “An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A (August 2019). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 20.A (2019):August. 2019. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Graham Powell on Issue VI and Issue VII, Production Methodology and Design, and Published Content of WIN ONE (Part Six) [Internet]. (2019, August 20(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-six.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 20.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Sixteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: August 8, 2019

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 3,127

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract 

Krystal Volney is the new Journal Editor of United Sigma Korea. Volney is known for her computing interviews for WIN ONE Magazine (World Intelligence Network) as a tech writer, Co-Editor and publications in Award-winning/bestselling educational books that can be found in bookstores and libraries around the world, journals, blogs, forums & magazines such as Thoth Journal of Glia Society and City Connect Magazine since 2012-present. She is the author of Cosmos and Spheres poetry book and the ‘Dr. Zazzy’ children’s series. She discusses: writers and fans; early life; general giftedness; talents in writing and poetry; Nancy Drew Files, the Babysitter’s Club, Goosebumps, the Sherlock Holmes Series, and The Famous Five; children’s poetry, the environment, fashion, and romance; human beings exemplifying both emperor butterfly and monarch butterfly characteristics; identifying with the floral; hibiscus flowers and tiger lilies; and Claude Monet, Emily Dickinson, Mozart, and Van Gogh.

Keywords: editor, Krystal Volney, United Sigma Korea, WIN ONE, World Intelligence Network, writer.

An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents: Author & Editor, WIN ONE (Part Two)[1],[2]

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: As with many writers, fans emerge. Who is Jessica? How did Jessica come to run a fan site for you, if you happen to know this? The link to the website can be found here: https://www.blogger.com/profile/02970796058419170292.

Krystal Volney: I don’t know of a fan named Jessica. I would like to though.

2. Jacobsen: What was early life like for you? 

Volney: My early life was very restricted as I had a very strict upbringing. I wanted to fit in with my friends so I rebelled against my parents and was closely associated with a pedophile best friend like a ‘Second mother’ as she was trusted who took me places as well to see my ‘friends’ but it was manipulation on her path. How could a pedophile have honestly wished well on me or been like ‘second family’ truly? She wanted me to be a failure in life and be a menace. When I look back at my childhood, I want to inspire children out there and let them know how important it is to tell their parents, guardians or family if someone is child grooming or sexually abusing them even if it means that they would be controlled more. My childhood abuser did not want me to tell my teachers, family, friends or parents and wanted me to see her as my ‘best friend’.

3. Jacobsen: When was general giftedness discovered? What was the reaction of family and friends? Was this nurtured or not?

Volney: Honestly, I am an aspiring polymath and studied various subjects at university but in my opinion, I would have to be like Leonardo da Vinci whose areas of interest included invention, drawing, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography to truly accomplish my goal as an astonishing genius. I know that general giftedness can mean anything once you are outstanding in your respective field such as fashion, the Social Sciences, Medicine, the arts, music, Computing and the list goes on.

4. Jacobsen: When were talents in writing and poetry discovered? What was the reaction of family and friends? Were these nurtured or not?

Volney: When I was 20, I became a poet and I grew to love English, American, French, Caribbean and Russian Literature from reading as an autodidact. In my first poetry book Cosmos and Spheres, I was influenced by William Shakespeare and Lewis Carroll.

5. Jacobsen: How did the Nancy Drew Files, the Babysitter’s Club, Goosebumps, the Sherlock Holmes Series, and The Famous Five influence you?

Volney: I loved those books as a child. Every Friday after school, I would go to the mall and purchase a new Goosebumps book or one of the books from the Famous Five series. Enid Blyton was a grand influence on my sense of belonging in the world as I loved stories about adventure, the dog Timmy and the character Georgina known as George. I was a tomboy as a child like many people who grew up in this way so I related to her character in the book. My favorite book from the series was ‘Five on Kirrin Island again’.

6. Jacobsen: Your subject areas of interest are children’s poetry, the environment, fashion, and romance. Why those particular areas?

Volney: I like trying new things and to me, writing about those subject areas interested me so much that I dedicated my first book of poetry to them.

7. Jacobsen: You consider human beings exemplifying both emperor butterfly and monarch butterfly characteristics. How? Why those examples and not others?

Volney: Emperor butterflies are easily recognized because of their lovely, iridescent blue wings. Monarch butterflies are the loveliest of all butterflies, some say, and are viewed as the “king” of the butterflies, hence the name “monarch”. I compare humans to these type of butterflies because I believe that most people have a story to tell in life and are conflicted. It’s my opinion that people have stages that they go through like butterflies and in the end their experiences make them beautiful as well as mature people like these insects.

8. Jacobsen: At age 21, you identified as a floral character. What does this mean now? What have been some of the metamorphoses over time for you? Any re-evaluation of personal character representation now?

Volney: I saw myself as bright and new, like the flower in the spring at age 21. I used to be easily bothered by what people thought of me, but for years now; I’ve become nonchalant telling myself their opinions don’t matter and the fact that people had negative things to say about me means they obviously feel disheartened by something about my character. There are those so wicked and spiteful that they mock modesty like the ‘branches’ in the ‘Flower poem’ and still want to stand out as something greater than your existence. Most of the time people hate on others because they want what they have, for themselves or they see you as their competitor. You asked what have been some of the metamorphoses over time for me. I can safely say that I’m much older and wiser now than I used to be. I’ve been through a lot of pain and hurt in my life that has shaped who I am today.

9. Jacobsen: Why do hibiscus flowers and tiger lilies better represent the meaning of a lady and a woman to you? In general, why flowers?

Volney: I am a big fan of flowers. Although I grew up as a tomboy, I loved all types of flowers especially hibiscus, white roses, Jasmine, orchids and tiger lilies. They are so beautiful to me is why.

10. Jacobsen: How were Claude Monet, Emily Dickinson, Mozart, and Van Gogh influential on you?

Volney: There is poetic, musical, and painting art. I love those people’s works because I can relate to them. Claude Monet was one of the best artists in the world to me because of his painting style of the landscape and of feminine things. Who can’t relate to Emily Dickinson? Her poem “I’m Nobody! Who are you? Are you – Nobody – too?”; many poets would be able to understand her message and this could be interpreted in many ways. I love her sarcasm. Mozart’s music is breath-taking as well and Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’ piece is one of my favourite choices of art in contemporary society.

References

[BookVideos]. (2013, September 26). Cosmos and Spheres Poetry Book by Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEt22Sx-iEI.

[BookVideos]. (2019, April 26). The Flower Poem by Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p_-aiAs0SkM.

AbeBooks.Com. (2019). Cosmos and Spheres. Retrieved from https://www.abebooks.com/9781466908871/Cosmos-Spheres-Krystal-Volney-1466908874/plp.

Airbit. (2019). Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://airbit.com/profile/KrystalVolney.

Allfrey, P.S. (1980). Hurricane David: the skeleton of a survival tale. Retrieved from https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=&httpsredir=1&article=1064&context=kunapipi.

Amazon.Com. (2019a). Cosmos and Spheres. Retrieved from https://www.amazon.ca/Cosmos-Spheres-Krystal-Volney/dp/1466908874.

Amazon.Com. (2019). Phyllis Shand Allfrey: A Caribbean Life. Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Phyllis-Shand-Allfrey-Caribbean-Life/dp/081352265X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=.

Amazon.Com. (2019). Thomas J. Hally. Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Thomas-J.-Hally/e/B005WLA28M%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share.

Amazon.Com. (2019b). Cosmos and Spheres. Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Krystal-Volney/e/B008JBYVC0%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share.

Amazon.Com. (2019). The Shillingfords of Dominica and their Family Tree: With Notes on the Dominica Taverniers. Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Shillingfords-Dominica-their-Family-Tree/dp/1985780291.

Barnes & Noble. (2019). COSMOS AND SPHERES. Retrieved from https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/cosmos-and-spheres-krystal-volney/1109698279.

BOL. (2019). Cosmos and Spheres. Retrieved from https://www.bol.com/nl/f/cosmos-and-spheres/9200000005007764/.

Booksamillion.Com. (2019). Cosmos and Spheres. Retrieved from https://www.booksamillion.com/p/Cosmos-Spheres/Krystal-Volney/9781466908871.

Coleman The Group. (2019). Coleman The Group. Retrieved from www.colemangrouptt.com.

Daynco Limited. (2019). Daynco Limited. Retrieved from https://dayncoltd.com.

DESIblitz. (2017, November 27). British Library Exhibition for Mughal India. Retrieved from https://www.desiblitz.com/content/british-library-exhibition-for-mughal-india.

Dymocks.Com. (2019). Cosmos and Spheres. Retrieved from https://www.dymocks.com.au/book/cosmos-and-spheres-by-krystal-volney-9781466908871.

eBay. (2019). Dr. Zazzy Saves Christmas by Krystal Volney Miss (English) Paperback Book Free S. Retrieved from https://www.ebay.com.sg/itm/Dr-Zazzy-Saves-Christmas-by-Krystal-Volney-Miss-English-Paperback-Book-Free-S-/380905810826.

Elite High IQ Society. (2019). Paul Edgeworth. Retrieved from https://www.eliteiqsociety.org/apps/profile/134808474/.

Fashionaires Model Agency. (2019). Fashionaires Model Agency. Retrieved from https://www.facebook.com/Fashionaires-131449506689/.

FictionDB.Com. (2019). Dr. Zazzy Saves Christmas – Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://www.fictiondb.com/author/krystal-volney~dr-zazzy-saves-christmas~814830~b.htm.

Gerken, K.J. (2014, March 9). MARCH 2014 ISSUE OF YGDRASIL. Retrieved from https://canada.johntext.de/tag/krystal-volney.

Goodreads.Com. (2019a). Cosmos and Spheres. Retrieved from https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/10302153.

Goodreads.Com. (2019b). Krystal Volney > Quotes. Retrieved from https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/4602107.Krystal_Volney.

Google Books. (2019). COSMOS AND SPHERES. Retrieved from https://books.google.ca/books/about/COSMOS_AND_SPHERES.html?id=koC648K7rX8C&redir_esc=y.

GRIQ Society. (2019). Massimo Cliaro. Retrieved from https://gr.iqsociety.org/members/massimo-caliaro/.

HolmesACourt.Com. (2016, April 11). Josephine Allfrey. Retrived from www.holmesacourt.org/hac/3/6910.htm.

Insgain.Com. (2019). Krystal Volney (@krystal_volney_). Retrieved from http://www.insgain.com/user/krystal_volney_/2954215183.

Instagram.Com. (2019). Krystal_Volney_. Retrieved from https://www.instagram.com/krystal_volney_/?hl=en.

ISFDB Science Fiction. (2019). Award Bibliography: Krystal Volney. Retrieved from www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/eaw.cgi?270246.

Jacobsen, S.D. (2019, April 22). An Interview with Graham Powell on WIN ONE, Contributors, and Selection (Part Two). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/powell-two.

Kobo. (2019). Cosmos and Spheres. Retrieved from https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/cosmos-and-spheres-2.

Laurent, N. (2016, May 8). Nina Survived Child Abuse And Is Telling Her Story To Help Other Survive As Well. Retrieved from www.antoinespeaks.co.uk/this-woman-suffered-from-child-abuse-but-is-telling-her-story-to-give-advice-on-how-to-stop-it-and-help-other-victims/.

LinkedIn.Com. (2019). Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://www.linkedin.com/in/krystalvolney/.

Lulu.Com. (2019). Dr. Zazzy Saves Christmas. Retrieved from http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/krystalvolney.

Mandy. (2019). Antoine Allen. Retrieved from https://www.mandy.com/actor/profile/antoineallen#.

Maria Regina Grade School. (2019). Maria Regina Grade School. Retrieved from www.mariaregina.edu.tt.

MDC (Metal Designs & Concepts Limited). (2019). MDC (Metal Designs & Concepts Limited. Retrieved from https://www.mdc-um.com.

Medical Associates Hospital. (2019). Medical Associates Hospital. Retrieved from www.medicalassociatestt.info.

MySpace.Com. (2019). Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://myspace.com/krystalvolneyjapan.

One Great Family. (2019). Henry Alfred Alford Nicholls. Retrieved from https://www.onegreatfamily.com/fh/Henry-Nicholls/603343518.

Oxford Theatre Review. (2019). Krystal Volney. Retrieved from oxfordtheatrereview.co.uk/p/UH3BkL3URcy_pBdOXDx6yg.

Paravisini-Gebert, L. (1996, April 1). Phyllis Shand Allfrey: A Caribbean Life: Page 11, Empress Josephine. Retrieved from https://books.google.ca/books/about/Phyllis_Shand_Allfrey.html?id=Ybump8V_hmoC&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=empress%20josephine%20uncle&f=false.

Paravisini-Gebert, L. (1996, April 1). Phyllis Shand Allfrey: A Caribbean Life: Page 12, Marianne Felicité. Retrieved fromhttps://books.google.com/books?id=Ybump8V_hmoC&pg=PA11&dq=marianne+felicite&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=marianne%20felicite&f=false.

Picdeer. (2019). Krystal Volney. Retrieved from www.picdeer.com/krystal_volney_.

PoemHunter.Com. (2019). Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://www.poemhunter.com/krystal-volney/.

Rizzoni’s Ristorante Italiano. (2019). Rizzoni’s Ristorante Italiano. Retrieved from https://www.rizzoni-italiano.com.

Robinson, D. (1986, May 15). BYU’s Angel(a). Retrieved from https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=336&dat=19860515&id=peRNAAAAIBAJ&sjid=SYQDAAAAIBAJ&pg=3259,6287685&hl=en.

Safeway Access and Support Systems Limited. 92015). Safeway Access and Support Systems Limited. Retrieved from www.safewayaccesstt.com.

Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association. (2019). 2019 Rhysling Award Candidates For poems published in 2018. Retrieved from https://www.sfpoetry.com/ra/rhyscand.html.

Seelal, N. (2003, June 2). Shot five times, jumps 20 feet to escape. Retrieved from https://archives.newsday.co.tt/2003/06/02/shot-five-times-jumps-20-feet-to-escape/.

SheWrites.Com. (2019). Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://www.shewrites.com/profile/KrystalVolney.

Siegmund, M. (n.d.). I.Q. 160-179 Exceptionally Gifted 180+ Profoundly Gifted?. Retrieved from tetworld.tripod.com/gifted.html.

St. Dominic’s Children’s Home. (2019). St. Dominic’s Children’s Home. Retrieved from https://www.bordeglobal.org/dominic/index.php.

Stuart, A. (2011, May 16). Josephine: The Rose of Martinique: Empress Josephine. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=5tSq5awNgXUC&pg=PA1&dq=phyllis+allfrey+empress+josephine&hl=en&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=phyllis%20allfrey%20empress%20josephine&f=false.

Stuart, A. (2011, May 16). Josephine: The Rose of Martinique: One, Childhood by Phyllis Allfrey. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=5tSq5awNgXUC&pg=PA1&dq=phyllis+allfrey&hl=en&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=phyllis%20allfrey&f=false.

The Barbados advocate. (1951, March 2). The Barbados advocate ( Friday, March 02, 1951 ). Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098964/02522/2j.

The Enid Blyton Society. (1938). The Secret Island. Retrieved from Retrieved from https://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/book-details.php?id=289.

The Glasgow Herald. (1983, August 18). George bridges a 26-year gap in his athletics career. Retrieved from https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2507&dat=19830818&id=wMFAAAAAIBAJ&sjid=66UMAAAAIBAJ&pg=5100,3607284&hl=en.

The Nobel Prize. (2019). All Nobel Prizes in Physics. Retrieved from https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/lists/all-nobel-prizes-in-physics.

ThriftBooks.Com. (2019). Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/krystal-volney/2453750/.

Trafford Publishing. (2019). Trafford Publishing. Retrieved from https://www.trafford.com.

TRINRE Insurance Company Ltd. (2018). TRINRE Insurance Company Ltd. Retrieved from https://www.trinre.

Twitter.Com. (2019a). Krystal Volney: @KrystalVBooks. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/KrystalVbooks.

Ultra-Pharm Marketing Limited. (2019). Ultra-Pharm Marketing Limited. Retrieved from https://www.ultra-pharm.com.

United Sigma Korea. (2019). Krystal Volney: Journal Editor, USK (Editor, World Intelligence Network). Retrieved from https://unitedsigmakorea.org/organizer/.

Volney, K. (2019, July 13). Album. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/pictures/2850.

Volney, K. (2013, December 1). Art, Philosophy and Poetics. Retrieved from https://wsimag.com/feature/6341-art-philosophy-and-poetics.

Volney, K. (2014, March). Art, Philosophy and Poetics. Retrieved from users.synapse.net/kgerken/Y-1403.pdf.

Volney, K. (2019). Calendar. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/calendar.

Volney, K. (2012, June 20). Chronicles of Caniche. Retrieved from www.relatemag.com/tag/krystal-volney/.

Volney, K. (2011, February). Cosmos and Spheres. Victoria, BC: Trafford Publishing.

Volney, K. (2013, November 7). Dr. Zazzy Saves Christmas. Valley, California, US: CreateSpace Publishing.

Volney, K. (2014, March). For the elderly. Retrieved from users.synapse.net/kgerken/Y-1403.pdf.

Volney, K. (2014, June 1). For the Elderly. Retrieved from https://wsimag.com/feature/9440-for-the-elderly.

Volney, K. (n.d.). Follow the Fashion. Retrieved from jazzwritesandsingsforyou.com/Poetry-Krystal_Volney-fashion.html.

Volney, K. (2014, February 7). Global Communication and Mail. Retrieved from webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:eeKxTxfojW8J:www.city-connect.org/global-communication-and-mail/+&cd=266&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca.

Volney K. (2014, April 1). Global Communication and Mail. Retrieved from https://wsimag.com/science-and-technology/8334-global-communication-and-mail.

Volney, K. (2014, March). Golf. Retrieved from users.synapse.net/kgerken/Y-1403.pdf.

Volney, K. (2014, October 1). Golf. Retrieved from https://wsimag.com/sport/11150-golf.

Volney, K. (2019). Krystal Volney: Home. Retrieved from www.krystalvolney.com.

Volney, K. (n.d.). Krystal Volney’s blog. Retrieved from https://krystalvolney21.tumblr.com.

Volney, K. (2012, September 17). Krystal Volney photos. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/pictures/10.

Volney, K. (2012, June). Human Cloning. Retrieved from https://paulcooijmans.com/others/krystal_volney/human_cloning.html.

Volney, K. (2016, August 12). Interview with Dr. Vinton Cerf. Retrieved from webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:FK17Dh5j4AYJ:www.city-connect.org/interview-with-dr-vinton-cerf/+&cd=256&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca.

Volney, K. (2013, February). INTERVIEW WITH PAUL COOIJMANS, ADMINISTRATOR OF THE GIGA SOCIETY. Retrieved from https://paulcooijmans.com/interviews/volney.html.

Volney, K. (2013, August 30). Interview with Paul Cooijmans, Administrator of the Giga Society. Retrieved from webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:cr65IbgWRSAJ:www.city-connect.org/interview-with-paul-cooijmans-administrator-of-the-giga-society/+&cd=267&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca.

Volney, K. (2013). Krystal Volney (Author Summary). Retrieved from http://www.krystalvolney.blogspot.com.

Volney, K. (2019). Krystal Volney Books: @KrystalVolney. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/krystalvolney.

Volney, K. (2012, August 16). Krystal Volney pictures. Retrieved from krystalvolneyfanclubworldwide.blogspot.com/2012/08/krystal-volney-pictures_16.html.

Volney, K (2018, December 2). KV’S BIOGRAPHY AND OTHER INFORMATION: FOR FANS AND FRIENDS. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/88.

Volney, K. (2019). Message board. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/forum.

Volney, K. (2013, October 4). Oil and Gas Exploration into the Arctic. Retrieved from webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:7FdTjV7e4GMJ:www.city-connect.org/oil-and-gas-exploration-into-the-arctic/+&cd=265&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca.

Volney, K. (2018, December 21). Perception and Impressions in Society. Retrieved from webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:RqlxVuUQwLIJ:www.city-connect.org/perception-and-impressions-in-society/+&cd=6&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca.

Volney, K. (2012, June 20). Poem: Chronicles of Caniche. Retrieved from www.relatemag.com/2012/06/poem-chronicles-of-caniche/.

Volney, K. (n.d.). Poetry-Krystal Volney. Retrieved from jazzwritesandsingsforyou.com/Poetry-Krystal_Volney-nature_love_life.html.

Volney, K. (n.d.). Poetry by Krystal Volney. Retrieved from www.jazzwritesandsingsforyou.com/Poetry-Krystal_Volney-fashion.html.

Volney, K. (2015, February 24). Poets Corner: The Bubo Scandiacus. Retrieved from https://www.caribbeannewsnow.com/2015/02/24/poets-corner-the-bubo-scandiacus/.

Volney, K. (2013, October 26). Quantum Computing in 2013. Retrieved from webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:jO6BVfUQO9kJ:www.city-connect.org/quantum-computing-in-2013/+&cd=264&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca.

Volney, K. & Anja, J. (2019, March 11). Race. Retrieved from winone.iqsociety.org/issues/WIN_ONE_16.pdf.

Volney, K. (2018, March 27). Random photographs. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/pictures/1293.

Volney, K. (2019). Sign-up sheet. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/signup.

Volney, K. (2018, March 27). Some of the Caribbean Volneys. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/pictures/1281.

Volney, K. (2019). Store. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/store.

Volney, K. (2012, August 21). Technology, Time and Ageing. Retrieved from webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:SYlmQg8GvMgJ:www.city-connect.org/technology-time-and-aging/+&cd=3&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca.

Volney, K. (2015, October 5). The Big Bang Theory. Retrieved from webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:lg9mCDlhjNIJ:www.city-connect.org/the-big-bang-theory/+&cd=268&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca.

Volney, K. (2017, May 25). The Flower poem(2010): (Published in Vogue Italia). Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfansite.shutterfly.com/69.

Volney, K. (2010, March). The Flower Poem by Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://www.frostmagazine.com/2015/03/the-flower-poem-by-krystal-volney/.

Volney, K. (2018, August 24). The Mysterious Hermit. Retrieved from https://krystalvolneyfanssite.blogspot.com/2018/08/the-mysterious-hermit.html.

Volney, K. (2014, May 1). Thoughts in a minor. Retrieved from https://wsimag.com/feature/8828-thoughts-in-a-minor.

Volney, K. (2013, July 30). Wall Street Money: never sleeps. Retrieved from https://wsimag.com/feature/4556-wall-street.

Volney, K. (2013, December 11). WIN ONE issue XI: Quantum Computing. Retrieved from winone.iqsociety.org/issues/WIN_ONE_11.pdf.

Volney, K. (2014, July 7). WIN ONE issue XII: Global Communication and Mail. Retrieved from winone.iqsociety.org/issues/WIN_ONE_12.pdf.

Volney, K. (2017, May 13). WIN ONE issue XV: Interview with Dr. Vinton Cerf. Retrieved from winone.iqsociety.org/issues/WIN_ONE_15.pdf.

Wall Street International. (2019). Krystal Volney. Retrieved from https://wsimag.com/authors/83-krystal-volney.

Wikipedia. (2019). Aruba. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aruba.

Wikipedia. (2019). Author Solutions. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Author_Solutions.

Wikipedia. (2019). Child grooming. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_grooming.

Wikipedia. (2019). Child sexual abuse. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_sexual_abuse.

Wikipedia. (2019). Claude Monet. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Monet.

Wikipedia. (2019). Dominica. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominica.

Wikipedia. (2019). Edgar Degas. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.

Wikipedia. (2019). Edison Pioneers. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edison_Pioneers.

Wikipedia. (2019). Email. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Email.

Wikipedia. (2019). Frederic Thomas Nicholls. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederic_Thomas_Nicholls.

Wikipedia. (2019). Henri François Pittier. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_François_Pittier.

Wikipedia. (2019). International Society for Philosophical Enquiry. Retrieved from https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Society_for_Philosophical_Enquiry.

Wikipedia. (2019). Jean-Marc Nattier. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Marc_Nattier.

Wikipedia. (2019). John Wyndham. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wyndham.

Wikipedia. (2019). Leonardo da Vinci. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonardo_da_Vinci.

Wikipedia. (2019). Lewis Carroll. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Carroll.

Wikipedia. (2019). Martinique. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martinique.

Wikipedia. (2019). Mira Publishing. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mira_Books.

Wikipedia. (2019). Oba (ruler). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oba_(ruler).

Wikipedia. (2019). Phyllis Shand Allfrey. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllis_Shand_Allfrey.

Wikipedia. (2019). Saint Kitts. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Kitts.

Wikipedia. (2019). Silversmith. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silversmith.

Wikipedia. (2019). Sunsilk. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunsilk.

Wikipedia. (2019). The Gaylords (Dominican band). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gaylords_(Dominican_band).

Wikipedia. (2019). The Legend of Zelda. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda.

Wikipedia. (2019). Trafford Publishing. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trafford_Publishing.

Wikipedia. (2019). Turing Award. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turing_Award.

Wise Famous Quotes. (2019). Krystal Volney Quotes. Retrieved from https://www.wisefamousquotes.com/krystal-volney-quotes/.

Yggdrasil: A Journal of the Poetic Arts. (2014, March). March 2014 VOL XXII, Issue 3, Number 251. Retrieved from users.synapse.net/kgerken/Y-1403.pdf.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Author; Tech Writer & Part-Time Co-Editor, WIN ONE (WIN-ON-line Edition); Journal Editor, United Sigma Korea; Writer, Planet Ivy Magazine [Planet Ivy]; Writer, Desiblitz Magazine; Writer, Relate Magazine; Writer/Journalist, City Connect.

[2] Individual Publication Date: August 1, 2019: https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2019: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two) [Online].August 2019; 20(A). Available from: https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2019, August 8). An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two)Retrieved from https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A, August. 2019. <https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2019. “An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A. https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 20.A (August 2019). https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A. Available from: <https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2019, ‘An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 20.A., https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 20.A (2019):August. 2019. Web. <https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Krystal Volney on Early Personal Life, and Discovery of Giftedness and Talents (Part Two) [Internet]. (2019, August 20(A). Available from: https://in-sightjournal.com/2019/08/01/volney-two.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

%d bloggers like this: