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Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5)

September 1, 2020

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,643

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Anthony Sepulveda scored 174 (S.D.15) on Cosmic and is a member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: the art and state of IQ tests; some personal criteria; some concrete examples of intelligently run lives; some concrete examples of unintelligently run lives; some points of overlap between the intelligently and unintelligently run lives; what makes an IQ test valid and reliable, scientifically; fascination with alternative tests and the scores derived from them; concept “general intelligence”; mainstream intelligence tests; more comprehensive tests of general intelligence; the effects of average intelligence on someone’s personality; the effects of high intelligence on someone’s personality; some of the common factors found in most situations; the thought processing or reasoning through a novel situation with the common factors; what factors would a highly intelligent person see compared to a person of average intelligence; how could a highly intelligent person with megalomania or some other mental disorder make wrong decisions, waste their lives, and damage the lives of others; a psychological construct; to boost their ego; how joining the high-IQ communities help boost their professional status; have a “laughably” low number of testees; and “Cattell’s culturally fair test.”

Keywords: Anthony Sepulveda, IQ, IQ tests, World Genius Directory.

Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Shall we talk some more about the art and state of IQ tests? Now, I don’t know if IQ tests are as much of an art anymore. Perhaps, a qualitative analysis of intelligence as subjectively perceived can provide an indication as to more comprehensive observational metrics of intelligence in real-life or real-world functioning. That’s one such thing. It’s an act of artistic work in catalogue via cognition. Something like Timothy Leary’s, “The universe is an intelligence test.” Another is working on the outputs of person to paper, which is the formal IQ test considered concept “IQ test” in most people’s minds when reflecting on concept “IQ.” Can you remark on intelligence in real-world functioning, please?

Anthony Sepulveda (Brown)[1],[2]*From what I’ve seen, there’s very little difference between a person of average intelligence and one of high intelligence beyond the effects it can have on their personality.

Jacobsen: What are some personal criteria used in considering some actions intelligent and others not intelligent in real-world functioning to you?

Sepulveda (Brown): Broadly speaking, an act of intelligence would require you to understand the factors of an uncertain situation and use that knowledge to successfully navigate it to a desired conclusion. 

Jacobsen: What are some concrete examples of intelligently run lives?

Sepulveda (Brown):  The only examples that come to mind are learning from previous experience, analyzing new situations thoroughly, paying attention to important details and being more aware of the factors presently affecting you. Other examples (such as successfully achieving a goal) may seem fair enough to list, but there can be a plethora of influences (positive and negative) that could tip the scales either way and, thus, make them more a matter of luck than anything else.

Jacobsen: What are some concrete examples of unintelligently run lives?

Sepulveda (Brown): The inverse of the examples mentioned above.

Jacobsen: What, paradoxically, are some points of overlap between the intelligently and unintelligently run lives?

Sepulveda (Brown):  Even the more intelligent among us have to admit, acts of stupidity are way more fun!! Life would be unbearably boring if you only take the options that are reasonable and responsible. 

Jacobsen: What makes an IQ test valid and reliable, scientifically?

Sepulveda (Brown): A sufficient number of valid problems and testees from which to gather accurate statistical data. Sadly, most tests fall laughably short on both and draw outrageous conclusions from tiny sample groups (often 30 testees). Even many professionally proctored exams have issues that I argue renders them invalid.

Jacobsen: Why is there a fascination with alternative tests and the scores derived from them?

Sepulveda (Brown): It seems to me that most members of the High IQ Community joined because they wanted to boost their ego, meet others more like themselves or distinguish themselves for professional reasons. Everyone wants to feel special. By performing well on a difficult test or a variety of tests, you can legitimize that belief.

Jacobsen: What mainstream intelligence tests seem best in tapping into concept “general intelligence”?

Sepulveda (Brown): Cattell’s culturally fair test is the only one that comes to mind. But I’ve only taken a few proctored tests, so it’s possible that there are better options that I’m presently unaware of.

Jacobsen: If you could build on the decades of efforts of mainstream intelligence tests, what would be the efforts?

Sepulveda (Brown): As I mentioned earlier, I designed an IQ test of my own – X’s and O’s. The inspiration for this came after I began to examine other tests critically and found a number of issues that I believe rendered them invalid. After over a year of discussions, trial and error, I felt I had designed a sufficient number of valid problems and compiled them for use on the Opal Quest Group website. 

(Special thanks to James Dorsey for being so forthcoming during that process and helping me share my work with the world.)

Jacobsen: How would you implement more comprehensive tests of general intelligence?

Sepulveda (Brown): IQ tests were originally designed with the intent of dividing students into different classes based on their performance. That way everyone could be taught at their preferred pace. This has long since fallen out of practice (excluding extreme situations, of course) and there don’t seem to be any other practical applications beyond their use in statistical studies or as a means to distinguish yourself professionally.  

Jacobsen: What are some of the effects of average intelligence on someone’s personality?

Sepulveda (Brown): That is such a broad question I would have to answer it in the form of a book to do it complete justice. But the short answer is that being unable to solve problems or properly assess risks can result in poor social and economic standing, causing depression and other health risks. 

Jacobsen: What are some of the effects of high intelligence on someone’s personality?

Sepulveda (Brown): Interestingly, alongside narcissism, this condition is also very likely to cause depression. Especially if you’re born into a working or lower class family where you’re constantly aware of all the problems around you, but have little means with which to solve them.

Speaking for myself, I often feel a certain existential angst that springs from a genuine desire to better the world around me but knowing that even my best efforts will likely have little to no effect in altering our collective fate and result in a life wasted stressing over vain work, I can no longer justify pursuing that desire. Instead, I try to simply enjoy what little time I have and help where I can. Because I can justify that much, at least. But I still feel a sense of urgency to perform some good work and disappointment over all this arguably wasted time. 

Jacobsen: What are some of the common factors found in most situations?

Sepulveda (Brown): In very general terms, a situation can be described by the actions, interactions and reactions of the objects (nonliving material) and subjects (living material) in an area. By analyzing and understanding the functions of all the important objects and subjects in any given situation, you can use that knowledge to accomplish reasonable goals.

Jacobsen: With an example, what would be the thought processing or reasoning through a novel situation with the common factors for you?

Sepulveda (Brown): If your goal is to solve a math problem, you need to identify the symbols composing the equation, understand what each one means and how they relate to each other, then follow the order of operations necessary to bring you to a conclusion that resolves the problem.

Jacobsen: What factors would a highly intelligent person see compared to a person of average intelligence?

Sepulveda (Brown): Everyone sees the same thing (metaphorically speaking), some just understand what they see more accurately than others. If you understand something, you’re more likely to remember it longer and be able to use that information to resolve situations where it is applicable later. With this in mind, I’m not certain that there’s any significant difference in what healthy individuals with different IQs can do if they apply themselves towards the same goal.

Jacobsen: How could a highly intelligent person with megalomania or some other mental disorder make wrong decisions, waste their lives, and damage the lives of others? For example, Keith Raniere seems like one example; as has been said by others, cult leaders are narcissists who failed to garner fame and retreat to a zone of safety. An imaginary place of omnipotence, omniscience, or, simply, delusion and the power to exercise coercive narcissistic control.

Sepulveda (Brown): Any number of ways. The best example that comes to mind is Christopher Michael Langan, a well known member of the High IQ Community with a number of overzealous followers, who seems to spend a majority of his time pushing his own political, ‘scientific’ and theological beliefs on anyone willing to listen without challenging him. Luckily, he wasn’t born into a more prominent family and his influence is limited by his disagreeability. 

Jacobsen: What intelligence tests do seem reliable and valid in the measure of a psychological construct?

Sepulveda (Brown): I’m not familiar enough with the concept of psychological constructs to make any recommendations.

Jacobsen: Why do they want to boost their ego?

Sepulveda (Brown): The same reason anyone would, it feels good.

Jacobsen: How would joining the high-IQ communities help boost their professional status?

Sepulveda (Brown): Some professions value intelligence in their employees more than others and would feel more inclined to utilize someone with such credentials. 

Jacobsen: If most tests have a “laughably” low number of testees – “30,” and if many seek validation of this “belief,” what does this state about the high-IQ community, as such, and one sector of its general membership?

Sepulveda (Brown): Nothing good. The High IQ Community is in very poor condition at this point. Outside of Mensa, the Atlantiq Society and the personal efforts of Jeffery Ford, I’m not aware of any group putting forth any effort towards practical solutions towards real world problems. All the others seem to be more focused on the development of amateur tests with which to waste each other’s time.

Jacobsen: Why “Cattell’s culturally fair test”?

Sepulveda (Brown): Of the professionally proctored tests I’m aware of, Cattell’s is unique in that it has the lowest general knowledge requirement. This is important because knowledge is not attained in a universally linear fashion. Our understanding is limited to our experience and our ability to gain understanding from them. And as each individual undergoes a relatively unique combination of experiences, we should not prematurely judge someone who does possess certain knowledge as lesser than others. Ideally, any test used to rank individual ability would have no knowledge requirement of any kind using spatial and/or certain logic problems. 

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: September 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5) [Online].September 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, September 1). Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, September. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (September 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020):September. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on the Art and State of IQ Tests: Member, World Genius Directory (5) [Internet]. (2020, September 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-5.

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In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

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