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The Ex-Muslim Blasphemer in France: Waleed Al-Husseini

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 1.A, Idea: The Tale of the Tribe: International Apostates

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: Apostasia

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 4, 2020

Issue Publication Date: TBD

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Once Per Year

Words: 955

Keywords: elsewhere, ex-Muslims, France, principles of opposition, secularism, speech, Waleed Al-Husseini.

The Ex-Muslim Blasphemer in France: Waleed Al-Husseini[1],[2]

Waleed Al-Husseini founded the Council of Ex-Muslims of France. He escaped the Palestinian Authority after torture and imprisonment in Palestine to Jordan and then France. He is a friend. 

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: As a friend and colleague, we published several interviews together on a variety of topics centered on religion and the ex-Muslim community, especially the ex-Muslim community in France and the organization founded by you: Council of Ex-Muslims of France. 

Waleed Al-Husseini: Yes, and thank you for this and interviewing numerous ex-Muslims, because it is for many still very taboo. For others, it is fear in the name of not offending some Muslims.

Jacobsen: What new developments occurred for the Council of Ex-Muslims of France for 2017?

Al-Husseini: The most important thing is that we become more recognized in France and more in the media, especially talking about us and our activities. Many have joined our cause once they discover that they are not alone and have the same ideas as us. We support each other.

We improve the discussion in France about most of the Islamic issues including the hijab and what they like to call Islamophobia. So, more and more, we become a real part of this discussion about Islamic values and what Islamists are trying to pass into the secular and liberal parts of society.

I know the debates in France. It is increasing in Canada and the USA.

Jacobsen: For the Council of Ex-Muslims of France, how often do death threats come to the inboxes, or via other means, of members including yourself?

Al-Husseini: I received 5 death threats by internet today. This is a great day and nothing dangerous. It is been like that since the beginning. The easiest threats are by the internet. For me, it is not dangerous because the ones who really want to kill you will not tell you before.

The most serious things come from some Islamist organizations and sites, who post our photos to all their readers. This puts us in a very dangerous situation. For any random person, the organized Islamists ask and try to acquire our addresses.

This happened to me, personally, many times. That is why now my address is hidden and why I am taking greater care to take care of myself. For example, I simply do not travel to certain areas in Paris controlled by Muslims – Muslim areas.

This religion didn’t accept someone to go out. It didn’t accept the criticism. In 2017, only Islam and the mafia act this way.

Jacobsen: You were tortured, for several months, in a Palestinian prison by the Palestinian Authority for charges of blasphemy. I know the types and extent of the torture based on conversations with you. Do these memories resurface, at times, in personal life – of the torture?

Al-Husseini: I am always trying to forget it. It was a hard time. Most of the time for me was hard. It is the time recollected when I wrote my book Blasphemer: The Price I Paid for Rejecting Islam. I had to remember all this time with the most difficult detailing.

Now, not that much compared to some others because the victims of Islamic fundamentalism are so many; many paid their lives all over the world and have had the same as what happened to me or worse.

Jacobsen: What threats to secularism exist in France? How does the Council of Ex-Muslims of France represent a bulwark against those who wish to silence the non-religious, ex-religious, and the general formal irreligious?

Al-Husseini: Secularism in France threatens Islamists and is threatened by Islamism. The main problem for some Muslims is that they want the Islamism in place of secularism rather than secular Islam.

So, they do all that they can. They want society to accept the hijab in the name of liberty. They want limited freedom of speech and limited criticism of Islam, which comes in the form of false charges of Islamophobia and racism.

That is why, always, the Islamophobia charges, for me, are a modern fatwa: nothing else. A lot of examples are like halal food, etc. What we do to protect secularism is that we explain the ways of Islamism, show it clearly, and have a rich debate about it, we do our best to show their hypocrisy and their spokespeople for hypocrites.

We present the real hate of the Islamist imams and Islamism in general, and raising the standards of all these definitions in French society, keep the secular values out of the religious values and going forward with secularism, not back because only secularism will protect our society from civil war.

Jacobsen: Thank you for the opportunity and your time, Waleed.

Image Credit: Waleed Al-Husseini.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, In-Sight Publishing.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 4, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/the-ex-muslim-blasphemer-in-france-waleed-al-husseini.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, In-Sight Publishing, and Apostasia 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

The State of the State and Mosque with Waleed Al-Husseini

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 1.A, Idea: The Tale of the Tribe: International Apostates

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: Apostasia

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 4, 2020

Issue Publication Date: TBD

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Once Per Year

Words: 1,230

Keywords: apostasy, ex-Muslim, France, Waleed Al-Husseini.

Updates on Ex-Muslims in France and Elsewhere[1],[2]

Waleed Al-Husseini founded the Council of Ex-Muslims of France. He escaped the Palestinian Authority after torture and imprisonment in Palestine to Jordan and then France. He is a friend. 

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Let’s talk about principles in opposition to one another, for example, freedom of speech and secularism versus restricted speech and theocracy (or its various tendencies). How are France’s values and your own values more in line with freedom of speech and secularism? Why are these more important to be in place rather than restricted and theocratic values seen more in Islam?

Waleed Al-Husseini: For sure, my values are more in line with French values and secularism, and a perspective on humanity that sees everyone deserving of equal rights, and is firm on the need to get religion divorced from the state.

All of these things do not exist in Islam. These things only exist when all Muslims are seen as part of humanity as a whole. When Muslims are the majority in a country, it is different than when they are the minority.

Often, secularism and freedom of speech, and similar secular values, can only be computed only within the framework of Islam and Islamic values. That is why they are asking for the defense of the hijab in the name of liberty, but then they attack criticism of Islam in the name of racism.

Although, Islam is not a race, as I explained in one of our interviews! Even the hijab is an example of slavery and second-class citizenship in society, in my opinion, it means that women are a sexual tool. It becomes one of the most important signs of Islam in politics.

The criticism of Islam is a human right, according to human rights declarations. I gave you this example to show that is how they use things, to spare Islamic values from criticism!

Jacobsen: Sharia Law can imply Sharia courts, separate and distinct from the universal laws in a secular culture for everyone. So, in effect, a dual-law system can be set in a secular society. How do these Sharia courts arise in a secular context? What can dismantle them?

Why do these separate courts violate the principles of, for instance, one law for all?

Al-Husseini: This is what happened in the UK. That is why I do not like “secularism” and prefer the term “laïcité”! With secularism, they make insular communities and everyone lets them do what they want.

I remember in 2010, maybe, one court released someone who was charged with beating his wife, because he said that it is okay to beat your wife within Islam and our religion! That is why religions should be out of the state and the public arena.

The religions should be in their places of worship! No more than this, not in courts, education, or the political and even economic spheres like the factories and goods. Even the ones with the (halal) label. Yes, this label is more proof of communitarianism, to create a mini-society inside the mother society.

Jacobsen: What will make for a more just and secular society aligned with secular morality and international ideals expressed in the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, especially for minorities within minority groups such as ex-Muslims?

Al-Husseini: The way for secularism is very long, especially in the Arabic world. It is the need built from childhood. That is why we need to stop teaching religion in schools – especially assumed as true rather than as a set of beliefs of one group or another like a world religions class – and we need to teach children secular values.

Also, we should stop telling kids about jihad and should not separate people into Muslims and non-Muslims! It provides a simplistic view of the world. Let them see all of us as humans of many stripes and shades, and types. The governments should have secularism in law and work hard for it! Because our problem is not only with the government, but even with people. For example, when the Saudi girl made a video while she was wearing a miniskirt, many people were asking to arrest her and the government did. So, the problem is in the people! Sure, it is because this is coming from the brainwashing since they are kids. We have an example of looking at what happened recently after Saudi Arabia allowed women to drive the car. People were attacking the cars of women.

Jacobsen: One more principle is the truth, or attempts at its attainment, and obscurantism, or attempts to lie or half-lie and cover the truth in some way. One obscurantist terms, one is the word, which is vague: Islamophobia. 

How can truth overcome the obscurantism surrounding difficult topics in a discussion on Islam and the ex-Muslim community?

Al-Husseini: Islamophobia: this the Kalashnikov of what they call themselves ‘moderate’ (for me, moderate in Islam does not exist at all, we just have peaceful Muslims at the moment). Because, for example, there are the jihad-ists or terrorists who physically attack you, but then there are these moderates who also attack you in courts! And try to kill you when they make Islamophobia and racism look like the same and mixing all the definitions up. It is kind of a war of terms.

I talk about it in the last book I published in French! About the truth, we ex-Muslims know more about Islam and the way of Islamism. Let us talk, and hear us out! Do not attack or fight us, and then allow for our Muslim brothers who destroy their own countries to speak. So, what do you think they will do with other countries like Europe and the USA? They can open more for us to be in the media to speak and not to attack us with Islamophobia and other epithets and invectives.

They can protect those in Arabic and Islamic countries from being arrested based on using their freedom of speech. This liberty to choose. Also, inside France or these other countries for that matter, they can stop the call to kill us because this is hate speech, at a minimum: calling to have someone killed. I hope the media and people become more serious and more open-minded on this issue.

Jacobsen: Thank you for taking the time once more, Waleed. Always a pleasure, my friend.

Image Credit: Waleed Al-Husseini.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, In-Sight Publishing.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 4, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/the-state-of-the-state-and-mosque-with-waleed-al-husseini.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, In-Sight Publishing, and Apostasia 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Islamic Extremism and Lure of Paradise

Author: Dr. Leo Igwe

Numbering: Issue 1.B, Idea: African Freethinking

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: African Freethinker

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 4, 2020

Issue Publication Date: TBD

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,122

Keywords: believers, Islamic extremism, Leo Igwe, paradise, religions.

Islamic Extremism and Lure of Paradise[1],[2]

A paradise is one of the most powerful inventions of religions. It is a facility that religions have used to attract, hold, and control believers. A post mortem life in heaven is one of religion’s most cherished goods. It is one of the religion’s most sort-after commodities. Religions portray life in paradise as joyful, pleasurable, and blissful, as free from all suffering and pain, as bountiful and glorious, as a worthwhile pursuit. Religions present life in paradise as attractive and as the perfection of existence. As the primary abode of God/Allah, and the convention venue for all angels and saints and other benevolent celestial forces, a paradise is the localization of the hereafter, the afterlife, and the great beyond. The idea of a paradise is one of the pillars on which religions and supernatural faiths rest. All believers look forward to going to a paradise. Believers aspire to make heaven and be with God or Allah. Believers long to partake in this life of eternal bliss.

For believers, life in this world is a race to make heaven, a race from a wretched world towards a paradise in the next world. All believers want to participate in this ultimate race. No believer wants to be left out of this endeavour. No believer wants to miss the prize of eternal life with Allah.

Incidentally, paradise is not a matter of fact. Eternal life in yet-to-be-located heaven is an illusion. The idea of a paradise is a matter of belief, or better, a matter of faith. A paradise is religion’s answer, comforting answer, to death, human misery, and mortality. It removes the stoppage that death places on life in this world. The idea of a paradise in the hereafter substitutes this life’s finitude with another life’s infinitude. It provides a continuation and a consolation. The facility of a paradise soothes the pain and agony of this worldly life by literally saying: Life does not end here. Life continues in the hereafter. There is a better life somewhere, and it is a life of eternal happiness. Critically speaking, the idea of a paradise is absurd and counter-intuitive. There is no evidence that such a place exists anywhere. There is no justification that life continues after death as religions teach and preach. However, the proposition that a paradise exists in the hereafter maintains a stranglehold on the minds of believers across cultures and societies.

Given the notion that death ushers every faithful into that life of eternal bliss, the lure of a paradise is the propelling force for the existence and endurance of this life. Paradise makes believers not to see death as a frightful end to this life as we know it. Instead, for believers, death closes this world’s chapter of life and opens the next world/life’s chapter. Meanwhile, a paradise is not an automatic heritage for all humans who die, and for all believers who have embraced their mortality. To make it into a paradise, believers must qualify through their actions and deeds in this life and this world. It is at this point that the lure of a paradise intersects with good and evil deeds, compassionate and cruel acts, virtuous and criminal activities in this world. The quest to enter a paradise motivates believers to perform acts of love, selflessness, and kindness. For instance, many Muslims give alms to the poor; they feed the hungry, visit the sick in the hospital, and support elderly persons. They engage in these activities with the hope that Allah would reward them in the hereafter. Simply put, Muslims hope that these acts of kindness and love would lead to a seamless passage into a paradise.

However, the desire to inherit heaven motivates people to commit acts of evil and wickedness. The idea of an inheritable paradise makes believers accord little or no value to this life, to humanity and this world. It gets religious believers to engage in atrocities with impunity. The lure of a paradise turns believers into monsters, and vicious human beings.

The quest for a paradise is at the root of jihadist Islam and a vicious form of the Muslim faith that is terrorizing the world. It propels Muslims to carry out human sacrifice and bloodletting; suicide, genocide, fratricide, patricide, uxoricide, infanticide, and other acts of ‘man’s inhumanity to man’. Muslim zealots who are behind the arrest and detention of Mubarak Bala are aware that Bala’s post on Facebook was harmless. But they are blinded. Their minds have been polluted. These Muslims have mentally been held hostage. They are driven by the lure of a post-mortem eternal bliss and the quest to inherit 72 virgins in the hereafter.

Muslim zealots who are campaigning to kill Mubarak Bala know that murder is wrong and against the law. But the lure of a paradise has corrupted and poisoned their sense of morality, decency, and legality. Muslim clerics have indoctrinated and brainwashed young Muslims to strongly believe that a paradise is real and awaits them in the hereafter. So, they live their lives caring for nothing else and nobody else except what would make them inherit a paradise. As state actors, these brainwashed Muslims use state institutions including the police and judiciary to realize this ultimate objective. They condone injustices and perpetrate any other acts that they consider pleasing to Allah. They persecute non muslims and ex-muslims, turn a blind eye on bloodletting by muslims and enable other illegalities in the name of Islam in order to secure a place in Allah’s bosom. The path of Islamic extremism is paved with the rabid quest to inherit a paradise.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, Humanist Association of Nigeria; Founder & CEO, Advocacy for Alleged Witches; Convener, Decade of Activism against Witch Persecution in Africa: 2020-2030.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 4, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/islamic-extremism-and-lure-of-paradise.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and African Freethinker by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and African Freethinker 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and African Freethinker with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Waleed Al-Husseini on Fundamentalism and Reform in Islam

Author: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 1.A, Idea: The Tale of the Tribe: International Apostates

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: Apostasia

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 2, 2020

Issue Publication Date: TBD

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Once Per Year

Words: 670

Keywords: apostasy, ex-Muslim, France, Waleed Al-Husseini.

Updates on Ex-Muslims in France and Elsewhere[1],[2]

Waleed Al-Husseini founded the Council of Ex-Muslims of France. He escaped the Palestinian Authority after torture and imprisonment in Palestine to Jordan and then France. He is a friend. 

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What about the pressing concerns of the moment? Miniskirts can make headlines. What are the fundamental issues right now?

Waleed Al-Husseini: The fundamentalism is the headline for this moment. What I mean in terms of fundamentalism is not only the jihad-ists who are bad, but also the miniskirts making the headlines in the media and making everything amiss in one country, this then takes over social media.

This is a fundamental issue. Every time, you will find something: summer coming soon. So, there will be people discussing the issues around the Burkini. You will continue to see these headlines that make it seem like the Dark Ages.

Exactly, Muslims in their mini-society in Europe and the USA live in the Dark Ages. They live in Arabic and Islamic countries.

Jacobsen: What about Muslim leaders who want an internal-to-Islam reformation? Is this a possibility? How far will it go?

Al-Husseini: This is our problem. Even if some Muslims need it, the population will not accept it. Last year, Jordan wanted to change the school’s lesson plans, reform it, but what happens often was people not liking this because they want to learn Sharia!

That is why even at this time it is impossible for reform in Islam. Now, it is like reform in Nazism, in their time when they have the power. Islam has the power. The religion has the connections and the money. So, it is impossible. Maybe later they can! In this time, yes, it is impossible.

Because the 1st religion to have a revolution of light was Islam in the time of Muʿtazila. That time was one of the best things about everything! Because they were looking for Quran at most as a historical document and nothing more!

So, we have problems because they believe this Quran is for every time and everywhere! For me, anyone can believe that he is a terrorist.

Jacobsen: What part can the ex-Muslim community play in the reformation of the faith and providing a safe way out for those trapped by religion and culture?

Al-Husseini: We are the reason for making many Muslims use the term moderate because of us. Because they do not accept killing us, the non-believers or ex-Muslims! We know more from the inside.

Most of us know the Quran through its original language, in Arabic, which is the strongest translation of the Quran! We know the ways of them, and will never be in these traps. We showed and explained this. We can be part of a united Muslim front, who really want to help against the fundamentalists.

And try to help our pals to be in the modern life, not stay there in the 7th century while we are in 21st.

Jacobsen: Insightful and cutting once again, my friend.

Image Credit: Waleed Al-Husseini.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Founder, In-Sight Publishing.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 2, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/waleed-al-husseini-on-fundamentalism-and-reform-in-islam.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, In-Sight Publishing, and Apostasia 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and Apostasia with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,623

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Heinrich Siemens was born as a member of a Low German community in Latvia, or the former Soviet Union. His family spoke Plautdietsch and read the Luther Bible in High German. He has performed very well on HRIQ tests of Ronald K. Hoeflin, Paul Cooijmans, Jonathan Wai, Theodosis Prousalis, and others. Some results have been above 5 sigma or 5 standard deviations. He developed the Three Sonnets Test (www.tweeback.com/hriq/Three-Sonnets.pdf). A lot of his life resolves around Plautdietsch language. He is the president of the international association of speakers of the language. He founded a publishing house devoted to this language:www.tweeback.com. Siemens enjoys the philosophy of Wittgenstein in particular and the philosophy of language in general. He has a film interest directors including Bergman, Kubrick, Melville, Tarr, Tarkovsky, Tarr, von Trier. If in Plautdietsch, he enjoys films by Alexandra Kulak & Ruslan Fedotov, Carlos Reygadas, Nora Fingscheidt, and others. He discusses: Germany; Plautdietsch, German, and Russian; the origin of Plautdietsch; the Mennonite religion; family life; giftedness; Ronald K. Hoeflin, Paul Cooijmans, Jonathan Wai, Theodosis Prousalis, and some others; and Tweeback Verlag.

Keywords: Heinrich Siemens, Jonathan Wai, Luther Bible, Paul Cooijmans, Plautdietsch, Ronald K. Hoeflin, Theodosis Prousalis, Tweeback Verlag.

An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: In Latvia, what is the cultural and socioeconomic meaning of the “Low German community”?

Heinrich Siemens: In the second half of the 18th century, when the German-born Catherine II. was Tsarina, many people from (High and Low) German-speaking countries (Germany did not yet exist) emigrated to the Russian Empire. My parents grew up in Siberia, but in the 1960s when the opportunity arose, they moved to Latvia, now part of the EU, but then part of the Soviet Union.

In our community we spoke Plautdietsch, the variety of Low German that was common in the former Soviet Union. But the Luther Bible was read in High German, the school was in Latvian and the lingua franca of the Soviet Union was Russian. I grew up with these languages. When I was 11, we emigrated to Germany.

2. Jacobsen: Why did you emigrate to Germany?

Siemens: As a German minority and as part of a religious community, we suffered great restrictions in the Soviet Union. I could not have become an academic, for example, and there was even the danger of being locked up in prison.

In the 1970s the cold war thawed a little and the possibility of emigration arose in the context of the Helsinki Accords. Many families could be reunited who had been separated for decades by the iron curtain.

3. Jacobsen: Are you trilingual now with Plautdietsch, German, and Russian?

Siemens: Yes, I feel most comfortable in these languages. There are a few more languages (including English) in which I read books or have simple conversations, but when it comes to in-depth conversations I quickly reach my limits.

4. Jacobsen: What is the origin of Plautdietsch?

Siemens: In contrast to High German, Low German has preserved the old consonants /p, t, k/ and the old monophthongs /i:, u:/, so it has not gone through the High German consonant shift and diphthongization (Pepa, Tiet, Wota, koake, Hus vs. Pfeffer, Zeit, Wasser, kochen, Haus). Consonantism is thus similar in Low German, Dutch, and English, while the long vowels /i:, u:/ are preserved only in Low German, while English, High German, and Dutch have diphthongs.

Plautdietsch is the Low German variety that was spoken between the Vistula and Nogat rivers in Poland. At that time, the Baltic Prussians (now extinct), the Slavic Kashubs and German settlers lived in this area, they all formed a Sprachbund and thus Plautdietsch was also influenced by Baltic and Slavic.

Now there are only a few Plautdietsch speakers left in Siberia, most of them have emigrated to Germany (about 200,000). There have been overseas emigrations since the 19th century, so that now there are about 100,000 speakers in North America and about 250,000 speakers in Latin America. In Europe the number of speakers is decreasing, in Latin America it is growing thanks to large families.

For about 100 years there has been a Plautdietsch literature, there are grammars and dictionaries, so that today it is a fully developed written language.

5. Jacobsen: Does the Mennonite religion still influence you? If not, why not? If so, how?

Siemens: Because my name is Heinrich, I naturally expected this Gretchenfrage 😉 (cf. Faust I by Goethe).

Mennonites differ from the other Christian religions in that they only baptize adults. I consider this principle to be very important, because everyone should decide for himself whether he wants to belong and to which religion he wants to belong. Theologically, pacifism is crucial for Mennonites, and this was also the reason for the many migrations of Mennonites: Whenever the young men were to become soldiers, the Mennonites emigrated to another country where they didn’t have to do army service.

I still share these religious principles, but I personally decided against being baptized. I belong to the cultural community of Mennonites, but not to a congregation. After careful consideration I have come to the conclusion that I want to live my life without God, maybe because of Ockham’s razor. When I see what the Bible (or other holy scriptures) and faith are misused for, I don’t want to be a part of it.

6. Jacobsen: How was family life for you? Was this reflective of many families of the time in Latvia?

Siemens: A childhood in the late 1960s and 1970s was very different from now. We played outside a lot, had no electronic gadgets yet, we lived in a three-generation household. My parents worked, we children were with the grandmother. The other families lived similarly, not only in our Low German community, but also the Latvians in our small town.

7. Jacobsen: Was giftedness noticed early for you?

Siemens: Giftedness was never an issue. Although I have always found cognitive challenges easier than many of my fellow human beings, I did not take my first test until I was 45. Today I know the international high range IQ community, but I didn’t know about it before.

8. Jacobsen: What were some of the tests by Ronald K. Hoeflin, Paul Cooijmans, Jonathan Wai, Theodosis Prousalis, and some others taken by you? What has been the full range of scores on S.D. 15? What test was the highest score for you?

Siemens: My most successful test results include the Titan test by Ronald K. Hoeflin (raw score 45/48), the Test of the Beheaded Man (33/40), the Marathon Test (108/111), both by Paul Cooijmans, many different tests and some won contests by Theodosis Prousalis, SLSE 48 (30/48) by Jonathan Wai, etc. Usually the results were beyond 5 standard deviations. The highest score was the verbal section of the Marathon Test with IQ 180 S.D. 15.

In this context, let me draw your attention to the only test I have designed: Three Sonnets (tweeback.com/hriq/Three-Sonnets.pdf). It takes some time to get into it, but if you consider that the test was published on Towel day, you have a clue. I am waiting for your submission. Have fun and dopamine release.

9. Jacobsen: Why found the publishing house Tweeback Verlag?

Siemens: The Tweeback Verlag has literature on and about Plautdietsch as its main focus. I founded it because there was no publisher in this niche yet and there were some books that needed to be published.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] 45/48 on the Titan Test by Dr. Ronald K. Hoeflin.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Heinrich Siemens on Background and Scores (Part One) [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/siemens-one.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,477

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Claus Volko is an Austrian computer and medical scientist who has conducted research on the treatment of cancer and severe mental disorders by conversion of stress hormones into immunity hormones. This research gave birth to a new scientific paradigm which he called “symbiont conversion theory”: methods to convert cells exhibiting parasitic behaviour to cells that act as symbionts. In 2013 Volko, obtained an IQ score of 172 on the Equally Normed Numerical Derivation Test. He is also the founder and president of Prudentia High IQ Society, a society for people with an IQ of 140 or higher, preferably academics. He discusses: Symbiont Conversion Theory; the importance of independent theorizing; what can go wrong without critical scrutiny and peers connected to excessive defensiveness in critical scrutiny of a theory; the “destroy and kill” paradigm; inflammation seen with the Symbiont Conversion Theory; cancer and the “conversion” of systemically negative masses of cancer cells; a practical manifestation; an entirely new scientific paradigm or an adapted and transitional new scientific paradigm; the term symbionts over some other term, even a neologism; the upper limit possibilities in medical applications; inflammation; healthy ways to improve the immune system; Symbiont Conversion Theory; misinterpreted; tumour cells; the general success rate of the current chemotherapy and radiotherapy paradigm of medicine; some other relevant terminology for the re-education of the cells; and some similar ideas in other fields.

Keywords: Claus Volko, destroy and kill, independent theorizing, Symbiont Conversion Theory, tumour cells.

An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Now, last time we talked, with Rick Rosner, you had a theory: Symbiont Conversion Theory. What is Symbiont Conversion Theory?

Dr. Claus Volko: Symbiont Conversion Theory is a new scientific paradigm. The basic hypothesis is that you do not have to kill cells that display parasitic behaviour but that you can re-educate, or re-program, them to become symbionts. This applies both to cancer and infectious diseases. There have already been publications showing that such a re-programming of bacteria, for example, is possible. I wrote a review article of these publications and proposed the term Symbiont Conversion Theory.

2. Jacobsen: What is the importance of independent theorizing?

Volko: A hypothesis can be called a theory as soon as evidence showing that it is true has been provided. Scientists should come up with many hypotheses, it is the basis of their work.

3. Jacobsen: What can go wrong without critical scrutiny and peers connected to excessive defensiveness in critical scrutiny of a theory?

Volko: As said, a hypothesis is a theory as soon as evidence has been provided. It is possible to falsify a hypothesis by providing counter-examples. That can also be done as soon as the hypothesis has become a theory. In case of Symbiont Conversion Theory, however, this theory is based on an existential statement: It is possible to re-educate parasitic cells. As I told you when we discussed Popper, existential statements cannot be disproven.

4. Jacobsen: Why is the “destroy and kill” paradigm regarding cancer insufficient at the present moment?

Volko: Because of the side-effects chemotherapy and radiotherapy have. They also kill healthy tissue and because they are based on mechanisms that initiate mutations, they can cause cancer themselves.

5. Jacobsen: How is inflammation seen with the Symbiont Conversion Theory?

Volko: Inflammation is a reaction of the immune system that has advantages and disadvantages for the patient. In general, we would like to strengthen the immune system but not by means of inflammation, as it damages tissue.

6. Jacobsen: How would this theory apply to cancer and the “conversion” of systemically negative masses of cancer cells into systemically positive masses of cancer?

Volko: The idea is to reprogram tumour cells so that they do not consume more than other cells and work as functional tissue.

7. Jacobsen: What would be a practical manifestation of this?

Volko: Re-educating parasitic cells instead of killing them would be a revolutionary thing to do. With cancer, it would possibly lead to a cure more often than traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

8. Jacobsen: More precisely, is it an entirely new scientific paradigm or an adapted and transitional new scientific paradigm?

Volko: It is an entirely new scientific paradigm. There has been no paradigm stating that parasites could be educated.

9. Jacobsen: Why use the term symbionts over some other term, even a neologism?

Volko: I use the term symbionts because this is exactly what it is all about: converting parasites into symbionts. While parasites make use of the host organism and have a detrimental effect on it, symbionts live in the state of symbiosis with the host organism so that both sides profit from this symbiosis.

10. Jacobsen: What would be the upper limit possibilities in medical applications for this particular form of treatment involving Symbiont Conversion Theory?

Volko: Probably parasitic and bacterial infections as well as cancer could be treated.

11. Jacobsen: How does inflammation damage tissue?

Volko: At medical school we learn that the stages of inflammation are “rubor, calor, dolor, functio laesa” (these are Latin words). The last term, “functio laesa”, means that the functionality of the tissue gets lost.

12. Jacobsen: What, typically, are normal, healthy ways to improve the immune system?

Volko: Commonly it is recommended to do sports to boost the immune system, and to eat  vitamins.

13. Jacobsen: How could Symbiont Conversion Theory be misinterpreted?

Volko: Tumour cells form because of spontaneous mutations. The immune system usually detects these mutations and removes the spurious cells. If the immune system does not succeed in doing so, cancer may arise.

14. Jacobsen: Why do tumour cells form?

Volko: Tumour cells form because of spontaneous mutations. The immune system usually detects these mutations and removes the spurious cells. If the immune system does not succeed in doing so, cancer may arise.

15. Jacobsen: What is the general success rate of the current chemotherapy and radiotherapy paradigm of medicine? Has this been improving or stagnating in its success rate?

Volko: Read about this in medical textbooks. In general, the success rate has been slightly improving because of new treatments, but it is far from being optimal.

16. Jacobsen: What would be some other relevant terminology for the re-education of the cells?

Volko: Some speak of reprogramming.

17. Jacobsen: What are some similar ideas in other fields?

Volko: Harvard Medical School coined the term “Modify and Repair” for the treatment of cancer by converting tumour cells to functional tissue.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Claus Volko on Symbiont Conversion Theory and More (Part Four) [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/volko-four.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,949

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Anthony Sepulveda scored 174 (S.D.15) on Cosmic and is a member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: life; death; the meaning of life; boundary for the meaning of life; spiritual or natural entities; realization of the finitude of life; the idea of a soul; high intelligence; in the context of the contemplation of death; a cancer test; the priorities in life; a cancer diagnosis; feeling about it; the purpose of life; hopes moving forward; the type of cancer; a bucket list; legacy; the knowledge day-to-day; the baseline things that matter now; and religious beliefs and adherence to certainty in an afterlife.

Keywords: Anthony Sepulveda, cancer, death, life.

An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Hey Anthony! Let’s talk about life and death. First, some rapid-fire questions followed by some longer questions, we can then move into personal questions. What is life to you?

Anthony Sepulveda (Brown): Life is a pretty vague term. Ideally, it would be defined by its correlation with consciousness. But we can’t really be certain.

2. Jacobsen: What is death to you?

Sepulveda (Brown): Death occurs when the physiological processes of an organism fail and revert to purely physical ones.

3. Jacobsen: What is the meaning of life to you?

Sepulveda (Brown): It’s such a bizarre question. Meaning implies intent beyond simple existence and likely cannot be conclusively clarified beyond a subject’s nature. For example, if philosophers were to examine a carburetor with the intent of divining the meaning of its existence, two groups would likely form – one with the intent of determining its purpose by relating its design to known scientific facts, while the other squabbled over how it exists at all. It’s my belief that the purpose (not the meaning) of life in any form is to survive, procreate, explore, have fun and be happy, in that order. But those of the latter group would be unsatisfied with that answer because they never accept simple answers. In truth, what they really want is to fully understand the epistemic nature of God and the Grand Design. And it’s probably never occurred to them that our limited powers of cognition may be completely inept in the face of such a problem.

4. Jacobsen: Does the fact of, at least, physical death provide a context for finality of the body, at a minimum, and, therefore, a boundary for meaning of life to take place?

Sepulveda (Brown): No, meaning is assigned to whole groups more accurately than individuals

5. Jacobsen: Are human beings fundamentally spiritual or natural entities?

Sepulveda (Brown): All processes are natural.

6. Jacobsen: What do you think science and philosophy clearly show about human nature? Or, what is human nature?

Sepulveda (Brown): Deterministic.

7. Jacobsen: When it comes to one’s realization of the finitude of life for others and oneself, what does this do to the sense of one’s total amount of time in life?

Sepulveda (Brown): It accentuates the line between life and death and, in my case, at least, exaggerates one’s priorities.

8. Jacobsen: Does the idea of a soul make any sense to you?

Sepulveda (Brown): Not in the traditional sense that it is connected to yet, somehow, separate from our physical self.

9. Jacobsen: A good mind, a rational one, can help with the establishment of a longer, healthier life on average, but cannot stave of physical death. It’s a fact of life. Death is coming our way. What does high intelligence mean in the context of the contemplation of death?

Sepulveda (Brown): I’m not sure that intelligence has much impact on one’s perspective when it comes to mortality. I’ve met many people across a wide spectrum of intellectual and creative ability and haven’t yet found a correlation between individual ability and personal opinion. Some are religious, some aren’t. Many are certain of their opinions, others, including myself, admit to their ignorance on the subject. I believe the that any difference of opinion is due to the relatively unique combination of experiences we’ve cultivated throughout our lives and that, since death is the ultimate unknown factor, we can never truly be certain of any processes that occur to any non-physical part of ourselves after death.

10. Jacobsen: Now, if we move into more personal materials, your friend had a cancer test. What is the story leading up to it?

Sepulveda (Brown): Actually, it was me that underwent a cancer screening. (Pretext for those reading – In part one, I was asked about important life experiences. I neglected to mention my cancer testing because telling the story in it’s entirety could have potentially had a negative effect on someone I care about greatly, She and I discussed this after the publication of my first interview and she assured me that she would not be effected by it’s release). As for the story itself, I found a lump in a place that should never ever have one late one night (around 10 PM). After the initial shock, I didn’t know what to do. The only action I felt certain of was to contact my best friend, Tango. Not to tell her of my unfortunate discovery (I kept it to myself until after I’d received the negative test results), but simply to tell her how much she meant to me.

11. Jacobsen: How does this test change the priorities in life?

Sepulveda (Brown): Profoundly. Prior to it, I, likely, would have focused on the long term effects of my actions. Now, I’m much more concerned with my overall satisfaction before death.

12. Jacobsen: How does a cancer diagnosis reorient the timeline of a life?

Sepulveda (Brown): It exaggerates your priorities exponentially.

13. Jacobsen: How are you feeling about it?

Sepulveda (Brown): Now, I’m grateful for it. It forced me to face my own mortality and determine what is truly important. Ultimately, I believe that life overall will move inexorably towards it’s eventual conclusion. So it doesn’t matter what I do or accomplish. So I may as well focus on whatever goal I want, no matter the consequences.

14. Jacobsen: What is the purpose of a life in the context of a shortened life, knowing about it, and seeing that one’s life will be cut far more short than others?

Sepulveda (Brown): As I said, facing that distinction exaggerates your opinions. Whatever the test results, I was determined to live my fullest life.

15. Jacobsen: What are your hopes moving forward in the context of the earlier, potentially, loss of a loved, and cared for, one?

Sepulveda (Brown): Hope is a bad word for me and I try my best not to rely upon it. But my ultimate goal is to understand my position in the game of life and attain as much personal satisfaction as I can with what options are open to me.

16. Jacobsen: What is the type of cancer?

Sepulveda (Brown): Nonexistent. The tests confirmed that it was a cyst, thankfully.

17. Jacobsen: Do you have a bucket list?

Sepulveda (Brown): I do. Would you like to know what’s on it?

18. Jacobsen: Have you thought much more about legacy? If so, what kinds or levels of it?

Sepulveda (Brown): Not really. I’m over 30 years old and single at the time of this interview, so having kids of my own is becoming an increasingly unappealing option. Luckily, I’m quite content with my status as an uncle to an amazing little girl I love dearly and spend as much time as I can with.

19. Jacobsen: How do you cope with the knowledge day-to-day?

Sepulveda (Brown): By trying my damnedest to live without regret. After securing my priorities, I explore every avenue that interests me without stressing on long term effects.

20. Jacobsen: What are the baseline things that matter now – with the additional clarity?

Sepulveda (Brown): Family, friends and fun. Many members of the High IQ Community believe that our inherent abilities predispose us the responsibility to use it to benefit society. I disagree because I believe that human evolution will inevitably head towards the same destination no matter what I do. Someone will come up with the next big idea, others will support it and it’s effects will spread as far as they can. The data for said idea is simply waiting to be gathered in the interim. It’s just a matter of time before someone finds it.

21. Jacobsen: Do you think many religious beliefs and adherence to certainty in an afterlife is to assuage and comfort a fear of an apparent finality of physical death?

Sepulveda (Brown):  Yes. I believe that people find comfort in the idea that the essence of who they are is a unique, singular thing (soul, consciousness, life force, etc.) that will exist in some stable state forever. But the idea of an afterlife (especially an infinite one) doesn’t make sense when you think about it logically. No matter the size of a site (physical or metaphysical), it will have a finite boundary. This implies that Heaven, Hell or any other post-death place of existence either cannot hold the potentially endless number of souls sent there unless there is a place for them to go once that boundary is reached. With this in mind, the only option that makes sense to me is reincarnation. Beyond that, however, I’m not sure that anything can be determined without some very unusual and, undoubtedly, unethical scientific experiments.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Anthony Sepulveda on Life and Death (Part Two) [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-two.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 3,086

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Rick Rosner and I conduct a conversational series entitled Ask A Genius on a variety of subjects through In-Sight Publishing on the personal and professional website for Rick. This series with Erik and Christian build in this idea. Erik Haereid earned a score at 185, on the N-VRA80. He is an expert in Actuarial Sciences. Christian Sorensen earned a score at 185+, i.e., at least 186, on the WAIS. He is an expert in philosophy. Both scores on a standard deviation of 15. A sigma of ~5.67 for Erik – a general intelligence rarity of 1 in 136,975,305 – and a sigma of ~5.67+ for Christian – a general intelligence rarity of more than 1 in 136,975,305. Neither splitting hairs nor a competition here; we agreed to a discussion, hopefully, for the edification of the audience here. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population. This amounts to a joint interview or conversation with Christian Sorensen, Erik Haereid, and myself.

Keywords: Christian Sorensen, Erik Haereid, philosophy.

Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: I want to set a groundwork on paradoxes, the impossible, the possible, the actual and the potential, the contradictory and the non-contradictory, mysteries versus problems, the paraconsistent versus the consistent versus the inconsistent, the complete versus the incomplete, the reductionistic versus the emergentistic, the deterministic versus the indeterministic, the statistical versus the non-probabilistic, ideal versus image, so on. Maybe, we can proceed in this ordering. Unless, either has a preference in a direction based on the suggestions here. Some more straightforward questions here: What defines a paradox?

Christian Sorensen: It could be said, that a paradox is equivalent to saying, that it is to enter with the one that is of them, for going out with the one that is of us. It is an expression that strictly speaking, is contrary to logic, but nevertheless its deep meaning and the effect it causes are logical.

Erik Haereid: It’s a part of our perception that cannot be explained. It’s a logically self-contradiction. It hides information we need to understand. It’s a mental spark; an invitation to critical thinking and mental evolvement.

Jacobsen: What defines the impossible?

Sorensen: The possibility that what could make a certain thing be what it would be, actually is something that doesn’t exists.

Haereid: The impossible is what is absolutely impossible. It’s the ultimate impossibility, beyond paradoxes, difficulties, what we don’t understand and beyond any obstacle that seems impossible to overcome; it’s not what we think and feel is impossible, but what really is impossible. Practically, the impossible, for humans, is where we think it is so; when we can’t see any way out or solution to it. When we give up.

It’s a theoretical quantity; we don’t know if anything is impossible. You can say that it’s impossible that I am in both Canada and Norway at the same moment, just now, physically. But we don’t know that for sure. We feel sure, we experience it as certain, but that’s perceptions and how we see things.

Jacobsen: What defines the possible?

Sorensen: The presence of both necessary and sufficient reasons, and the presence of sufficient reason alone.

Haereid: We can’t know if not everything is possible. Everything could theoretically be possible. We are sure that not everything is possible, but that’s not a proof.

It’s pragmatic claiming something to be impossible and possible. Then the impossible is defined as what we think and experience as impossible, and the possible what we experience as possible. Possibility has therefore to do with what we can experience, imagine and predict at a given moment. I think the Sumerians six thousand years ago thought it was impossible that human could travel into Space, to other celestial bodies. But we are sure about that they couldn’t travel into Space at that time. Strictly that is also a perception, our human experience. So, defining the possible and impossible practically, we have to limit it to what we humans experience and percept. 

Jacobsen: What defines the actual and the potential?

Sorensen: The presence or not of existence.

Haereid: The actual is what we percept as real, our experiences, either via our senses as sensed or thoughts as thought. Reality is perceived phenomena. A thought about a house and garden is real as a subjective thought, an image. If you see a house and a garden, you percept it as an experience; sense perceptions are real for you. If you hallucinate, you don’t know until another person put you into doubt by telling you that your view or perception is wrong; there are no house nor garden there in front of you. If many people agree disagreeing in your perception, then you agree that you hallucinate. But no one can say if you or the others are hallucinating. It’s impossible to tell. Therefore, objectivity is an agreement, compromises, manipulation, brainwashing, a unifying of several subjective experiences of actuality. You can’t even say that we can trust that our logical system is right or represents the truth, reality. We rely on that, but we have to doubt what we trust in; not to confuse us but to develop towards what is an increasing and better truth, as on a Hegelian dialectic path.

The potential is what can happen, more or less probable and possible. Every event in the Universe has been a potential, a former state in an ongoing development. Everything that humans think can happen, is a potential.

Jacobsen: What defines the contradictory and the non-contradictory?

Sorensen: The copulative and disjunctive union between being and not being.

Haereid: The contradictory is everything else from whatever; opposites. If X, then “Everything else than X” is the contradictory. The thesis’ antithesis. A conflict. Friction. Change. Development. Evolution. As long as there are contradictions, there are something perceivable. When there are no more contradictions, we have reached the end of everything.

One could say that black is the contradiction to white, but also that red, blue, yellow etc. is contradictions to white, because all those colors are in the contradiction set “not-white”.

In logic: If the proposition “The Earth is flat” is false, then the proposition is a contradiction. The knowledge that the Earth is spherical, is based on that contradiction; conflict, evolution, development, change.

Jacobsen: What defines mysteries versus problems?

Sorensen: The fact that problems, certainly admit the possibility of an answer, while mysteries do not.

Haereid: Mysteries make us curious, while problems make us anxious. Mysteries are unknown situations not necessary to solve. Problems are serious, crucial; necessary to solve to fulfill our needs.

Problems are unwanted or at least problematic, mysteries are welcome. We create mysteries as exercise for solving problems.

Jacobsen: What defines the paraconsistent versus the consistent versus the inconsistent?

Sorensen: Respectively the tolerance to inconsistency, the property through which it is not possible to deduce a contradiction, and the fallacy by means of which an argument seems valid when it is not.

Haereid: Exoteric spoken: The consistent can exist as true at the same time and place. It’s different entities X and Y that both are true; not contradictory. In harmony. Logical. The inconsistent lack consistency; it’s either contradictory or it’s some irrational or wrong issues in it. The paraconsistent has to do with tolerance and acceptance for inconsistency.

Jacobsen: What defines the complete versus the incomplete?

Sorensen: The one and the absence or presence of the lack.

Haereid: The complete is the theoretical end, perfection, absolute knowledge, where all questions are answered and every little hidden unrevealed truth is revealed; when it’s nothing left to answer. The End. It’s the end of every task. It’s also finishing a work, a meal, or any other closure.

The incomplete is where we always have been and always will be; in the realm of wondering, frustration, curiosity, estimations…it’s the daily stress. It’s as mental as completeness. It’s a feeling, an experience of never doing enough, never entering the finish line. It’s being at work, planning, running, living without resting.

Jacobsen: What defines the reductionistic versus the emergentistic?

Sorensen: Metaphor and synergy.

Haereid: By the reductionistic we mean that every entity can be explained by its components. Even though water is something else than hydrogen and oxygen, it can be explained by those two components. A reductionistic question is if thoughts could be explained by physical components in the brain.

By the emergentistic we mean that even though the entity is composed by something, it transforms into something else than the sum of its components. It evolves beyond the product or sum of each part it consists of.

Jacobsen: What defines the deterministic versus the indeterministic?

Sorensen: Destiny and chance.

Haereid: Does the Universe evolve after some stringent rule, or by chance? We talk about deterministic if we don’t have any power to influence ourselves or the environment; we don’t have a free will, no responsibility; whatever we do or happens around us is predetermined, following some rules. Everything has a cause.

Something is indeterministic if it’s unpredictable; we can change the environment, our actions have meanings and we are responsible. If our actions don’t have a cause, we are both free and responsible. If everything has a cause, we are confined in a life where freedom is an illusion; even though we feel that what we do are results from a free will, it’s not.

Jacobsen: What defines the statistical versus the non-probabilistic?

Sorensen: The fact whether the difference is due to chance or not.

Haereid: It’s about degrees of probability for events to happen. If something is unlikely or mathematical impossible to happen, the probability is zero and we have a non-probabilistic situation. If there is some probability for anything to occur, we can measure it mathematically in one way or the other. Then we could call it statistical. I guess this is it.

Jacobsen: What defines ideal versus image?

Sorensen: Immateriality through timelessness, and materiality by means of temporality.

Haereid: Image is a representation of something, an attempt to copy or describe something else, that is not present. A picture. A projection. What is present could be sense perceptions; sensations. An image could also be a projection, e.g. a text or a painting, of e.g. a mental image.  

Ideal is a perfect goal. Something we aim for. A benchmark. It differs from image in that it’s not real in any way, just a plan or a wish, while image is real in the sense of a representation, a mask or picture or text or painting.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Christian is a Philosopher that comes from Belgium. What identifies him the most and above all is simplicity, for everything is better with “vanilla flavour.” Perhaps, for this reason, his intellectual passion is criticism and irony, in the sense of trying to reveal what “hides behind the mask,” and give birth to the true. For him, ignorance and knowledge never “cross paths.” What he likes the most in his leisure time, is to go for a walk with his wife.

Erik Haereid has been a member of Mensa since 2013, and is among the top scorers on several of the most credible IQ-tests in the unstandardized HRT-environment. He is listed in the World Genius Directory. He is also a member of several other high IQ Societies.

Erik, born in 1963, grew up in OsloNorway, in a middle class home at Grefsen nearby the forest, and started early running and cross country skiing. After finishing schools he studied mathematics, statistics and actuarial science at the University of Oslo. One of his first glimpses of math-skills appeared after he got a perfect score as the only student on a five hour math exam in high school.

He did his military duty in His Majesty The King’s Guard (Drilltroppen)).

Impatient as he is, he couldn’t sit still and only studying, so among many things he worked as a freelance journalist in a small news agency.  In that period, he did some environmental volunteerism with Norges Naturvernforbund (Norwegian Society for the Conservation of Nature), where he was an activist, freelance journalist and arranged ‘Sykkeldagen i Oslo’ twice (1989 and 1990) as well as environmental issues lectures. He also wrote some crime short stories in A-Magasinet (Aftenposten (one of the main newspapers in Norway), the same paper where he earned his runner up (second place) in a nationwide writing contest in 1985. He also wrote several articles in different newspapers, magazines and so on in the 1980s and early 1990s.

He earned an M.Sc. degree in Statistics and Actuarial Sciences in 1991, and worked as an actuary novice/actuary from 1987 to 1995 in several Norwegian Insurance companies. He was the Academic Director (1998-2000) of insurance at the BI Norwegian Business School (1998-2000), Manager (1997-1998) of business insurance, life insurance, and pensions and formerly Actuary (1996-1997) at Nordea in Oslo Area, Norway, a self-employed Actuary Consultant (1996-1997), an Insurance Broker (1995-1996) at Assurance Centeret, Actuary (1991-1995) at Alfa Livsforsikring, novice Actuary (1987-1990) at UNI Forsikring.

In 1989 he worked in a project in Dallas with a Texas computer company for a month incorporating a Norwegian pension product into a data system. Erik is specialized in life insurance and pensions, both private and business insurances. From 1991 to 1995 he was a main part of developing new life insurance saving products adapted to bank business (Sparebanken NOR), and he developed the mathematics behind the premiums and premium reserves.

He has industry experience in accounting, insurance, and insurance as a broker. He writes in his IQ-blog the online newspaper Nettavisen. He has personal interests among other things in history, philosophy and social psychology.

In 1995, he moved to Aalborg in Denmark because of a Danish girl he met. He worked as an insurance broker for one year, and took advantage of this experience later when he developed his own consultant company.

In Aalborg, he taught himself some programming (Visual Basic), and developed an insurance calculation software program which he sold to a Norwegian Insurance Company. After moving to Oslo with his girlfriend, he was hired as consultant by the same company to a project that lasted one year.

After this, he became the Manager of business insurance in the insurance company Norske Liv. At that time he had developed and nurtured his idea of establishing an actuarial consulting company, and he did this after some years on a full-time basis with his actuarial colleague. In the beginning, the company was small. He had to gain money, and worked for almost two years as an Academic Director of insurance at the BI Norwegian Business School.

Then the consultant company started to grow, and he quitted BI and used his full time in NIA (Nordic Insurance Administration). This was in 1998/99, and he has been there since.

NIA provides actuarial consulting services within the pension and life insurance area, especially towards the business market. They was one of the leading actuarial consulting companies in Norway through many years when Defined Benefit Pension Plans were on its peak and companies needed evaluations and calculations concerning their pension schemes and accountings. With the less complex, and cheaper, Defined Contribution Pension Plans entering Norway the last 10-15 years, the need of actuaries is less concerning business pension schemes.

Erik’s book from 2011, Benektelse og Verdighet, contains some thoughts about our superficial, often discriminating societies, where the virtue seems to be egocentrism without thoughts about the whole. Empathy is lacking, and existential division into “us” and “them” is a mental challenge with major consequences. One of the obstacles is when people with power – mind, scientific, money, political, popularity – defend this kind of mind as “necessary” and “survival of the fittest” without understanding that such thoughts make the democracies much more volatile and threatened. When people do not understand the genesis of extreme violence like school killings, suicide or sociopathy, asking “how can this happen?” repeatedly, one can wonder how smart man really is. The responsibility is not limited to let’s say the parents. The responsibility is everyone’s. The day we can survive, mentally, being honest about our lives and existence, we will take huge leaps into the future of mankind.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Ask Two Geniuses: Conversation with Christian Sorensen and Erik Haereid on Foundations of Philosophical Concepts (Part One) [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/haereid-sorensen-one.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,667

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Dr. Giuseppe Corrente is a Computer Science teacher at Torino University. He earned a Ph.D. in Science and High Technology – Computer Science in 2013 at Torino University. He has contributed to the World Intelligence Network’s publication Phenomenon. He discusses: sentimentalism; becoming a more complete and integrated individual; mobbing; most sentimental things; Positive Disintegration Theory; how the mobbing took place; the most painful experience a human being can encounter; the psychology behind mob violence; and the main lesson in the importance of endurance in the Positive Disintegration theory of giftedness

Keywords: endurance, gifted, Giuseppe Corrente, Italy, H.L. Mencken, mobbing, Positive Disintegration Theory, sentimentalism.

An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Sentimentalism, to take a cue from the great American satirist and journalist, and skeptic, H.L. Mencken, is the main fault of main alongside vanity as these become the central bane of women externally while distinct realism – as the supreme realists of the race – become the self-limits or faults of women internally. You noted a personal sentimental life to me. This seems quintessentially manly and common to most or all men, as vanity is common to all men. A congenital hangover of the assumed power and prestige in societies. Why self-describe as sentimental as a starter?

Giuseppe Corrente: I am not known to be sentimental for most parts of my life, when the rationalism was predominant in me. But during the decades these two parts of me equilibrated themselves, and now I am more conscious of my emotions than before.

2. Jacobsen: How has the sentimentalism been an important part of becoming a more complete and integrated individual throughout personal evolution in life for you?

Corrente:  My tormented youthfulness was negative for some aspects, but also a good thing for knowledge of the true values. And when I knew better myself, I was surprised to be sentimental other than a rationalist. Surely an important impact in my life was the women, was there that sentimentalism in me had a strong impulse and I saw the world with different eyes. And this surprised me, as a mysterious other me that I discovered for the first time.

3. Jacobsen: You were mobbed. How were these difficulties important in the development of a firmer sense of self?

Corrente: Which does not kill you, enforces you. It is a common opinion. With time, patience and willingness, it becomes also true.

4. Jacobsen: What makes you most sentimental?

Corrente: Animals and wildlife. I think that who doesn’t respect animals and nature cannot be a good man. I am a member and a fan of Greenpeace. This type of sentimentalism has been with me since birth. As already said, the other great passion for me, since my twenties, has been the women. There was almost three periods of my life that they dominated fully my thoughts, during my twenties, middle thirties and forty years old.

5. Jacobsen: How does the aforementioned Positive Disintegration theory present an insight into personal evolution through more deep visions of self and the world with mobbing, etc.?

Corrente: Second, the Positive Disintegration theory, the conflicts and the feeling of the injustices of the common world can stimulate more deep visions of ourselves and of the world. To be attacked can transform one’s motivations based only or mainly on biological needs to some based on self-determined values essentially chosen by ourselves for the common good rather than an egoistic point of view.

6. Jacobsen: How were you mobbed?

Corrente: When I was a child my father knew that I was not really his natural son. He, from an external point of view, was exigent but correct, instead, my life was frequently hit by his psychic violence; we were obliged to obey him in all our choices, otherwise, he placed me in very intricate and offensive misunderstandings, often only to punish me. When other people saw that they thought he was in reason, or because he presented the things in a different way or simply because in the mindset of time if a father punishes a child there is ever a valid reason. His real motivation was that I was not his son and that he didn’t accept my intelligence and also my mother’s secret past. This was the beginning of a lot of misunderstanding and I was mobbed in a different and stronger way also in some job places, using the familiar conflict as a starting point, but after being attacked for questions very different from the basic facts. BACK TO FACTS: these are the words that I would like to have declared. And effectively I did, but uselessly. The mobbing is a plague that grows with layers, calumny is its strongest arm, and it can be crushing in a man’s life.

7. Jacobsen: What do you consider the most painful experience a human being can encounter?

Corrente: To not be recognized as a human being. Slaves feel this. All conditions that carry you near to be totally without a real freedom are devastating. Racism is so. Homophobia is so. Bullying is so. Mobbing is so. Mafia and camorra power are so for their victims. All these forms of violence can potentially kill yourself and all that is gown around you. They can transform in a second your life, all your life, not only you, in zero.

8. Jacobsen: How does this most painful experience for a human being compare to the experience of mobbing to you? What is the psychology behind mob violence against an individual? What is the internal, individual psychology of individuals who have gone through the mobbing by others within a community?

Corrente: When the mobbing reaches its peak, the personal feeling is not limited, you have the feeling to be a slave, that your life is in other’s hands, so in that moment, in those instants, your story and the most painful are in your mind the same thing. Between me and Jesus in that moment there is no distance, I am sacrificed with no justice: each time a single man is mobbed, for a second, God is dead in his own mind. He thinks that God is dead for all humanity. Everyone is his enemy, he is without defensive arms. Above all if he has no fault, it is the standard case in the mobbing, if he cannot in successive weeks and months contrast that situation, in himself by abstract and against his enemy with letters and advocates, and with doctors for his health, that experience will become a way towards a violent reaction, against himself or the others, a way towards the death. So I think: when there is a mobbing MUST be a reaction and better a reaction with advocates and doctors than by other means. Instead from the mobber’s point of view more the victim is clever and strong in his own results, more he has the right, in his distorted opinion, to do violence against the victim, psychologically and physically. So the paradox of mobbing is that it hits very often gifted and talented people.

9. Jacobsen: What is the main lesson in the importance of endurance in the Positive Disintegration theory of giftedness?

Corrente: In the Positive Disintegration theory of giftedness there are various levels that one has to overcome and each level has its barriers. So endurance is of fundamental importance. To clarify here I prefer to cite Edison: “Genius is 1% inspiration, 99% perspiration”. So endurance is the ingredient that permits you to earn something on all steps done along your own path.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Ph.D. (2013), Science and High Technology – Computer Science, Torino University.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Giuseppe Corrente on Sentimentalism, Mobbing, and Endurance (Part Six) [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/corrente-six.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 23.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Nineteen)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 8,307

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Marios Sophia Prodromou is a member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: the “Rat King”; other names; Caelestis; Spade; Draco; preferred name; meanings; the meaning of “Rat” and “King” in “Rat King”; feel hated by “most people”; other animal examples than a rat; the queens; a queen; the best minds; one name; degree and manner of different; the more explicit reference to lightness and darkness; the meaning of light; the origin and meaning of the name Marios Sophia Prodromou; John the Baptist; the Virgin Mary; the forms of parenting; family history and development as a Cypriot; the values of Scottish society; the values of Cypriot society; modern Scottish and Cypriot society; being a Cypriot; Turkey; Turkish mistakes; innocents; Erdogan’s attempt at recreation or reconsolidation of the (Neo-)Ottoman Empire through a Turkish expansionism; Greece; Greek mistakes; the Greeks obsessed with money; My Big Fat Greek Wedding; 6-sigma, or even 5-sigma, people within the high-IQ community; being introverted; no desire to interact with other high-range people, “really”; the discovery of giftedness; some other tests; the societal view of giftedness in Cyprus; other media opportunities; programs on television; “Prince Show”; the purpose; “With Love Christina”; nervous in both appearances; desire or want to be a somebody rather than a “nobody”; knowledge and Sophia; Greeks with an obsession on money; Sophia and knowledge; a real genius; a faux genius; more real geniuses or faux geniuses; people who fake striving to be a nobody while being a somebody as their main goal; some work pursuits; mental coaching; pressure for pupils; how much faster for most of the pupils; some of the basic strategies; some of the intermediate strategies; common, uncommon, and rare personality styles of the children; intellectual issues; public and private intellectuals; some educational attainments; social philosophy; political philosophy; economic philosophy; favourite philosopher; religious/non-religious philosophy; being balanced; kind of God; the argument for this God; the evidence for this God; most people’s hearts; fairness; justice; a single term, even a neologism, covering the idea of fairness and justice in unison; a supernatural order, a natural order, or both; definition of paranormal, supernatural, metaphysical, and natural, material, and physical in this context; the precise meaning of the idea of a paranormal “experience”; a paranormal experience; ethical philosophy; worldview; the British background influence the personal perception of the Cypriot society; inspiring kids; “tough”; alone; a member of “World Genius Directory, Prometheus, Mensa International, Epimetheus, GENIUS Umbrella Organization, sPIqr, Vertex, Grand IQ Society, Tetra, GOTHIQ, LEVIATHAN 160, Triple Nine Society, HELLIQ, The Glia Society, UBERIQ, TENIQ and many others”; societies; most reliable in providing a social and intellectual space over a long period of time for members; one spent the most time interacting with if at all; becoming a person of a value versus becoming a person of success; value less fungible than money in some fundamental sense; Madonna right, after all, but for everyone rather than just “girls”; success; value; common notions of success amongst the Greeks other than making lots and lots of money; kind of values must one have to make the “value” of “making an impact on your community”; esotericism and symbology; the Dudeist philosophy; Dudeism; open-minded; to be “everywhere”; the public alternative religious and philosophical groups; some characteristics of the secret groups without precise details of them; work or worked as a postal officer; working on some intellectual problem; the parts that are non-secretive and esoteric; kind of self-improvement; a small capacity of the brain; more men in the high-IQ societies than the women; the smartest person in history; Tesla; some of the smartest people alive now; Musk; Gates; Trump; religion and theology; faith; “ancient and secret esoteric knowledge”; kinds of symbols; the main symbols; the truth; thoughts on atheism; thoughts on theism; thoughts on agnosticism; mainly learned from purported secret esoteric knowledge; some hints or indications as to the purpose of life; changes in life; why pursue this course in life; how we know it’s ancient knowledge; those who simply cannot ‘take your word for it’; the unseen and rather a hallucination; unsatisfying and akin to a non-answer; Greek Orthodox Church; more wrong or more rights as a theology; forced and inertia-based belief in Greek Orthodox Christianity; their image of the nature of world, human beings, and the relations of human beings to one another and the world; creativity; intelligence; intuition; intuition truly a form of intelligence or more a subjectively formalized, experientially developed sensibility about life and its meanderings; genius; purpose of having ancient esoteric secret knowledge in the first place; idea as to authorship of the inscription; Mount Athos; “ancient knowledge”; the freemasons; the organization make most of them pawns; The Church of Satan, First Satanic Church, The Satanic Temple, Luciferianism, Order of Nine Angles, or the Temple of Set; The Church of Satan; First Satanic Church; The Satanic Temple; Luciferianism; Order of Nine Angles; the Temple of Set; literal or metaphorical (or both) angels and demons; Anton LaVey; his work been modified for better or for worse; Aleister Crowley or his self-claimed follower Timothy Leary; Anton LaVey; the nature of good and evil; thoughts on those who claim this is moral relativism; science and philosophy; ‘fact’; “idea”; poor decisions; differentiate intuition from other internal ‘talks’; the Gospel of John alongside of the Synoptic Gospels; a holy text; a particular religious text coming from the ancient world; Margaret Atwood; intuition; coming to terms with the world; words of advice or guidance to younger members of the profoundly gifted cohort who could use some guidance; For those parents with a profoundly gifted child; difficulties for some members of the profoundly gifted community; 1-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 2-sigma intelligence; -sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 3-sigma intelligence; 3-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 4-sigma intelligence; -sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 5-sigma intelligence; 5-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 6-sigma intelligence; societies emphasizing excellence more than equity; some of the oldest secret societies; the secret societies and the alternative theistic groups like the freemasons; things of annoyance; more at ease, at peace, with the world; ever plan to move away from Greece-Cyprus-Turkey area back to the United Kingdom or some other place; lifework; the general life trajectory; to end up; metaphysics; metaphysics from Dudeism; the most creative person in history; the best writer in history; the typical societal expectations of Greek heritage women; the typical societal expectations of Greek heritage men; and some cultural nuances largely known only to the Greeks about the ways in which men and women, old and young, blue-collar and white-collar, and so on, exist in Greek society, in Cypriot society, and in the diaspora with Greek heritage.

Keywords: Caelestis, Cyprus, dark, Draco, genius, Greek, heritage, light, Marios Sophia Prodromou, names, religion, Spade.

An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)[1],[2]*

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

1. Scott Douglas Jacobsen: You’re amongst the highest range high-scorers in the niche community of alternative intelligence test takers. First things first, why the “Rat King”?

Marios Sophia Prodromou: I go by many names. There can’t be light without darkness.

2. Jacobsen: What other names?

Prodromou: Caelestis, Spade and Draco to name a few.

3. Jacobsen: What does Caelestis mean in this context? Why select it, or have it endowed to you?

Prodromou: I like to think of myself as celestial or out of this world.

4. Jacobsen: What does Spade mean in this context? Why select it, or have it endowed to you?

Prodromou: I like to dig for knowledge. The Ace of Spades by Motorhead is also one of my favourite songs.

5. Jacobsen: What does Draco mean in this context? Why select it, or have it endowed to you?

Prodromou: Dragon.

6. Jacobsen: Any preferred name out of the many?

Prodromou: Draco Caelestis or celestrial dragon.

7. Jacobsen: What interrelates these meanings (other than the obvious idea of the person, you)?

Prodromou: My knowledge of reality.

8. Jacobsen: What is the meaning of “Rat” and “King” in “Rat King”?

Prodromou: Most people hate rats but they have their purpose. It is better to be a king among rats rather than a peasant among men.

9. Jacobsen: Do you feel hated by “most people”? If so, why? If not, why not?

Prodromou: I do. There is a lot of jealousy in the world and I’m not your ordinary social butterfly. 

10. Jacobsen: Any other animal examples than a rat – perhaps more palatable to the imagination?

Prodromou: Dragon, lion and Eagle. 

11. Jacobsen: What about the queens?

Prodromou: A queen is just as important as a king. 

12. Jacobsen: Do you have a queen?

Prodromou: Sophia.

13. Jacobsen: Do you consider the best minds among the rats/people the “most hated,” and for good reason? Is this a variation on better to reign in hell than serve in heaven?

Prodromou: My birthday this year coincided with the beginning of the year of the rat. Great year it’s been so far. I can’t get Horned rats out of my mind.

14. Jacobsen: Why not simply go by one name?

Prodromou: I strive to be different.

15. Jacobsen: How much, and in what way? Why that degree and manner of different?

Prodromou: If you are one of the many you will always be average. As different ad it gets.

16. Jacobsen: What is the more explicit reference to lightness and darkness? Usually, this comes with some philosophical or theological position on life. Is this the intended meaning?

Prodromou: Lux in tenebris. A more detailed version is found in the Gospel of John. The light shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot comprehend it. I like to be significant but also go about unnoticed.

17. Jacobsen: What about tenebris in lux? What is the meaning of light here rather than a reference? Is this in reference to the light of God and the darkness of the prime fallen angel, prime evil?

Prodromou: Evil depends on intention. A knife can cut your food or can kill somebody. Again I believe in dualism and that evil and good are just different poles of the same coin

18. Jacobsen: What is the origin and meaning of the name Marios Sophia Prodromou?

Prodromou: My grandmother was called Maria and I was also named in honor of the Virgin Mary. My mother had trouble giving birth and prayed to the Virgin Mary to help her conceive. Prodromou is the family name and means forerunner after John the Baptist or Prodromos in Greek.

19. Jacobsen: In this context, what does John the Baptist mean to you, personally?

Prodromou: I like his way of life. Being a loner. He had a bigger role than what he is credited. Just ask the Knights Templars.

20. Jacobsen: Also, what does the Virgin Mary mean to you, personally?

Prodromou: The divine feminine.

21. Jacobsen: What were the forms of parenting towards you, in the context of being rather special child in rarity, in cognition and in odds of conception for your mother?

Prodromou: I was given my space and a lot of love.

23. Jacobsen: What is family history and development as a Cypriot?

Prodromou: Both parents are Cypriots although I was born in Scotland.

24. Jacobsen: What are the values of Scottish society?

Prodromou: Respect for their history. They know where they came from.

25. Jacobsen: How do these mix with the values of Cypriot society if at all?

Prodromou: Cypriots care more about the present than the past.

26. Jacobsen: Are modern Scottish and Cypriot society more at odds or at parallels?

Prodromou: They are very different.

27. Jacobsen: What does being a Cypriot do for personal social and political views regarding Greece, Cyprus, and Turkey?

Prodromou: Both Turkey and Greece have made mistakes. I am a Greek Cypriot but am always open-minded when it comes to politics.

28. Jacobsen: What mistakes has Turkey made?

Prodromou: They are obsessed with world dominance. Killed many innocent people in their endeavors. 

29. Jacobsen: How will Turkish mistakes come to haunt them?

Prodromou: Karma is a bitch not just for Turkey but for everybody.

30. Jacobsen: How many innocents are estimated?

Prodromou: I’d rather not put a number to it.

31. Jacobsen: Is this Erdogan’s attempt at recreation or reconsolidation of the (Neo-)Ottoman Empire through a Turkish expansionism?

Prodromou: Not only Eedogan’s but those that went before him and those that will come after him.

32. Jacobsen: What mistakes has Greece made?

Prodromou: Greeks are obsessed with money. The result is selling out their country. The ministry of defence sold a submarine owned by his military.

33. Jacobsen: How will the Greek mistakes come back to bite them in the behind more?

Prodromou: Already the economy is a mess.

34. Jacobsen: Have the Greeks always been obsessed with money?

Prodromou: Not always. But when they were given a little sugar they developed a sweet tooth.

35. Jacobsen: How accurate is My Big Fat Greek Wedding, the movie, to Greek culture, especially in times of courting and marriage and potential in-law interactions?

Prodromou: It is quite accurate. Parents can become obsessed with their kids. In Scotland they leave the nest at 18 in Greece ans Cyprus they can stay forever. Well at least till marriage.

36. Jacobsen: Have you ever met or interacted with many other 6-sigma, or even 5-sigma, people within the high-IQ community? If so, what was the experience? If not, other than statistical rarity, why not?

Prodromou: I can’t say that I have. They are hard to find and I am highly introverted.

37. Jacobsen: Why so introverted?

Prodromou: I was an only child. I learnt to be my best friend.

38. Jacobsen: Would you like to interact with them?

Prodromou: Not really. I’m a loner.

39. Jacobsen: How was the discovery of giftedness? What is important to bear in mind about alternative intelligence tests? What alternative intelligence tests/non-mainstream tests seem reliable and valid to you?

Prodromou: I scored 98/100 on the old Millers Analogy Test that I used to matriculate into the College of New Jersey Master of Education program

40. Jacobsen: What have been some other tests? What are the implied scores and standard deviations of said scores? What have been the range of the scores from the lowest to the highest?

Prodromou: My highest was 190+ on MACH. I have scored around 170 on tests by Iacovos Koukas. It all depends on how much effort I put into the test. I did my 170 in 2 hours where I took 6 months to answer the MACH.

41. Jacobsen: What is the societal view of giftedness in Cyprus?

Prodromou: I’ve been twice on national TV but I remain an unknown nobody.

42. Jacobsen: Have there been other media opportunities, which you’ve turned down?

Prodromou: Many. I don’t go there for the fame. 

43. Jacobsen: What programs on television? Why agree to appear on those programs?

Prodromou: It helps me gain the trust of the community and be able to help their kids as a mental coach. I went to two well known programs on Cypriot TV. The clips are on my YouTube channel.

44. Jacobsen: On the “Prince Show,” is kissing a common Greek greeting between people – on either or both cheeks? In North America, this would be seen as odd between men. What was the reason for the invitation to the show? What was the main discussion topic? What were some responses to the show? Did you like the appearance?

Prodromou: I won the WGD Genius of the Year for Europe in 2017. The WGD made a press release and I got invited. 

45. Jacobsen: Was part of the purpose to garner the trust of the public?

Prodromou: I don’t like to advertise myself and the public believes anything the media tells them and the public adores celebrities so it was a win-win situation for me.

46. Jacobsen: On the “With Love Christina,” what was the reason for the invitation to the show? What was the main discussion topic? What were some responses to the show? Did you like the appearance?

Prodromou: Again winning the WGD Award.

47. Jacobsen: You seemed nervous in both appearances. Is this an accurate observation? If so, why? If not, why not?

Prodromou: I don’t socialize much. I was out of my water

48. Jacobsen: Do you desire or want to be a somebody rather than a “nobody”?

Prodromou: I’d rather be a nobody. In this earth to be a somebody you need to be a celebrity or have lots of money. I’d rather pass. Knowledge and Sophia for me is more important than money.

49. Jacobsen: Why are knowledge and Sophia sufficient for you?

Prodromou: That is why we are here. To learn and improve. 

50. Jacobsen: Why would most Greeks with an obsession on money choose money rather than their own notions of “knowledge and Sophia”?

Prodromou: They have not studied the occult like me. When you look into the abyss you find that it stares right back at you.

51. Jacobsen: What or who is Sophia (other than a middle name)?

Prodromou: The Goddess of wisdom. The most important figure for Gnostic Christians. 

52. Jacobsen: What kind of knowledge most appeals to personal sensibilities?

Prodromou: As long as it resonates with my intuition. I find it appealing. 

53. Jacobsen: What makes a real genius?

Prodromou: Finding the unknown.

54. Jacobsen: What makes a faux genius?

Prodromou: A good actor like Trump. 

55. Jacobsen: Are there more real geniuses or faux geniuses?

Prodromou: Faux Geniuses for sure. 

56. Jacobsen: What do you make of people who fake striving to be a nobody while being a somebody as their main goal to promote themselves or some idea rather than simply being a nobody, liking it, and preferring being a nobody?

Prodromou: We are all actors and the world is our stage. We have our plays and exits.

57. Jacobsen: What have been some work pursuits for you?

Prodromou: My passion is helping kids excel in sports through mental coaching. 

58. Jacobsen: What is “mental coaching”? What have been the specialities in the forms of mental coaching for you? How do you go about imparting these mental skills to mentees?

Prodromou: Helping the child make faster and better decisions under pressure. I have come up with several strategies depending on the learning style and personality of the child. One size does not fit all.

59. Jacobsen: What kind of pressure?

Prodromou: Playing in a competitive environment in front of people. Even the desire of pleasing our parents or coaches results in pressure.

60. Jacobsen: Fast is time-dependent, therefore relative. How much faster for most of the pupils?

Prodromou: One second too early and you are offside. One second too late and you missed your chance. Just as fast as is needed to made a difference.

61. Jacobsen: What are some of the basic strategies?

Prodromou: Improving focus and concentration. Teaching the kids how to pick up information and how to analyze it to make better decisions.

62. Jacobsen: What are some of the intermediate strategies?

Prodromou: Nothing is set in stone. What works for John doesn’t work for Charlie.

63. Jacobsen: What are the common, uncommon, and rare personality styles of the children?

Prodromou: Every kid is different. That is the beauty of this world.

64. Jacobsen: What intellectual issues impress you?

Prodromou: I am not easily impressed as only a small capacity of one’s brain is used. I believe that there is more to the world than meets the eye. We only see a tiny fraction of the spectrum after all.

65. Jacobsen: Which public and private intellectuals impress you?

Prodromou: I’m not easily impressed.

66. Jacobsen: What have been some educational attainments for you?

Prodromou: I graduated summa cum laude from the University of Indianapolis and finished the Master in Education program of the College of New Jersey with a perfect 4.00 GPA.

67. Jacobsen: What social philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: “The alienation of man thus appeared as the fundamental evil of capitalist society.” – Karl Marx

68. Jacobsen: What political philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: Equal rights and opportunities for all men and women.

69. Jacobsen: What economic philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: “Accumulation of wealth at one pole is at the same time accumulation of misery, agony of toil, slavery, ignorance, brutality, mental degradation at the opposite pole.” -Karl Marx

70. Jacobsen: Who is a favourite philosopher for you? I am sensing Marx or potentially Marx for some reason.

Prodromou: You are correct. 

71. Jacobsen: What religious/non-religious philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: I believe in God but I also believe that there can be no light without darkness. It is not about choosing sides. It is about finding balance.

72. Jacobsen: What is being balanced here? What delineates the light from the dark in personalities and life stances? For what it’s worth, I am reminded of the Grey Jedi.

Prodromou: You won’t see a bear turn the other cheek of her cubs are in danger.

73. Jacobsen: What kind of God makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: A God that is fair and just. That judges a person’s heart and his intentions rather than his accomplishments. 

74.Jacobsen: What is the argument for this God?

Prodromou: Synchronicity.

75. Jacobsen: What is the evidence for this God?

Prodromou: I find that I will always get to where I need to be through a random sequence of events in my life.

76. Jacobsen: What is in most people’s hearts?

Prodromou: Blood.

77. Jacobsen: What is fairness?

Prodromou: Having the same opportunities as everybody else.

78. Jacobsen: What is justice?

Prodromou: If you do somebody wrong that you also will be wronged.

79. Jacobsen: Is there a single term, even a neologism, covering the idea of fairness and justice in unison?

Prodromou: I’m not keen on unions.

80. Jacobsen: Do you believe in a supernatural order, a natural order, or both? Why?

Prodromou: I have had paranormal experiences but let’s leave it at that.

81. Jacobsen: As a detective, one must detect, investigate, and/or inquire – have to ask. What is the definition of paranormal, supernatural, metaphysical, and natural, material, and physical in this context?

Prodromou: Some things need to be seen. They cannot be described. For those that know no explanation is necessary. For those that don’t no explanation is possible.

82. Jacobsen: What is the precise meaning of the idea of a paranormal “experience” within the above-mentioned definition?

Prodromou: I refer you to the above. 

83. Jacobsen: Why does this experience within giving the precise experience, in fact, match the above-mentioned definitions and contextualizations of a paranormal experience rather than simply a natural and normal experience, or event?

Prodromou: I am still experiencing the effects up to this day. 

84. Jacobsen: What ethical philosophy makes the most sense to you?

Prodromou: What is chaos for the fly is dinner time for the spider. 

85. Jacobsen: What worldview brings these together into a neat little package for you?

Prodromou: Thinking outside the box. Nothing is set in stone.

86. Jacobsen: How does the British background influence the personal perception of the Cypriot society?

Prodromou: Small is not always better.

87. Jacobsen: Why is inspiring kids important for you?

Prodromou: I had a tough childhood and know what it feels like to be alone in the world.

88. Jacobsen: How was it “tough”?

Prodromou: Parents were away most of the time and we had little money. I was also bullied in school.

89. Jacobsen: How did you feel alone? How did your mother cope knowing her rare child was alone and living a tough life?

Prodromou: She did the best that she could. I wouldn’t change her for any other mother.

90. Jacobsen: You are a member of “World Genius Directory, Prometheus, Mensa International, Epimetheus, GENIUS Umbrella Organization, sPIqr, Vertex, Grand IQ Society, Tetra, GOTHIQ, LEVIATHAN 160, Triple Nine Society, HELLIQ, The Glia Society, UBERIQ, TENIQ and many others.”

Prodromou: IQ is just a number but it looks good on my resume. It helps me as a mental coach as the parents are more willing to recruit me in order to help their kids.

91. Jacobsen: What societies seem the most reliable in providing a social and intellectual space over a long period of time for members?

Prodromou: Difficult to answer. I mostly join for the card and not the interaction.

92. Jacobsen: What one have you spent the most time interacting with if at all? Why that one?

Prodromou: WGD. I won the award and was their ambassador for a whole year.

93. Jacobsen: What is meant by becoming a person of a value versus becoming a person of success?

Prodromou: Success for many is having lots of money or social status. A person of value however is important to his community for his knowledge and not for his money. 

94. Jacobsen: Does this make value less fungible than money in some fundamental sense?

Prodromou: Only because most people are obsessed with money and not the pursuit of knowledge. In their defence it is a material world after all isn’t it?

95. Jacobsen: Was Madonna right, after all, but for everyone rather than just “girls”?

Prodromou: No money no honey.

96. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, what defines success? What defines value?

Prodromou: Success is different for many people. Value however is making an impact on your community.

97. Jacobsen: What are common notions of success amongst the Greeks other than making lots and lots of money?

Prodromou: Having a good job. Social status. 

98. Jacobsen: What kind of values must one have to make the “value” of “making an impact on your community”? How have you strived to be valuable to community in this manner? Is the sense of “community” local or global here, or simply a

Prodromou: Doing the best for the person that you are dealing with and not for you.

99. Jacobsen: An inference rather than a confirmation. You seem to like esotericism and symbology, including highly symmetrical and complex creations. If so, why? If not, why the complicated symbol systems on social media for you?

Prodromou: A lot of ancient and secret esoteric knowledge has been preserved in symbols. Language has changed and is different for everybody but symbols remain the same.

100. Jacobsen: Why take part in the Dudeist philosophy, as I am, full disclosure, a member too?

Prodromou: I like to be everywhere and am open-minded.

101. Jacobsen: For those who do not know, what is Dudeism?

Prodromou: The Tao. 

102. Jacobsen: How open-minded?

Prodromou: As much as it takes for my brain to fall out of my head.

103. Jacobsen: What other groups have you joined to be “everywhere”?

Prodromou: I can’t mention them as they are secret. 

104. Jacobsen: Any of those who aren’t secret, like the public alternative religious and philosophical groups, e.g., Dudeism?

Prodromou: I’m an Associate member of the American Psychological Association.

105. Jacobsen: What are some characteristics of the secret groups without precise details of them – other than being “secret”?

Prodromou: They find you. You don’t find them.

106. Jacobsen: You work or worked as a postal officer. Why?

Prodromou: The best and most stable job in Cyprus is as a civil servant. It also gives you lots of free hours in the afternoons to pursue other goals and interests. 

107. Jacobsen: I am reminded of old Bill Sidis working at ‘menial’ jobs while writing works on the history of the Americas, etc. Are you writing anything or working on some intellectual problem at this time?

Prodromou: I’m working on self improvement and my esoteric world through the application of hidden knowledge. You can add “mystery man” to the titles that I go under.

108. Jacobsen: Of the parts that are non-secretive and esoteric, what is the esoteric part? Is that Austin “Danger” Powers, man of mystery?

Prodromou: It is the part that “changes” you the most.

109. Jacobsen: What kind of self-improvement?

Prodromou: Receiving an upgrade. Making a better version of you. 

110. Jacobsen: What do you mean only a small capacity of the brain is used? Isn’t this an old and outmoded, i.e., non-empirical, stance akin to the 10% myth?

Prodromou: Only for those that have a large ego. It makes them feel better and that they are intelligent. Most of our thoughts are not even our own. 

111. Jacobsen: Why are more men in the high-IQ societies than the women?

Prodromou: I have the same question. Probably women have other interests as I don’t think it is about intelligence. 

112. Jacobsen: Who do you consider the smartest person in history?

Prodromou: Tesla. 

113. Jacobsen: Why?

Prodromou: He was a loner just like me. A pig of his work is not even known to the general population.

114. Jacobsen: Who do you consider some of the smartest people alive now?

Prodromou: Musk and Gates and even Trump.

115. Jacobsen: Why Musk?

Prodromou: He has a nice girlfriend. 

116. Jacobsen: Why Gates?

Prodromou: He started off with nothing and made billions through his knowledge.

117. Jacobsen: Why “even Trump”?

Prodromou: He is a good actor.

118. Jacobsen: What defines religion and theology?

Prodromou: A strong belief in something and faith in the unknown.

119. Jacobsen: What differentiates the former, a “strong belief,” from a conviction? Is faith a good or a bad thing if the thing is unknown or assumed as such? Many things have been believed on faith without evidence and caused a great many tragedies, and the ones/events/happenings/outcomes in which faith lead to good things; better and more evidenced reasons exist and highly probably existed.

Prodromou: I should have been dead in two car crashes that I have had. Faith is knowing that I’m still here for a reason. I guess it all depends on the person and his experiences.

120. Jacobsen: What is “ancient and secret esoteric knowledge”?

Prodromou: It wouldn’t be a secret if I told you now would it?

121. Jacobsen: What kinds of symbols preserve them?

Prodromou: Many symbols in the occult mainly. Especially those created by John Dee and Aleister Crowley.

122. Jacobsen: What are the main symbols? What are the main interpretations of them?

Prodromou: Again what I know cannot be discussed in public. It is up to every individual to seek the truth if he desires.

123. Jacobsen: Is the truth atheism or theism, or some other category?

Prodromou: The truth is still the truth even if nobody believes it. A lie is still a lie even if everybody believes it.

124. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on atheism?

Prodromou: Everybody has free will to believe or not. I respect their free will not to believe just as long as they respect my right to believe. 

125. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on theism?

Prodromou: Same as above. 

126. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on agnosticism?

Prodromou: Same as above.

127. Jacobsen: What have you mainly learned from purported secret esoteric knowledge?

Prodromou: That there is a purpose to life and not what everybody thinks it is. I have learnt why we are here. 

128. Jacobsen: What are some hints or indications as to the purpose of life?

Prodromou: Improving your inner world and DNA.

129. Jacobsen: What changes in life have come from this for you?

Prodromou: I have a whole new heart.

130. Jacobsen: Why did you pursue this course in life rather than others?

Prodromou: I believe everything else is a distraction.

131. Jacobsen: How do we know it’s ancient knowledge?

Prodromou: I have applied it and have seen the unseen. But you have to take my word for it as hard as that seems. 

132. Jacobsen: Does this not seem like a skirting, or circumnavigating the issue entirely, similar to the promise of unlikely rewards of 72 virgins after death for martyrs in some interpretations of Islamic scriptures – ‘just believe me as you’ll get it after you die, take my word for it’? This sort of argument from authority. What of those who simply cannot ‘take your word for it’ – no matter how hard it may seem – and require more robust responses, e.g., like detectives?

Prodromou: Even if I told you fee would believe. And even those that do believe won’t know how or what to do.

133. Jacobsen: What if what you saw was not the unseen and rather a hallucination or a mere chance coincidence rather than a real experience in true transaction with the external world – between the self and the natural world?

Prodromou: Again, I’m still experiencing the effects of my experience to this day. 

134. Jacobsen: How do we know it’s esoteric and secret rather than simply esoteric knowledge?

Prodromou: What I have seen I doubt many people have seen. 

135. Jacobsen: Does this seem unsatisfying and akin to a non-answer, almost a faux mysticism so as to skirt real explanation through properly verifiable and more reliable means than fallible human experience?

Prodromou: Some things are better left unsaid.

136. Jacobsen: Most Greeks are formal religious, as in Greek Orthodox Church. Why?

Prodromou: That is what they are brought up to believe. 

137. Jacobsen: Is it correct or incorrect as a system of thought, or more wrong or more rights as a theology?

Prodromou: Who am I to judge?

138. Jacobsen: How could this enforced and inertia-based belief in Greek Orthodox Christianity change in the future to a different faith or no faith at all?

Prodromou: I doubt it will change. Religion is strong in Greece and Cyprus and the church has a big role in Society and lots of money and property. The Head of the church can even influence the Government.

139. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, how does this color their image of the nature of world, human beings, and the relations of human beings to one another and the world?

Prodromou: Cultural bias is created that doesn’t allow much room to the individual to explore other ideas and values.

140. Jacobsen: What is creativity?

Prodromou: Tapping into your own intuition to come up with something original.

141. Jacobsen: What is intelligence?

Prodromou: Intuition for me is the highest intelligence. 

142. Jacobsen: Why intuition?

Prodromou: That is where the magic happens. 

143. Jacobsen: Is intuition truly a form of intelligence or more a subjectively formalized, experientially developed sensibility about life and its meanderings?

Prodromou: It is the highest intelligence.

144. Jacobsen: What is genius?

Prodromou: Finding X.

145. Jacobsen: What is purpose of having ancient esoteric secret knowledge in the first place?

Prodromou: “If you die before you die you won’t die when you die.” An ancient inscription written at Mount Athos.

146. Jacobsen: Any idea as to authorship of the inscription?

Prodromou: No idea. 

147. Jacobsen: Why is Mount Athos significant to the Greeks and to Eastern Orthodox monasticism?

Prodromou: It is their holy place. Everybody that is Greek has gone their or will eventually go there at least once in their life time.

148. Jacobsen: Is “ancient knowledge” good or bad? With current advancements, it sounds like “Ancient Grains” or some such thing.

Prodromou: That is the plan. To keep you away from the old. Who says new is better?

149. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on the freemasons in that regard – the society with secrets rather than a secret society?

Prodromou: I respect them although most are pawns and only a handful of those at the highest degrees reach the truth. 

150. Jacobsen: Why does the organization make most of them pawns?

Prodromou: To do their dirty work.

151. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on different Satanist or associated groups including The Church of Satan, First Satanic Church, The Satanic Temple, Luciferianism, Order of Nine Angles, or the Temple of Set?

Prodromou: I respect them as well; although, it is not good to be so fanatic. It does not leave room to explore other paths. Satan was once an angel after all.

152. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on The Church of Satan?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

153. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on First Satanic Church?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

154. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on The Satanic Temple?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

155. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on Luciferianism?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

156. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on Order of Nine Angles?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

157. Jacobsen: Any specific reflections on the Temple of Set?

Prodromou: It is what it is.

158. Jacobsen: Do you believe in literal or metaphorical (or both) angels and demons? If so, how so? If not, why not?

Prodromou: Maybe they work together and are two parts of the same team.

159. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on Anton LaVey?

Prodromou: A genius but his work has been modified.

160. Jacobsen: Has his work been modified for better or for worse?

Prodromou: For the worse. 

161. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on Aleister Crowley or his self-claimed follower Timothy Leary?

Prodromou: Both geniuses although again they have been made out to be the worst possible people to keep society from exploring their work.

162. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on Anton LaVey?

Prodromou: I would have loved to have met him. 

163. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on the nature of good and evil? Does this relate to the aforementioned light and dark before, lightness and darkness before?

Prodromou: Good and evil change and are dependant on your circumstances and are in the eyes of the beholder. A cake is good comfort food unless you have diabetes. Bring those brownies next time you visit. It all depends upon where you are standing.

164. Jacobsen: Any thoughts on those who claim this is moral relativism (usually stated in a derogatory tone)? Where do you stand now, grey one?

Prodromou: I respect their right to believe what they like about the subject and hopefully they will respect mine. 

165. Jacobsen: What is science? What is philosophy? 

Prodromou: Science is when we prove something to be correct through “facts”. Philosophy on the other hand is your “idea” about something. My philosophy is that facts are important but intuition is more important. But you need to be sure it is your intuition talking before acting upon an impulse.

166. Jacobsen: What is a ‘fact’?

Prodromou: 1+1=2.

167. Jacobsen: What is an “idea”?

Prodromou: Something that hasn’t been proven yet to be a fact.

168. Jacobsen: Why does impulse lead to poor decisions?

Prodromou: Not always the case.

169. Jacobsen: What else could be “talking”? What means by which to differentiate intuition from other internal ‘talks’?

Prodromou: Our spirit guide.

170. Jacobsen: What if the Gospel of John alongside of the Synoptic Gospels, indeed the entirety of the Bible – Old Testament and New Testament, amount to fabricated documents or not entirely factual (as a hypothetical)? Now, most historians, secular and religious, agree Jesus Christ existed; however, all of the miracles, violations of the natural laws known today, and the fallibility of the human mind in terms of eyewitness testimony seem important to take into consideration, especially as all of the texts purport eyewitness testimony. Yet, Professor Elizabeth Loftus’s work is clear of the poor data-taking devices of human beings. In that, even if the Christian Scriptures are taken as holy, as inspired, and eyewitness testimonies, they’re still mediated by human sense perception and cogitation leading to the inevitable now-empirical conclusion of highly unreliable sources in eyewitness testimony within the field of cognitive psychology in regards to eyewitness testimony.

Prodromou: They are fabricated documents that have gone through many edits. Doesn’t mean there isn’t any truth to them. You just need to filter out the lies.

171. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, even if we take the explicit reference to the lightness and the darkness in Christian holy texts in a base textual analysis, or even in a detailed Logos oriented interpretation of the Gospel of John starting with John 1:1 to John 1:2 with “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God,” it’s not taken as literal, but as metaphorical. Why need the text to know this? Why have a holy text at all? Why not another fallible, questionable text without the sacred, inspired assertions behind it?

Prodromou: The bible is a story about two tribes.

172. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, what is gained by reference to a particular religious text coming from the ancient world in which philosophy was developed, but science, human rights, and so on, were not? Isn’t this simply outmoded and not needed anymore?

Prodromou: The bible tells us what has come before and what will come in the future. This year alone has been quite biblical for example.

173. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, how would one go unnoticed while leaving a significant trace in the context of a base textual analysis and in the detailed Gospel of John analysis? I am reminded of a Margaret Atwood quote, “I would like to be the air that inhabits you for a moment only. I would like to be that unnoticed and that necessary.”

Prodromou: Just by doing one’s job. The air doesn’t ask why it is there or asks for money to be there. It is invisible but without it humanity would not exist.

174. Jacobsen: What if intuition is simply a poor reasoning apparatus output of the human organism?

Prodromou: Again it depends on your ability to reason. What if our thoughts are nor our own?

175. Jacobsen: When we take some of the more important aspects of individual identity for some members of the profoundly gifted category or the profoundly high IQs, there seems a sense of the alone-ness, in which the individual gifted person’s temperaments and gifts leaves them in a straightjacket in some manner. On the one hand, they know more than most, max out standardized tests of valid types, and can process more quickly, more in-depth, and with greater relatedness in concepts. On the other hand, this sets them apart from ordinary society in a number of regards, which can make them out of sync emotionally and socially with peers due to lack of experience either due to innate factors or more time spent in independent study, or little overlap in ways of thinking for them. It is a sort of unresolvable pickle in the ways in which the species evolved. So, in some ways, tough, get used to it, while, on the other hand, how do these individuals find a place in society for some level of optimal fit for them? How have you dealt with this coming to terms with the world?

Prodromou: We are not pieces In a jigsaw puzzle. Some of us don’t need to fit in.

176. Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, some will take a certain attitude of outright antagonism to the idea of coming to terms with the world exhibiting itself in opposition to standard sources of authority and structure and organization within the society, including established religions, governmental structures, and elders and experts within the society. This can take forms of delusions of grandeur, opposition defiance disorder, and simply taking the path of molasses all through life, which, naturally, comes with lifelong consequences for them. Any words of advice or guidance to younger members of the profoundly gifted cohort who could use some guidance in this regard?

Prodromou: Be your own person.

177. Jacobsen: For those parents with a profoundly gifted child, who can be ten years old while functioning at the intellectual capacity of a an average eighteen year old or more, what is some advice for them in terms of nutrition, fitness, and intellectual challenge?

Prodromou: Listen to the child and what he or she wants.

178. Jacobsen: When it comes to girl-girl time, boy-boy time, boy-girl time, what are some difficulties for some members of the profoundly gifted community who happen to exist in milieu of same-age peers and no peers intellectually, in a time of first finding lust and love while not having the requisite emotional maturity – even feeling intensely while lacking experience to buffer the intensity to socially and interpersonally appropriate levels?

Prodromou: This world is not ideal for everybody. It is a rich man’s world but I’d also say the better one looks the easier it is to fit in.

179. Jacobsen: How does 1-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 2-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Not very much.

180. Jacobsen: How does 2-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 3-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Again not very much. 

181. Jacobsen: How does 3-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 4-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Not very much.

182. Jacobsen: How does 4-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 5-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Not very much.

183. Jacobsen: How does 5-sigma intelligence on the right-side of the bell curve differ from 6-sigma intelligence in terms of behavioural and verbal proxies?

Prodromou: Not very much. One sigma differences are insignificant. I doubt anybody can tell the difference between a 5 and 6 sigma dude just by chatting to them.

184. Jacobsen: How can societies emphasizing excellence more than equity cheer on and support the profoundly gifted and talented members of its communities?

Prodromou: Intelligence will always be repressed. Governments don’t like intelligent people that can think for themselves

185. Jacobsen: What do you consider some of the oldest secret societies?

Prodromou: The Knights Templars. 

186. Jacobsen: What seems like the general idea, while not stating the content, of many of the secret societies and the alternative theistic groups like the freemasons?

Prodromou: Self improvement and the quest for the holy grail.

187. Jacobsen: What annoys you?

Prodromou: People who think that they are always right and not open to new ideas.

188. Jacobsen: What makes you feel more at ease, at peace, with the world?

Prodromou: Not thinking about the world and not reading the media or watching TV. 

189. Jacobsen: Would you ever plan to move away from Greece-Cyprus-Turkey area back to the United Kingdom or some other place? If so, why? If not, why not?

Prodromou: I don’t plan my life. I am spontaneous and may take off one day.

190. Jacobsen: Most of the more intelligent people in history known have some – what I call – lifework. Some pursuit covering a large part of their lives, in spite of the chaos, nonsense, and personality quirks that may be part and parcel of the personality behind the lifework. Do you have a lifework? If so, what? If not, why not?

Prodromou: My pursuit was my inner world. Making a better version of me. No time for anything else. 

191. Jacobsen: How would you characterize the general life trajectory for you?

Prodromou: It’s hard to define.

191. Jacobsen: Where would you like your life to end up?

Prodromou: In the unknown garden of Nemo.

192. Jacobsen: What is metaphysics?

Prodromou: Why we are here.

193. Jacobsen: Why choose metaphysics from Dudeism?

Prodromou: Why we are here is a question that I have been trying to answer since I were a kid.

194. Jacobsen: Who do you consider the most creative person in history?

Prodromou: DA VINCI. 

195. Jacobsen: Who do you consider the best writer in history?

Prodromou: Shakespeare.

196. Jacobsen: What are the typical societal expectations of Greek heritage women? What are the typical societal expectations of Greek heritage men?

Prodromou: Getting married and finding a nice spouse.

197. Jacobsen: What are some cultural nuances largely known only to the Greeks about the ways in which men and women, old and young, blue-collar and white-collar, and so on, exist in Greek society, in Cypriot society, and in the diaspora with Greek heritage in terms of a sense of extended identity in the Greek people?

Prodromou: I’m not the best one to answer this question. I don’t socialize enough to know. 

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] 190+ S.D. 15 on the MACH, Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: July 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2020: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One) [Online].July 2020; 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, July 1). An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A, July. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020. “An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 23.A (July 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 23.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 23.A (2020):July. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. An Interview with Marios Sophia Prodromou on Names, Metaphor, Cyprus, Greek Heritage, Genius, Religion, Mysticism, and More (Part One) [Internet]. (2020, June 23(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/prodromou-one.

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© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

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