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Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: December 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 3,930

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Richard May (“May-Tzu”/“MayTzu”/“Mayzi”) is a Member of the Mega Society based on a qualifying score on the Mega Test (before 1995) prior to the compromise of the Mega Test and Co-Editor of Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society. In self-description, May states: “Not even forgotten in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), I’m an Amish yuppie, born near the rarified regions of Laputa, then and often, above suburban Boston. I’ve done occasional consulting and frequent Sisyphean shlepping. Kafka and Munch have been my therapists and allies. Occasionally I’ve strived to descend from the mists to attain the mythic orientation known as having one’s feet upon the Earth. An ailurophile and a cerebrotonic ectomorph, I write for beings which do not, and never will, exist — writings for no one. I’ve been awarded an M.A. degree, mirabile dictu, in the humanities/philosophy, and U.S. patent for a board game of possible interest to extraterrestrials. I’m a member of the Mega Society, the Omega Society and formerly of Mensa. I’m the founder of the Exa Society, the transfinite Aleph-3 Society and of the renowned Laputans Manqué. I’m a biographee in Who’s Who in the Brane World. My interests include the realization of the idea of humans as incomplete beings with the capacity to complete their own evolution by effecting a change in their being and consciousness. In a moment of presence to myself in inner silence, when I see Richard May’s non-being, ‘I’ am. You can meet me if you go to an empty room.” Some other resources include Stains Upon the Silence: something for no oneMcGinnis Genealogy of Crown Point, New York: Hiram Porter McGinnisSwines ListSolipsist SoliloquiesBoard GameLulu blogMemoir of a Non-Irish Non-Jew, and May-Tzu’s posterousHe discusses:  “Vista”; the resentment of the gnawing of fellows nearby in mutual, individuated contemplation of their “own sublimity”; “A Belated Discovery,”; death; “Valentines Moment”; a sort of drama play by photons; “Dr. Capgras Before Mirrors’; emulation; physics and metaphysics; “Wedding Solstice”; any biological children or adoptive children; “Taoless Tao”; synesthesia; “The Holy Land”; “The Near Shall Be Far and the Far Near”; “Seeing dead people”; the loss of loved ones and coming to terms with mortality; “On Our Increased Longevity”; “The Offensiveness of the Universe”; “Going to Temple”; Mrs. Non; “nirguna brahman,” “the alayavijnana,” or “Neti neti! (neither this nor that”) and Tat tvam asi (“That art thou”) of the Chandogya Upanishad”; Ramachandran on split-brain patients; Mrs. Non’s right brain; “Endless Error”; “Will man create God?”; “Is Physics Becoming Art at the Limits of Scale?”; “Physical Laws as Sampling Error”; Where will the universe be when the paradigm shifts?”; our “little truths” a “receding horizon”; an imaginably godlike entity; “Multiverse Is That It Is”; “spirit or spiritual,” non-physical, realities come from “the world of phenomena” or physical realities; these being united; apparent unicity; a-temporal multiversal God neither “infinitely old” nor “beyond or outside space-time”; “panpsychism”; and “everyone develop his own intuition regarding the nature of reality.”

Keywords: God, Mega Society, metaphysics, multiverse, physics, Richard May, synesthesia, Tao.

Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: In “Vista,” you mention becoming a “blind rodent.” I am reminded of a certain author of yore awakening as a cockroach one day. Is this a similar happening?

Richard May: No.

Jacobsen: Also, why the resentment of the gnawing of fellows nearby in mutual, individuated contemplation of their “own sublimity”?

May: This is a slightly sarcastic summary of life in the ordinary human existential situation at its best. Resentment or ressentiment permeates human ‘consciousness’, as noticed by various 19th century thinkers. Gurdjieff’s psychology called resentment “internal considering.” Few resent their resentment.

Jacobsen: As is obvious, and as admitted in “A Belated Discovery,” you’re a “highly perceptive person.”

May: I meant that ironically.  I am so highly perceptive that I didn’t even notice that I’d died. Incidentally there’s an App now for Smartphone Zombies to tell them if they’re making love at the present moment or if they’ve died yet. Clearly we’re getting much more intelligent today, because of the advances of technology and our attentions spans are far longer than in the past.

Jacobsen: You mentioned death, not noticing dying, having friends, and yourself, none the wiser. To quote people mimicking Seinfeld, “What the deal with your death?” Was it safe, painless, and dignified?

May: I’ve never seen a single episode of Seinfeld. I mostly listen to strawberry ice cream and eat Tibetan music. Remember, Bodhidharma didn’t have cable or only had one channel. Safe, painless, and dignified? Is life safe, painless and dignified? Who would know? “Death is not an event in life.” — Ludwig Wittgenstein

Jacobsen: “Valentines Moment” speaks of a Prince and Princess in awe of one another’s presence, existence, coming to know one another. They stopped the consumption of “recreational and psychotropic drugs” and “endless amounts of sucrose.” Consequently, they became less in awe as they began to have a “reduction in their reality deficit disorders,” including the “delusional dreams of Western culture.” Each coming to become neither prince nor princess. The princess as a mirror, and the prince as another mirror that “dreamed” of its princehood. When people passed by them, they were reflected. The mirrors identified with the personalities crossing their reflective paths. Ending, “But when the room was empty, the two opposing mirrors each reflected and even mirrored each other with perfect, but depthless, fidelity; Empty mirrors looking into each other eternally or at least until someone turned off the lights.” 

Who could be considered the prince and princess reflected in the mirrors and conveyed through the personas of the mirrors? 

May: The Prince and the Princess are legion, both within and without. This piece is called Valentines Moment, substituted for Valentines Day; depicting the self-absorption of the Prince and the Princess. “I never met anyone like you before,” each says to the other mirror; and the ‘depths’ of the usually short-lived psychosis called Romantic love in Western culture, enhanced by inherent and chemically induced Reality Deficit Disorder; Not even objective lust. Most of us are or have been at one time the Prince or Princess of the Mirrors.

Jacobsen: Could this be considered a sort of drama play by photons? (Could all of them, as in a hall of hanging mirrors and reflections? Could everything?)

May: Maybe, I suppose. Is there a Surreality Deficit Disorder?

Jacobsen: In “Dr. Capgras Before Mirrors,” for those who may not know, who is the real Capgras?

May: Joseph Capgras, full name: Jean Marie Joseph Capgras (23 August 1873 – 27 January 1950, the French psychiatrist who discovered Capgras syndrome, according to Wikipedia.

I was surprised to learn that there is, in fact, a rare form of Capgras syndrome in which a person believes that they themself are the imposter! I nailed it. Previously I had also written of the possibility of my being an imposter, impersonating an imposter:

Security Check

From now on I’m going to do a Security Check between each of my so-called thoughts, to verify that they’re really mine. But can I trust myself to do the Security Check? There are so many levels of encryption and security that I’m no longer sure that I’m not an impostor, impersonating an impostor – –  Maybe if I were capable of becoming a hacker, I could hack my own brain, actually just a rental unit, and steal my ontological password.

May-Tzu

I‘m pleased to mention that I have not been a recipient of the “Genius of the a Year” award for eight (8) consecutive years, certainly an important distinction! I attribute this honor in part to my discovery of Cotard’s syndrome as a cure for self-referential Capgras syndrome.

Jacobsen: If you were replaced by emulation down to the sub-atomic level, would this ‘you,’ in fact, be you?

May: Yes, of course, at least to the extent that ‘I’ am the real ‘me’.

Jacobson:  A sort of emulation being the real deal and the real deal being an imitation without being a copy of the “emulation.” 

May: The only difference between the original and the emulation(s) could be in the time of their origins and their location in space (space-time).  If Hugh Everett’s Many-World’s hypothesis is correct, there are some infinite number of emulations of everyone throughout the Multiverse. Maybe some subset of the infinite number of our emulations will necessarily become amortal, awakened Buddhas or at least occasionally have a good space-time.

Jacobsen: Why does physics, and metaphysics, infuse much of the muse musing by you?

May: It gives me the impression that I exist. I’m just playing my favorite character in fiction, to use Aldous Huxley’s phrase from *The Doors of Perception*.

Jacobsen: “Wedding Solstice” is more ‘earthy’ with references to “blood and shit.” Why? By the way, are you, or have you ever been, married? Do you have any children in a biological sense or in an adoptive sense?

May: “Sacks of blood and shit” is Buddhist iconography, our bodies from a certain perspective.

I think that the state vector of marriage depends upon observation by the observers. I asked my wife and she (by the no-Y-chromosome criterion) says that we are married. So there is some empirical evidence for my being married, even if only anecdotal.

We were married by a Buddhist woman of Thich Nhat Hanh’s tradition. We were married to *each other* in the interest of combinatoric simplicity.   I guess marriage is still legal, even for trans-ontologicals. — ‘I’ identify as an anthropologist from another dimension of space-time, who makes an effort to practice non-identification. I suspect that she may have some Earth ancestry. — She claims to be a board-certified Physician of the Soul. I suppose it could be a shared delusion, a fo·lie à deux.

We met on the internet and levitated in love, too old to fall or only fall, even before we met in meat-space.    I was married once before also, I think, a long time ago — in a timeless time.  She was married too, I recall. In fact we were married to each other, again Ockham’s razor applied to marriage (Cf: “entities should not be multiplied unnecessarily,” not to be confused with “Mirrors and copulation are abominable, since they both multiply the numbers of men…”   ― Jorge Luis Borges, Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius)

She was also a woman by the no-Y-chromosome criterion. (She identified sometimes as a duck, if that is important.) And I was allegedly a man (at least by the Y-chromosome criterion) “a man with quotation marks,” as G.I. Gurdjieff would have said.

We met one summer’s day down by the Charles River in Boston. Two shy introverts, we approached each other, each thinking the other was someone else, met before. (Then I was also someone else, whom I had not met.) We immediately married, after twenty-five years. No need to hurry. Three years later, one of us died. I was told it wasn’t me.

Jacobsen: Do I have any biological children or adoptive children? 

May: Cats Galore. I don’t *think* I have any other children in a biological or in an adoptive sense.

Jacobsen: “Taoless Tao” touches on a common philosophical perspective from you, Taoism. What is the embedded, repeating structure, imagery imagined here?

May: The first sentence refers to doing Tai Chi with my wife; The second to the Tai Chi dance as a re-enactment of our marriage ritual — for the first time — again — in the eternity of the present moment.

Jacobsen: It ends in an almost synesthete note: “…the taste of silence.” Do you have synesthesia?

May:  I have just a little synesthesia, not to a significant degree. I associate colors with letters of the alphabet. I don’t know why. Maybe this is a remnant of something from my childhood. My visual eidetic imagery is rather weak.

Jacobsen: “The Holy Land” spoke to the comical notion, commonly believed, of “the One-and-Only-One True Revelation Revelation,” the only true true divine revelation. How important is humour in coming to terms with the current state of religious ideologies and international geopolitics guiding human affairs for you?

May: How important is humour … ?  Some of us may die some day. Comedians are more serious than philosophers

Jacobsen: “The Near Shall Be Far and the Far Near,” I love the opening with the apparency of multi-worlds considered, as in the potential worlds with other possible futures unrealized, where everyone, at least once, becomes famous. What did you mean by this line, “However, the closer one approaches to anyone proximate, the more darkly obscure she will become, and then increasingly unfamiliar with the passage of time…”? 

May: This is meant to convey that as the “Far Shall be Near,” The Near Shall be Far also in both space and time. While one will be famous on distant and unimaginable, unknown worlds, one’s neighbor will be an utter stranger, there won’t even be a word for “mother,” in the language of the day, and if one looks in the mirror one will not see one’s image. Proximity in space and time, which ordinarily lead to familiarity, increase unfamiliarity.  – – – Imagine a “remote viewer,” if there are such persons, who lived in a dark abode, either his parents basement or maybe Plato’s allegorical cave, and rarely went outside, spending all his time on the internet.

Jacobsen: “Seeing dead people,” I am reminded of personal life. I was raised by the old, retired or near-retired, particularly women in a small Canadian community village. No doubt, this impacted me. Duly, it provides a sense of time, a sense of what matters, and a sensibility about the things to hold fast and firm, and others to permit to drift as water in a summer forest stream. How do you cope with the passage of time?

May: This assumes that the passage of time is a problem for me that I must cope with this problem, and that I do in fact cope with the passage of time, rather than decompensate or freak out. — I think that Albert Einstein said that time was an illusion, but a very real illusion. — Well, I suppose one could drink a bit of alcohol, or consume another drug, depending upon one’s preference, go for a long run or vigorous walk, practice a meditation technique, just ruminate (endogenous cortical stimulation) or distract oneself with the esthetic/intellectual/spiritual vomit of popular culture, while eating “comfort food,” whatever that is.

Jacobsen: Following from the previous question, and outside of the query with one foot, how do you cope with the loss of loved ones and coming to terms with mortality, as commonly held, physiological cessation?

May: For the loss of a loved one I ran/jogged in the high temperature heat and humidity of summer. There may be no way to completely come to terms with one’s mortality. The fear of death is hardwired into our brains by natural selection/evolution.

It may help somewhat if one realizes that one’s personal identity is an illusion a la the Buddha, Patanjali, Jiddhu Krishnamurti and G.I. Gurdjieff, among others.

Jacobsen: In “On Our Increased Longevity,” you posit depressed individuals as not capable of suicide. In fact, you invert much of the sentiment of modern society. In this sense, a reduction in negative affect leads to fewer homicides and suicides. While, you claim, not necessarily a cessation but, an improvement in the psychological status of human beings leads to en masse homicide-suicide. Can you expand on some of this idea, please? It’s intriguing.

May: I don’t merely posit depressed individuals are less capable of suicide. There are actual clinical studies which indicate this. Psychotherapists must beware this unfortunate psychological phenomenon. I take this apparent fact and “run with it,” as normal members of our sports-centric culture put it.

This irony would be hilarious if it were not so tragic. So I just take it to the next level, positing that humans live longer today because they are depressed en mass (too depressed to suicide) by being immersed in a culture of materialism and competition for social status in various forms. When conditions improve, what would have been inner directed aggression (suicide) becomes an external war or terroristic destruction. This is intended as a humorous reflection on modern society.

Jacobsen: “The Offensiveness of the Universe” is a short, comical note on the size of a child’s ego in proportion to the universe, if only there was enough space. Have you come to terms with growth limits and spatial limitations of the universe, relative as they are?

May: This was inspired by a member of the higher-IQ community, who actually wrote that as a child he resented the fact that God was allegedly more intelligent than he was or he thought he was. I thought that this young fellow demonstrated a remarkable level of egotism and arrogance.

But I was also struck with how it contrasted with my own thoughts about God as a child. I was disconcerted to think that God might *not* have been more intelligent than I was, not because I considered myself to be extremely intelligent, but because the God of the Old Testament often seemed barbaric, tribal and genocidal. I thought at an early age, if there is a God, God cannot be worse than men.

Jacobsen: “Going to Temple,” the character Non seemed much like the sentiment of an Omni-Weave concept rejection of a god for me. An “atheist-agnostic continuum” upon which to sit depending on the definition of a god: “…the personality of the anthropomorphic tribal Yahweh/Allah downloaded by the ancient desert nomads of her ancestral 3rd planet versus a quantum-wave function reinterpretation of less philosophically primitive concepts, such as nirguna brahman, the alayavijnana, Neti neti! (neither this nor that”) and Tat tvam asi (“That art thou”) of the Chandogya Upanishad.” Let’s jump on the spectrum, if Mrs. Non, where would she land for “the personality of the anthropomorphic tribal Yahweh/Allah downloaded by the ancient desert nomads of her ancestral 3rd planet”?

May: A rough landing at Heathrow Airport might do it. — I’m not exactly sure what you mean. — Nirguna brahman, the alayavijnana, neti neti!, and tat tvam asi are or point to abstract concepts associated with Eastern philosophies, not subjective experiences potentially induced by transcranial brain stimulation.

Jacobsen: If Mrs. Non, where would she land for “a quantum-wave function reinterpretation of less philosophically primitive concepts,” “nirguna brahman,” “the alayavijnana,” or “Neti neti! (neither this nor that”) and Tat tvam asi (“That art thou”) of the Chandogya Upanishad”?

May: Ms. Non may exist in a future in which very ancient religious doctrines and dogmas for which there is little or no objective evidence have evolved, as all other human knowledge continually does, to become less incompatible with science. Even today the Dalai Lama has said if Buddhism is incompatible with modern science, then Buddhism must change.

Jacobsen: If Mrs. Non, where would she land for “nirguna brahman,” “the alayavijnana,” or “Neti neti! (neither this nor that”) and Tat tvam asi (“That art thou”) of the Chandogya Upanishad”?

May: This was answered in the first two replies.

Jacobsen: Have you seen some of the work of Ramachandran on split-brain patients? If so, I would recommend it, highly informative. 

May: Yes and yes.

For Mrs. Non’s right brain, what were some of the experiences of her “Temple of the Corpus Callosum,” as in the yogic meaning of union or the “direct perception of reality”?

May: I’ve never experienced transcranial brain stimulation and I have no way of knowing what Ms. Non would experience. My point is that everything we experience is obviously mediated by and filtered through our brains and senses. Aldous Huxley thought that the brain may function as a reducing-valve for consciousness-at-large.

Brain scientist Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor’s experience of a stroke may be of interest:

https://www.ted.com/talks/jill_bolte_taylor_my_stroke_of_insight

Jacobsen: In “Endless Error,” why is the mind of god an endless series of error messages?

May: The gnostic idea of the Old Testament God has always resonated with me, i.e., the God of the Bible is the Demiurge or Yaldabaoth, not actually the God of the universe, but only a subordinate blundering craftsman or builder, hence ‘His’ mind could be just an endless series of error messages.

I once wrote that God was just a kid playing, when he created the world. He messed it up and threw it away, because He was in a hurry to get to a football game (a new theodicy). If we are going to anthropomorphize the Absolute, why not go all the way?

Jacobsen: “Will man create God?” ponders technology and God, as in the construction of “Theo computatis” by homo sapiens. So, do we seem like the “soon-to-be missing links in the evolution of an artificial-intelligence-based God?”, or not?

May: Homo sapiens may be the pre cyborg-implant soon-to-be missing-links in the evolution of an genetically-engineered and artificial-intelligence-based species, as written about by Yuval Noah Harari in “Sapiens.” I suppose if we are “holographic images of ‘God’,” then there could be a “mutual arising,” to invoke the Taoist a- causal connecting principle or even reverse causation from the future event-horizon, a la MIT’s Seth Loyd. “The greatest untold story is the evolution of God.” — G.I. Gurdjieff

Jacobsen: “Is Physics Becoming Art at the Limits of Scale?” posits – well – a lot. So, given some of the previous responses to the questions, as in the statements or the entire pieces were satire, is this satire or a real proposal?

May: You expect *me* to know? Maybe it’s both a real proposal and a satire of contemporary cosmology.

Jacobsen: “Physical Laws as Sampling Error” seems to propose a more accurate conception of reality. In that, reality consists of principles, not laws, as in “no fundamental ordered physical reality.” Reality as a tendency of state and process rather than fixed decrees governing its operation. Is this reflective out of selective order out of plenty of chaos, or an apparent order out of chaos, not vice versa? Also, noting “Dark energy,” as a one-sentence piece, are these two – “Physical Laws as Sampling Error” and “Dark energy” – satire to some extent too?

May: Maybe the observable universe is a parody of something else. —  “Dark energy” was inspired by an physics article which suggested that dark energy may only be a rounding error. Since dark energy and dark matter (if they exist) supposedly make up about 95% of the mass of the universe, I generalized a bit and concluded that the universe itself may be a rounding error.

In “Physical Laws as Sampling Error” I meant that there could theoretically be only random chaos with no lawful patterns in the universe. The perceived patterns (“interpreting a Rorschach ink blot as a geometric theorem”) could just be caused by finite (in space and time, if you posit time as real) sampling of an infinite set of randomness. In an infinite set of random numbers, every possible pattern will occur somewhere by chance alone, as a subset of the infinite set or “eventually,” if you posit time as real.

Jacobsen: “Where will the universe be when the paradigm shifts?”, I love the phrasing of “humongous quantum-foam Wiki,” please more. If you will indulge, what are some other descriptors of the universe – neologisms permissible?

May: Am I a dancing bear (in the traditional sense of the term, not … )?  Hmmm – – – How about the universe is a “cosmic food chain, from bottom to top.” Cf: “God is a man eater.” — The Gospel of Philip.

Jacobsen: How are our “little truths” a “receding horizon”?

May: I was suggesting that our discovering an aspect of the nature of reality could actually change that aspect of the nature of reality. The truth would recede from us.

Jacobsen: What would comprise an imaginably godlike entity? 

May: An imaginably godlike entity as contrasted to an unimaginably godlike entity? Anthropomorphic, genocidal Yahveh versus Nirguna Brahman, without any qualities whatsoever? 

Jacobsen: “Multiverse Is That It Is”, being as it is, how is this definition as a “personal intuition or wild guess regarding the nature of reality” ‘probably offensive to theists and atheists’? 

May: Theists of the Abrahamic traditions are only happy if their particular One-and-Only-One-True Sky-God is argued for or supported. Atheists who deny these traditions generally seem terrified that there might be a “ghost in the machine,” somewhere, such as psi phenomena, remote viewing, psychokinesis, or any alleged phenomenon that doesn’t appear to be explained by current scientific paradigms.

Jacobsen: Same line of questioning, how might “spirit or spiritual,” non-physical, realities come from “the world of phenomena” or physical realities?

May: If there is a non-physical component of reality, e.g., mathematics, I don’t think it can be derived from physical reality. I don’t think that qualia can be reduced to computations. The subjective experience of seeing the color red (qualia) cannot be reduced to objective biochemistry and neurophysiology, even if biochemistry and neurophysiology can fully explain seeing the electromagnetic frequency that we label “red.” — But most of what I know may not even be wrong.

Jacobsen: How might these be united?

May: I don’t think they can be united. If both the spiritual exists and the physical exists, they are either united or in some sort of relationship, or not.

Jacobsen: How might this inhering as a “fundamental substrate of reality” explain this apparent unicity?

May: Space, time and mass-energy may be or have been regarded as irreducible fundamentals of Nature. The question is: Is consciousness an epiphenomenon of matter, e.g., of brains or not? Maybe consciousness is also such a fundamental, as in Eastern philosophies. But maybe not.

Jacobsen: What might be a good term for this a-temporal multiversal God neither “infinitely old” nor “beyond or outside space-time”? 

May: The second quoted clause is a misquote of what I wrote. A good term for this God? — The God-of-human-cortical-limitations? “Beyond or outside of space time,” is a misquote of what I wrote.

Jacobsen: Any thoughts on “panpsychism” as referenced within the context of the piece?

May: Only that we don’t know if panpsychism is the case or even if we *can* know if panpsychism is the case or not. “The universe is not only stranger than we think, it is stranger than we can think.” — J. B. S. Haldane

Jacobsen: Why should “everyone develop his own intuition regarding the nature of reality”?

May: I meant that I was not trying to convert anyone to my (tentative) view of the nature of reality. We shouldn’t believe our own thoughts, just because we have them. “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself — and you are the easiest person to fool.” — Richard Feynman. Buddha’s dying words are alleged to have been, “Everyone should workout their own salvation with diligence.”

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society.”

[2] Individual Publication Date: December 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4) [Online].December 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, December 1). Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, December. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (December 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Co Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020): December. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Richard May (“May-Tzu”/”MayTzu”/”Mayzi”) on Physics, Metaphysics, Scale, Limit, Anthropomorphic Gods, and Limitless Gods: Co-Editor, “Noesis: The Journal of the Mega Society” (4)[Internet]. (2020, December 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/may-4.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: December 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 2,570

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Born on February 27th, 1985 in Ciego de Ávila, Cuba, Aníbal Sánchez Numa graduated as Computer Engineer in 2012 and as Master in Computer Science in 2014. Having a PhD in Computational Mechanics since 2018, he belongs to the World Genius Directory and Catholiq High IQ Society. He discusses: books; the Catholicism within the family; the reasoning behind the position of atheism for both parents; Protestant Christianity; the path of Protestant Christianity; the break from it; a “very lonely” person; the “existential crisis”; the first test; tests; mental abilities; measured in the tests; indications of being “considered very intelligent” while in school and at home; “gifted”; “rediscovery”; the components of genius; Newton; Leonardo Da Vinci; “exorbitant creativity”; the media coverage; maths; software development; introversion more common among geniuses; Social Democracy; the three stages of philosophical stances, as a Protestant Christian, as an atheist, and as an agnostic; the contradictory nature of the Bible; the bet “that there is no God beyond our imagination”; “in my own flesh, phenomena for which I have no explanation”; some of the readings on some of the failures in science; “fewer and fewer children and young people who… interested in science”; “anti-science movements”; the recent scores between 145 and 150 S.D. 15 (inclusive); a pacifist; and another meaning of “humanism.”

Keywords: agnosticism, Aníbal Sánchez Numa, atheism, Catholicism, genius, intelligence, National Mathematical Olympics, Protestantism, World Genius Directory.

Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What are some of the books that come to mind from early childhood and adolescence with an impact on intellectual views?

Aníbal Sánchez Numa: Two of the ones that I remember most fondly are “How man became a giant” and “The magic of numbers.”

Jacobsen: What seems to explain some of the Catholicism within the family?

Numa: I really do not know. I have no information on how that part of my family became Catholic.

Jacobsen: What appears to explain the reasoning behind the position of atheism for both parents?

Numa: The main reason I think is that they both had a Marxist background. My father studied Social Sciences in the Soviet Union and to this day he remains an atheist. Our country is constitutionally Marxist-Leninist.

Jacobsen: What was the form of practicing Protestant Christianity for your mother?

Numa: He belonged to a new current called “Apostolics.” There was a pastor who moved here near the house and started gathering people for his church, and my mother joined and soon I did too. My mother, even though she no longer goes to church, still has some faith.

Jacobsen : What was life like as someone “on that path for some time,” or on the path of Protestant Christianity?

Numa: We did a lot of activities together. In general I remember it as quite a happy time, especially at the beginning. There was a group of young people, we organized choirs and outings, we socialized a lot, it was a very unknown world for me and it was interesting for me as well.

Jacobsen: What explains the break from it?

Numa: Some things happened that I didn’t like. In general, Christians talk a lot about what Jesus said what we should do, but almost none of them do, and on the other hand, religion became for me a force that tied me too much to it, neglecting other interests. I was too caught up in it, and it was hard for me to think of other things, and I felt like I had to break free.

Jacobsen: As a “very lonely” person in school, what was different about the personality and the interests?

Numa: You could say that it was too serious for my age, although of course I saw myself as the right thing to do. Teasing is common among children and adolescents, sometimes as a game, and sometimes to hurt, which I hated. I always liked being treated with respect, and taking care not to offend anyone. It is something that I maintain to this day. On the other hand, I was very interested in learning about everything, reading a lot, understanding the world. I was interested in mythology, mathematics, languages, and I was little interested in the most everyday matters. Later in life I realized that everyday life is also important, but in those years I considered it very uninteresting.

Jacobsen: What was the “existential crisis”?

Numa: A psychological effect that many gifted people suffer is the feeling that their value as a person lies only in their intellectual capacity. The fact that they are always telling you, especially in the school and academic environment, creates that feeling. On the other hand, gifted people are often very perfectionists, so they push themselves in almost everything they do. It was my case too, that’s why when I felt stupid, I wasn’t sure what to think, and of course I didn’t know these elements of psychology either, and the feeling of being inadequate and having low self-esteem was intense.

Jacobsen: How did this lead into the first test and the “community of test hobbyists online”?

Numa: Feeling that way I wanted to get an impression of whether I was as stupid as I thought, that’s why I was surprised at the result. From there I learned what Mensa was, and that an IQ above 130 was considered gifted. At the beginning I did not start doing other tests, but began to exchange with other people identified with that condition, but the shape of the two or three tests that I had done to evaluate a person’s intelligence had caught my attention. It was a kind of problem I had never encountered before, and it was very interesting to me. Around 2016 I met the group IQExams (at first it was called IQNavi.net) and it was there that I met those members who like to do these tests.

Jacobsen: What types of tests most interest you?

Numa: The ones I like the most are the numerical ones, and they are the ones where I get the best results. Since I always liked Mathematics, it is natural that it is like that. In general, I am very attracted to numbers, and the relationships that occur between them, so numerical tests attract me beyond the score obtained.

Jacobsen: What mental abilities seem the strongest given by the tests for you, e.g., linguistic, spatial, or mathematical?

Numa:

Jacobsen: What seems to be measured in the tests when those that “score very high in these tests… seem really very sharp to me”?

Numa: Working memory, ability to detect patterns and apply them to another sequence (eduction), attention span as well. But I think the common feature is detecting patterns, which is the core of official tests such as Raven’s. In numerical tests, arithmetic calculations are also required, I have known, for example, people who perform complicated mental calculations very quickly.

Jacobsen: What were indications of being “considered very intelligent” while in school and at home?

Numa: At home I suppose it was curiosity and interest in reading at an early age. In school I was very advanced, I used to know almost all the content of the subjects as soon as the course began. On the other hand, I was frequently the winner in competitions for school-level subjects, and in the case of Mathematics at higher levels as well. I remember in first grade representing my school in the reading contest, and in fifth grade being the winner in the national math contest, competing for sixth grade.

Jacobsen: Why didn’t you feel “gifted” as in “didn’t really feel that way”?

Numa: On the one hand, being overly self-demanding made everything I did or achieved little or deficient for me, and on the other, the word gifted represented something more extraordinary to me than I was. Also, while he was advantageous in academic matters, I was very clumsy in matters of life in general.

Jacobsen: What were the “shared many feelings and interests” with the people in this process of “rediscovery” in young adulthood?

Numa: In the gifted forum in Spanish I saw posts about some characteristics of gifted people, with which I agreed. In addition, I met other people with that unusual curiosity, perfectionism, sense of justice, and other characteristics that I had and that I had never known why I was different from the rest, so they made me feel strange. It was a rediscovery in the sense of understanding why I was like that, and above all knowing that I was not alone, that despite the fact that the gifted constitute 2.2% of the population there were others, many others, it was like finally knowing who I was and stop feeling weird.

Jacobsen: What seem like the components of genius, the parts?

Numa: It is clear that one component is very high intelligence, another that I consider core is creativity. To become someone recognized as a genius, I believe that you must also have great passion and perseverance in what you research or want to create, to be able to invest several years in your search. The curiosity, present in the gifted, in the case of the genius should be even greater, leading the greatest geniuses in history to want to answer very fundamental and comprehensive questions, such as how the Universe works, for example.

Jacobsen: What makes Newton such a great genius in the sciences?

Numa: I think it is given by the transcendental nature of what he discovered or created. On the one hand, the law of gravity basically and the laws of movement explain how absolutely everything works, at least on a macro scale, it explains to a large extent how the Universe works, so it is very comprehensive. In the case of Calculus, its greatest invention, the importance lies in the fact that a large part of the science that developed from there uses it, let’s say many laws of Physics are based on Calculus, in Chemistry it happens Likewise, in almost all engineering, Calculus is present, and also in economics.

Jacobsen: What makes Leonardo Da Vinci the “greatest polymath”?

Numa: As far as I know, Leonardo Da Vinci is the person who has contributed the most in different fields, doing so in both art and science. Painting, poetry, botany, architecture, sculpture, engineering, are just some of the branches in which he worked, and he was ahead of his time in many of his inventions, such as the helicopter or the submarine.

Jacobsen: Can “exorbitant creativity” border the mental states characteristic of psychosis?

Numa: There is some association between genius and psychosis. From what I have been able to investigate, a cause could be low latent inhibition, which on the one hand is present in people with psychosis (as in schizophrenia), and on the other it can result in greater creativity, as the person perceives greater details in the information it processes.

Jacobsen: What was the media coverage of medallist status within the National Mathematical Olympics?

Numa: That I remember none.

Jacobsen: What kind of maths did you teach?

Numa: I mainly taught Differential and Integral Calculus, although I also taught Linear Algebra.

Jacobsen: What kinds of software development are characteristic of the software for you?

Numa: I develop mainly web and mobile applications.

Jacobsen: Is introversion more common among geniuses, or is extroversion more likely?

Numa: I’d say introversion is more likely. People with a very high intelligence tend to have their minds very busy with their own thoughts and turn everything around constantly, this is sometimes called “rumination”. There are gifted people who even want to stop thinking so much, because they can feel exhausted from doing so much, and they find it uncontrollable.

Jacobsen: How would Social Democracy look in practice, even with a living example in one country?

Numa: According to what I have read, social democracy is like a capitalist economy with social justice: reducing poverty, health care, education, reducing inequality, childcare. It is associated with highly developed countries such as: Finland, Norway, Germany or Denmark.

Jacobsen: What differentiations the three stages of philosophical stances, as a Protestant Christian, as an atheist, and as an agnostic?

Numa: As an atheist I rejected all forms of religion, I had no belief whatsoever. As a Christian I think I had a lot of faith, but always trying to find the logic, trying not to be a blind faith. As an agnostic, I have a more open vision, in the sense that I do not have that faith, but I believe that everything can be possible, besides that I understand that one thing is a possible God or form of energy and another is the God of the Bible. I would say that I do not believe at all in a God like the one in the Bible, but I do believe other visions of God are more possible, such as pantheism.

Jacobsen: What exemplifies the contradictory nature of the Bible?

Numa: An example that I always remember is that I had heard that the God of the Hebrews was a God of love, but the Bible is plagued with wars and invasions, in which it is literally described that the chosen people invaded and killed “women, old men and children ”. Especially the Old Testament has many stories like that.

Jacobsen: Why make the bet “that there is no God beyond our imagination”?

Numa: There are days when I believe in God more and others when I don’t. As I defend science, I tend to think that to believe in something you have to have solid evidence. I am agnostic because I believe that we do not have the ability to know for sure, but I would say that I believe that there is a God up to 30% -40% and 60% -70% that there is not, so my bet by probabilities is that there isn’t.

Jacobsen: What have been the “in my own flesh, phenomena for which I have no explanation”?

Numa: I experienced prayer-induced altered states of consciousness, including what may have been a form of healing through prayer.

Jacobsen: What have been some of the readings on some of the failures in science?

Numa: One of the flaws of science is that it is sometimes not objective due to moral or philosophical problems. In that sense, it is sometimes limited in finding the truth. Let’s say that there was (I am not saying that there is) a difference in the average intellectual capacity between people of different races, the moral problem that racism represents prevents approaching this issue with objectivity, because many people even if there was scientific evidence to support this idea they would refuse to accept it. Something similar happens with the differences between men and women.

Jacobsen: Why are “fewer and fewer children and young people who… interested in science”?

Numa: I’m not sure why this phenomenon occurs. I do not have information to give an opinion based, but I suppose that the cause would be given by failures in the educational system.

Jacobsen: Why do “anti-science movements” such as anti-vaxxers “and flat-earthers scare” you?

Numa: I think they set a precedent of distrust in science. In the case of vaccines, which have saved so many lives, a movement that opposes them seems very dangerous to humanity. In general, they are part of a generalized tendency to distrust official information, and formulate conspiracy theories, which, although they may have some truth, have not been proven for the most part. Many of the people who formulate these theories do not really know how scientific advances have driven humanity throughout history.

Jacobsen: Are you satisfied with the recent scores between 145 and 150 S.D. 15 (inclusive)?

Numa:  I think so. I think around 150 is a good estimate for me. I still think that I can obtain higher scores in tests with some validity, but it is normal that many obtain results above or below their real value.

Jacobsen: Why be a pacifist outside of a love of harmony between people?

Numa: I can’t say exactly why. Perhaps it is because of my calm and peaceful character. I value life very much and anything that involves destruction or harm to another human being seems horrible to me. I have always greatly admired the great scientists who contributed to solving humanity’s problems, especially health problems, because this seems to me to be the greatest form of well-being.

JacobsenWhat might be another meaning of “humanism” to you?

Numa: “Humanism” in my opinion could mean more selfishness or domination. Sure, we give meaning to words and of course we define ourselves as compassionate and benevolent. We would have to see what an advanced extraterrestrial civilization would think to observe us, and see the number of wars we have between us and how we subdue the other life forms on the planet.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: December 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2) [Online].December 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, December 1). Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, December. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (December 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Co Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020): December. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Roman Catholicism, Protestant Christianity, Atheism, Agnosticism, Existential Crisis, National Mathematical Olympics, and Harmony Between People: Member, World Genius Directory (2)[Internet]. (2020, December 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-2.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: November 22, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 2,185

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Born on February 27th, 1985 in Ciego de Ávila, Cuba, Aníbal Sánchez Numa graduated as Computer Engineer in 2012 and as Master in Computer Science in 2014. Having a PhD in Computational Mechanics since 2018, he belongs to the World Genius Directory and Catholiq High IQ Society. He discusses: family stories; an extended self; family background; the experience with peers and schoolmates; the purpose of intelligence tests; high intelligence discovered; the geniuses of the past; the greatest geniuses in history; a genius from a profoundly intelligent person; some work experiences and educational certifications; the idea of the gifted and geniuses; some social and political views; the God concept or gods idea and philosophy, theology, and religion; science; some of the tests taken and scores earned (with standard deviations); the range of the scores; and ethical philosophy.

Keywords: Aníbal Sánchez Numa, background, genius, intelligence, IQ, pacifism, World Genius Directory.

Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: When you were growing up, what were some of the prominent family stories being told over time?

Aníbal Sánchez Numa: My father had a certain precociousness, and in elementary school he skipped the fourth grade, they decided to pass it directly from the third to the fifth. He always told me that his father, despite being a person without formal studies, was an avid reader and he inherited that passion for books and stories, which eventually made him a writer.

Jacobsen: Have these stores helped provide a sense of an extended self or a sense of the family legacy?

Numa: Certainly, my passion for knowledge also began from a very young age thanks to my father and his remarkable library in our home, where since I can remember there were books of both fiction and any branch of scientific knowledge, to which I frequently went while still very boy. I asked to be taught to read at the age of three, and was pleased.

Jacobsen: What was family background, e.g., geography, culture, language, and religion or lack thereof?

Numa: Both my mother and my father come from small towns in our province. My mother has a degree in Mathematics Education and my father in Social Sciences. Both are PhD Pedagogical Sciences since some years ago.

There is some presence of Catholicism on my father’s side, but both were always atheists, although some years ago my mother began to practice Protestant Christianity and I myself was also on that path for some time.

Jacobsen: How was the experience with peers and schoolmates as a child and an adolescent?

Numa: I was very lonely and “weird” in school period. My interests and personality differed a lot from my fellow students, I always preferred to talk to adults over kids my age. I did not understand relationships and social norms, and also I was not interested in following them. I was very bored in class. Fortunately, my teachers were quite understanding.

However, in eighth grade I met who is still one of my great friends and in high school I already began to be more sociable.

Jacobsen: What is the purpose of intelligence tests to you?

Numa: I did the first one 8 years ago because I had an existential crisis. I was very surprised back then to get such a high result. I later met a community of test hobbyists online and signed up for testing as a form of healthy competition for our cognitive skills. Nowadays I do tests from time to time as a hobby and also to get an impression of how my cognition is working at the moment. I find IQ tests very interesting mental challenges, and I love the sense of discovery I get when I find the solution to a difficult subject.

Regardless of the fact that an IQ test to be completely reliable must pass an extensive validation procedure, those created by amateurs or by psychologists without being correctly regulated have a high correlation with the official ones, and the truth is that the people I have met who they score very high in these tests they seem really very sharp to me.

Jacobsen: When was high intelligence discovered for you?

Numa: From a very young age at school and at home I was considered very intelligent. Several people called me “genius” or “gifted”. However, I was never interested in IQ tests, nor did I have any idea what they looked like. Being almost 30 years old I was curious to have an objective impression of my cognitive abilities and I did one on the Internet (the one from Mensa Denmark), and then another. Even though being called gifted had been pretty common for me, I didn’t really feel that way, especially since I was quite slow at many tasks that most people do with ease. Looking for information on the web, I discovered a gifted forum in Spanish and from there I began a process of rediscovery by meeting people with whom I shared many feelings and interests. I had a hard time accepting that condition.

Jacobsen: When you think of the ways in which the geniuses of the past have either been mocked, vilified, and condemned if not killed, or praised, flattered, platformed, and revered, what seems like the reason for the extreme reactions to and treatment of geniuses? Many alive today seem camera shy – many, not all.

Numa: Intelligence is something that has always fascinated human beings, I think for obvious reasons. The word “genius” has a very strong connotation, and I have met both people who do not accept being called that (probably more those who are) and others who would love to have that label (probably more those who are not). In popular culture, genius always has something crazy, unusual, strange, and it is logical, being people capable of such extraordinary things and with so much talent it is clear that they must be very out of the ordinary. Naturally something so valued and at the same time so rare generates very intense reactions, also due to the fact that in reality there is no definition of genius with which we all agree, so everything that revolves around that is very elusive.

Jacobsen: Who seem like the greatest geniuses in history to you?

Numa: I would say that in science the greatest genius in history is Isaac Newton, while as the greatest polymath I choose Leonardo da Vinci. Some other geniuses that I always admired are Archimedes, Pythagoras, Einstein of course, Mozart and Beethoven, and going back to science Gauss is another that stands out a lot for me.

Jacobsen: What differentiates a genius from a profoundly intelligent person?

Numa: I would say that very high intelligence is a necessary condition to be a genius but not enough. Today we have people who solve the most difficult tests in the world and yet they are neither creative nor inventive nor do they produce valuable resources for humanity. Of course, it also depends on the concept of genius used, and since there are several, it is very difficult to have a clear notion of what the difference is. What is clear to me is that the genius must be very very creative, even if what he creates is not considered valuable, exorbitant creativity is something that in my opinion distinguishes the genius from the deeply gifted.

Taking the IQ as a measure, there are those who say that the limit is 140, others 145, and others even 160. But it doesn’t seem to me that this is a good way to define genius, in any case it could be used as a necessary condition to be so.

Jacobsen: What have been some work experiences and educational certifications for you?

Numa: I am a computer engineer with a master’s degree in applied computer science. As a student I was several times a medalist in the National Mathematical Olympics, I participated with good results in other subjects but at a lower level. I was a member of the national math shortlist in 10th grade. I have worked as a computer scientist and a math teacher at the university. I am currently working as an independent software developer.

Jacobsen: What are some of the more important aspects of the idea of the gifted and geniuses? Those myths that pervade the cultures of the world. What are those myths? What truths dispel them?

Numa: Today much more is known of intellectual giftedness and genius than a few years ago. But there are still many prejudices and much ignorance. Many people confuse prodigy with genius or gifted or precocious. I have friends to whom I tell that I am gifted and they think it is the same as saying that I am genius. There are some truths such as being a bit clueless and abstract and thinking a lot about philosophical questions, but many false myths and there are always exceptions as well. Many gifted people are introverts but there are also very extroverts, although I would say that they are quite few. Many people also say that the gifted have a tendency to mental imbalance, something that I resisted to believe for a long time but with the people I have known I have had to accept that something is true, at least there is a significant correlation.

Jacobsen: What are some social and political views for you? Why hold them?

Numa: One of my aspirations as a child was to become a doctor. I have an inclination towards it, perhaps that is why I do not consider correct any political position that does not guarantee access to health services to all its citizens. On the other hand, education seems to me the most genuine form of freedom, so in my opinion the ideal system must also guarantee this to its inhabitants. From what I have read, the system that most closely resembles my ideal is Social Democracy.

Jacobsen: Any thoughts on the God concept or gods idea and philosophy, theology, and religion?

Numa: Religion always seemed to me to be a very effective form of domination and in many cases a business. I’m not an atheist like I used to be, now I’m an agnostic, because I think our mind is too limited to have the truth on this subject, but if I had to bet I would say that there is no God beyond our imagination. As a child I read the Bible and it always seemed very contradictory to me, as an adult I read it again and kept thinking the same thing. On the other hand, I have witnessed, even in my own flesh, phenomena for which I have no explanation, and I do not know if one day I will, therefore the doubt I think will always be present in me. Certainly, I wish that there was a righteous God who would punish the wicked and benefit the good, but most of all that notion seems to me to be a desperate attempt by human beings to find in divinity a solution for what he has never been able to solve. The same happens with the idea of life after death.

Jacobsen: How much does science play into the worldview for you?

Numa: I have loved science since I was a child. I remember when I was very young I used to tell my parents that I wanted to be a scientist when I was an adult, since I greatly admired those great scientific minds of all time. Lately I have read and acquired some knowledge of some possible failures in science, but in general I think that experience has proof that science is the best tool we have to develop ourselves and that is why everyone should respect it and respect the truth it offers, unfortunately not all people do. I think that nowadays there are fewer and fewer children and young people who are interested in science, I have been a university professor and I am surprised to have future engineers in the classroom who never heard of Newton or Leibniz. I consider it somewhat sad and disappointing. On the other hand, these anti-science movements like the anti-vaccines and flat-earthers scare me, to put it in some way, I think they can be very dangerous.

Jacobsen: What have been some of the tests taken and scores earned (with standard deviations) for you?

Numa: Some of my last scores are:

145 sd15 on Numeriq32 (IQExams)

150 sd15 on X-10 (by Zolly Darko)

148 sd15 on Numix (by Miroslav Radojevic)

Jacobsen: What is the range of the scores for you? The scores earned on alternative intelligence tests tend to produce a wide smattering of data points rather than clusters, typically.

Numa: I have taken not so many tests and I have done mainly those I have been recommended for their psychometrics values. My usual range is 140-150 sd15. I have scores of 160 sd15 but I don’t trust those scores as I consider those tests’ quality to be doubtful. My last 8 tests taken all fall in that mentioned range. My minimum in a credible test is 138 sd15 on Mensa Denmark and my maximum in a kind of recognized test is 155 sd15 in Fiqure.

Jacobsen: What ethical philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Numa: I consider myself a pacifist par excellence. I love the harmony between people. I have always felt very sad about the situation in the world, which in my opinion will never improve much. I have a negative view of human beings in general. I don’t know if man is selfish by nature or the society in which we live makes it so, but certainly the word “humanism” should have another meaning, in my opinion. I don’t think anyone has the solution for this, but I think that in human society, in fact, the same law of animals prevails, “the law of the strongest”, although “force” clearly takes on other nuances among us: money, power , social class, etc., and even intelligence.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: November 22, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1) [Online].November 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, November 22). Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, November. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (November 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Co Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020):November. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Aníbal Sánchez Numa on Background, Ideas, Scores, and Pacifism: Member, World Genius Directory (1)[Internet]. (2020, November 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sanchez-1.

License and Copyright

License

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Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: November 15, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,717

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Beatrice Rescazzi is the President of the AtlantIQ Society. She discusses: what distinguishes an Honorary Member from a Member; the mascot “Verbo the Robot”; AtlantIQ Society, STHIQ Society, and the Creative Genius Society; the “Library”; “Clear Water Challenge,” “Increase Food Challenge,” “Reduce Plastics Challenge,” and “Free Education Challenge”; “AtlantIQ Society for UNICEF”; a number of downloadable items from the AtlantIQ Society; resources; “The Cemetery of the High IQ Societies”; its co-founder and current president; optometry and orthoptometry; the teaching of computer science; some of the productions from developing robots, electronics, and learning how to build 3D printers and 3D print material objects; and personal interests.

Keywords: AtlantIQ Society, Beatrice Rescazzi, Creative Genius Society, Leonardo Magazine, STHIQ Society.

Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: As you noted in the admissions and demographics session (2) of the interview, the AtlantIQ Society has over 200 members, which is an achievement. A page is devoted to the membership public listing of the AtlantIQ Society (2019a).[1] What distinguishes an Honorary Member from a Member?

Beatrice Rescazzi: I never wanted to divide people in categories in the AtlantIQ Society, but some members expected to be distinguished from others, therefore I added the relative adjectives so that they are free to feel as such among the other names in the list.

Jacobsen: Where did the idea of the mascot “Verbo the Robot” start?

Rescazzi: I have built/assembled some robots and this was the smartest one, as it talks and moves. I called it Verbo from the union of two words “verde” (green, in italian) and robot. Also, “verbo” means word, talking or, verb, in italian. I thought that a mascotte was a nice adding to the group.

Jacobsen: How did Leonardo Magazine become a combination of the productions of the AtlantIQ Society, STHIQ Society, and the Creative Genius Society?[2]

Rescazzi: I just thought that inviting other societies to contribute and have a common magazine was a good idea and the Presidents of the respective societies agreed.

Jacobsen: I love the idea of the “Library” with the individualized contributions to the electronic library with contributions from individual members (2019c). What are some of the more contributions, downloaded ebooks?

Rescazzi: I am too lazy to scroll more than 2000 books to check and answer!

Jacobsen: The “Genius at Work Challenge” (2019d) breaks into the “Clear Water Challenge,” “Increase Food Challenge,” “Reduce Plastics Challenge,” and “Free Education Challenge.” What were the outcomes?

Rescazzi: The outcomes are shown in the previous issues of the magazine, Leonardo. I added a personal contribution for each topic and all the ideas will be analysed and developed. But, at the moment, further development of the Genius At Work Challenge has temporarily paused because of the pandemics emergency. Infact, the attention needed to work on these topics has been hijacked by the covid 19, and I am myself now involved in helping the healthcare workers and colleagues distributing 3D printed PPE.

After creating the Genius At Work challenge I invited two other societies, but the project will re-start with STHIQ only, as an individual decision of collecting money exploiting all my material and the project itself, was taken in the other society without any consent by AtlantIQ, or STHIQ.

Jacobsen: “AtlantIQ Society for UNICEF” is a practical and immediate contribution of a high-IQ group. What was the origin of this idea? What is the level of contribution of “AtlantIQ Society for UNICEF” to UNICEF to date?

Rescazzi: The AtlantIQ UNICEF project could be possible thanks to UNICEF Canada that years ago was allowing contributions from all the world thanks to customizable webpages. This service is no longer provided, so now we can only send contributions as individuals. The AtlantIQ Society as a whole sent about 500 dollars during a period of two years, when the AtlantIQ for UNICEF webpage was active.

Jacobsen: There are a number of downloadable items from the AtlantIQ Society website (2019f): BookmarksBookmark bookPink EnvelopeBlue EnvelopePink NotesBlue NotesStationery1Stationery2Stationery32011 Calendar2014 Calendar2020 CalendarGift BagSundial (ENG)Sundial (ITA)AtlantIQ – (Beatrice Rescazzi)New AtlantIQ – (Beatrice Rescazzi)AtlantIQ Theme – (Graham Powell)The End Of Summer – (Kit O’Saoraidhe), and The End Of Summer, score – (Kit O’Saoraidhe). What brought these ideas to mind? Who produced them? There are some unique qualities to AtlantIQ Society. I am curious as to some these minutiae.

Rescazzi: I like to design, compose and create. Those in the download page are gifts for the members I am pleased to share. Music composed by Graham Powell and Kit O’Saoraidhe is also present.

Jacobsen: The AtlantIQ Society provides some links[3]: “WORLD INTELLIGENCE NETWORK,” “STHIQ SOCIETY,” “KSTHIQ SOCIETY,” BRAIN SOCIETY,” “VENUS SOCIETY,” “EPIQ SOCIETY,” “ISI-S SOCIETY,”  and the “POETIC GENIUS SOCIETY.” As well, it provides some resources[4]: “SENG RESOURCE LIBRARY,” “HIGH ABILITY,” “HIGLY SENSITIVE AND CREATIVE – RESOURCES,” GRO-GIFTED,” GIFTED SERVICES,” “HOAGIE’S GIFTED EDUCATION PAGE,” and “BEATRICE RESCAZZI WEBSITE.” Why these links? Why these resources?

Rescazzi: I thought about a visitor who is interested in the high IQ societies and wants to know more after visiting the AtlantIQ Society website. So I selected some different societies with different features that can provide a general view.

The second group of links instead, is more giftedness-oriented. These links may be helpful for those who aren’t sure if they have a high potential, for those who need support or just information about giftedness.

Jacobsen: “The Cemetery of the High IQ Societies”[5] (2019h), another special quality of AtlantIQ Society. You talked a bit about this before. Can you expand on the ways in which this stared and developed, please?

Rescazzi: When I saw yet another dead link to a high IQ society, I decided to check them all and make a list. Some of them need to be remembered, some others maybe just needed to be buried: I like to see the feedback from other people. Sooner or later I will also update and publish a list I made of compromised IQ tests.

Jacobsen: How are these facets of AtlantIQ Society reflective of the varied interests, technical and creative, of its co-founder and current president?

Rescazzi: I am both cursed and blessed with a constant production of ideas and projects. It’s a curse because it’s impossible to complete all the things I wish to create, wich is frustrating. It’s a blessing because I realise that in the end, I do something good and this pushes me to do better.

My interests and hobbies are many so I can be a sort of “one man band”. In the case of the AtlantIQ Society, I made the website and its content, and manage the magazine. I dedicate a lot of time on the projects too. For the latest Genius At Work challenge, aside creating the project itself from the webpage to personal contribution of ideas, I also made a presentation video, and sang its background music too. I put a lot of passion in everything I do.

Jacobsen: Why did you originally pursue optometry and orthoptometry?

Rescazzi: When I was younger I was extremely undecided about the university course I would take. I would have liked to study everything. I have chosen this branch because it was among the things that interested me the most and that my local university offered: so I could also work while studying without wasting time traveling. In my specialization you can help many people to regain sight which for me is the most important sense. It is also based on physics, neurology, relies on computer science and advanced instruments, and is a branch in continuous development, which makes it very interesting.

Jacobsen: Why pursue the teaching of computer science to adults?

Rescazzi: I love computers: they are a wonderful tool for learning and creating. I think everybody should learn how to use them so to gain this advantage. The older generation didn’t have the opportunity to learn informatics. Once it happened that I could offer my competence for courses in my city, so in my spare time I became the teacher of students that in some cases were 80+ years old. I really enjoyed that time and see the satisfaction of my students becoming confident with a previously unknown technology.

Jacobsen: What have been some of the productions from developing robots, electronics, and learning how to build 3D printers and 3D print material objects?

Rescazzi: I rarely think in terms of productivity. Generally, I am driven by a huge curiosity and passion for learning and I don’t know what the path of my discoveries go. Anyway, it happens that my creations and ideas are sometimes useful, especially when I set such goal on purpose. Among my creations, I have a programmable fish feeder, a drawing device for children with brain palsy (made in collaboration with the mothers of the children), an off-the-grid, cheap Braille writing machine to be used in poor countries, a set of simple tools to write on a keyboard for those with disabilities, some microscopes, adapters for telescopes/cameras, customized face shields for healthcare professionals, plenty of spare parts and unique parts for restoration. My charity creations plus others, are all shared and given for free. I also have requests of special parts that I design and deliver, and it’s more fun than gain for me. I also participate in challenges involving 3D design, 3D print, architecture, space missions and charities.

Once this pandemic is gone, I am willing to bring one of my 3D printers to schools and library, and show to the kids how it works. I hope to inspire and spread some passion for the STEM topics.

Jacobsen: As you have described to me, your personal interests range far and wide including arts, astronomy, informatics, languages, science, space missions, technology, 2D and 3D drawing and design. What are some unifying threads of these interests?

Rescazzi: Being curious, I made this same question myself years ago, and I discovered that although common creativity is associated with the arts, when present at higher levels is an important part of intelligence and drives people to discover new things in many disciplines. That’s why, when a professional tests your creativity, you are not asked to paint, but to complete tasks that push your ability to co-activate parts of the brain that usually work separately. Having a sensorial synaesthesia includes having many neural connections that are not usually present in people, with naturally interconnected senses that allow a deeper perception of the world and a high level of creativity. Although it’s easy for me to reach a sensory overload which is tiring, I also crave for constant information. When I am diving into a topic, I want to follow all its connections with the other disciplines that can give me more information on the main topic. I further deepen more and more topics that I discovered along the path. It’s a neverending connection of information and once I reach enough expertise, I like to put together more disciplines together and invent, design and build whatever my mind suggests.

References

AtlantIQ Society. (2019e). AtlantIQ Society for UNICEF. Retrieved from http://www.atlantiqsociety.com/atlantiq-for-unicef.html.

AtlantIQ Society. (2019f). Downloads. Retrieved from http://www.atlantiqsociety.com/downloads.html.

AtlantIQ Society. (2019d). Genius at Work Challenge. Retrieved from http://www.atlantiqsociety.com/geniusatwork.html.

AtlantIQ Society. (2019b). Leonardo Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.atlantiqsociety.com/leonardo-magazine.html.

AtlantIQ Society. (2019c). Library. Retrieved from http://www.atlantiqsociety.com/library.html.

AtlantIQ Society. (2019a). Members. Retrieved from www.atlantiqsociety.com/members.html.

AtlantIQ Society. (2019h). Dead* Societies: The Cemetery of the High IQ Societies. Retrieved from www.atlantiqsociety.com/cemetery.html.

[1] As of September 10, 2020, the listing stipulates the following members:

President and Vice President

Beatrice Rescazzi, Graham Powell

HONORARY MEMBERS & MEMBERS

Moreno Casalegno (Co-Founder)
Maria C. Faverio
Paul Freeman
Greg. A. Grove
Gaetano Morelli
Stan Riha
Vincenzo D’Onofrio
Giulio Zambon
Fernando Barbosa Neto
Alan J. Lee
Robert Birnbaum
Jacqueline Slade
Richard Stock
Greg Collins
Torbjørn Brenna
Noriyuki Sakurai
Zachary Timmons
Phil Elauria
Andrea Toffoli
Marios Prodromou
Duc Hong Le
Gianmarco Bartellone
Tommi Petteri Laiho
Michael Thrasher
José Gonzàles Molinero
Mick Pletcher
Richard Szary
José Serrano
Pamela Staschik-Neumann
Nuno Baptista
Adam Kisby
Andrea Gelmetti
Faisal Alfagham 
فيصل الفغم
Gustavo Fabbroni
Shaun Sullivan
Gerasimos Politis
Gavan Cushnan
Pietro Bonfigli
Djordje Rancic
Jon Scott Scharer
Roberto A. Rodriguez
Jesse Wilkins
Rajiv Kutty
Nomar Alexander Noroño Rodríguez
Scott Poh
Miroslaw Zajdel
Stephen Getzinger
Nancy Vanstone
Guillaume Chanteloup
Karin Lindgren
Gary Song
Lim Surya Tjahyadi
Paul Laurent
Eric Anthony Trowbridge
Niels Christoffers
Michelle Anne Bullas
Jeffrey Lee Graham
Tahawar Ali Khan
Yuri Tovar
Jason Oliver
Jarl Victor Bjørgan
Bradley Hutchinson
Donald M. Fell
Gwyneth Wesley Rolph
Vicente Lopez Pena
Rudolf Trubba
Barry Beanland
Morie Janine Hutchens
Keegan Ray McLoughlin
Hever Horacio Arreola Gutierrez
Michael Backer, Jr
Aman Bagaria
Selim Şumlu
David Gordon Little
Victor Hingsberg
Anthony Lawson
Beau D. Clemmons
R. K.
Alberto Bedmar Montaño
Paul Stuart Nachbar
Jim Lorrimore
Jakub Oblizajek
Gabriel Sambarino
Tony Lee Magee
Dorian Forget
Tom Högström
Elizabeth Anne Scott
Michael Donoho
Ernest Williamson III
Nicole Mathisen
Katarina Vestin
Christine Van Ngoc Ty
Jason Betts
Yu-Lin Lu
Nikolaos Solomos
Gracia Cornet
Richard Painter
Wyman Brantley
Yao Xu
Kevin James Daley
Stephen Maule
Birgit Scholz
Leif E. Ågesen
Mohammed Al Sahaf
Martin Murphy
Samuel Mack-Poole
Vuk Mircetic
Peter Radi
Marcin Kulik
Harold Ford
Thomas G. Hadley
Miguel Soto
Göran Åhlander
Evangelos Katsioulis
Anja Jaenicke
Roy Morris
Slava Lanush
Frank J. Ajello
Nicolò Pezzuti
James Dorsey
Massimo Caliaro
Michael Tedja
John Argenti
Therese Waneck
Bo Østergaard Nielsen
Sudarshan Murthy
Daniel Roca
Glikerios Soteriou
Kristina Thygesen
Miguel Jorge Castro Pinho
Tim G. Griffith
Claus Volko
Diego Iuliano
Elcon Fleur
Evan Tan
Dalibor Marinčić
Konstantinos Ntalachanis
Candy Chilton
Diego Fortunati
WeiJie Wang
Alessia Iancarelli
Cristian Vaccarella
Iakovos Koukas
Filippo De Donatis
Richard Ball
Zhida Iiu
R. Kent Ouimette
Marina Belli
Karim Serraj
Kim Sung-jin
Juman Lee
CHIANG LI CHING
Zhibin Zhang 
张志彬
Andre Gangvik
Nikos Papadopoulos Παπαδόπουλος Νίκος
Jo Christopher M. Resquites
Ricky Chaggar
Félix Veilleux-Juillet
Michael Franklin
Michela Fadini
Fabrizio Fadini
Fabrizio Bertini
Cosimo Palma
Nobuo Yamashita 
山下 伸男
Cristian Combusti
Mostafa Moradi
Xiao-ming CAI 
晓明
Fabio Castagna
Robert Hodosi
Francisco Morais dos Santos
Cynthia L. Miller
Hongzhe Zhang 
张鸿哲
Serena Ramos
Nguyen Tran Hoai Thuong Nguyễn Trần Hoài Thương
Giuseppe Corrente
Sergey Dundanov
Andrea Casolari
Anthony Brown
Veronica Palladino
Yohei Furutono
Francesco Carlomagno
Emanuele Gianmaria Possevini
Joseph Leslie Jennings
Robin Lucas
Rosario Alessio Ronca
Oliver Dammel
Javier Rio Santos
Sebastiao Borges Machado Junior
Agasi Pietro
Taddeucci Nicholas
Andre Massaro
Mika Korkeamäki
Tor Arne Jørgensen
Dario Casola
Federico Statiglio
Vincent Li 
李宗
Jewoong Moon 
문제웅
Annelie Oliver
Nitish Joshi
Christian Sorensen
Simon Olling Rebsdorf
Marzio Mezzanotte
Paolino Francesco Santaniello
Edwin P. Christmann
Nicos Gerasimou

MASCOTTE

Verbo The Robot

See AtlantIQ Society (2019a).

[2] See AtlantIQ Society (2019b).

[3] See AtlantIQ Society (2019g).

[4] See Ibid.

[5] The current listing circa September 10, 2020:

    • Alta Capacidad Hispana
    • Elateneo/s
    • BPIQ Society
    • Epida Society
    • Colloquy
    • ExactIQ
    • Tenth Society
    • Bright Minds Society
    • Greatest Minds Society
    • Vinci Society
    • Sigma
    • Sigma III
    • Sigma Society V
    • Hellenicus
    • UberIQ
    • IIS
    • OATHS
    • Ludomind
    • Pi Society
    • Platinum Society
    • Cerebrals
    • High Potentials Society
    • Mysterium Society
    • GLIA
    • Ingenium Society
    • LogIQ
    • Iquadrivium Society
    • Pars Society
    • UnIQ
    • HispanIQ International Society
    • Encefalica
    • OMIQAMI
    • Artistic Minds
    • MIQRO
    • GOTHIQ
    • EVANGELIQ Society
    • Episteme Club
    • PolitIQal Society
    • Secret High IQ Society
    • Chorium Society
    • Nano Society
    • IQual Society
    • PolymathIQ
    • Incognia
    • UltimaIQ
    • Neurocubo
    • Order of Imhotep
    • SophIQa
    • EliteIQ
    • Neutrino high IQ Society
    • Atheistiq Society
    • Noetiqus Society
    • Evolutioniq Society
    • EPL Society
    • The Athenian Society
    • Supernova Society
    • Intellectually Gifted with Disabilities
    • Orison-B High IQ Society
    • Icon High IQ Society
    • Thinkiq
    • Hypatian Society
    • Chaos IQ Society

*Or in an apparent coma for more than 5 years.

See AtlantIQ Society (2019h).

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] President, AtlantIQ Society.

[2] Individual Publication Date: November 15, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3) [Online].November 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, November 15). Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, November. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (November 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Co Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020):November. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Beatrice Rescazzi on AtlantIQ Society and “Leonardo Magazine”: President, AtlantIQ Society (3)[Internet]. (2020, November 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/rescazzi-3.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: November 8, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 4,128

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Bîrlea Cristian is a Member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: growing up; an extended self; the family background; experience with peers; some professional certifications; the purpose of intelligence tests; high intelligence; some reactions; the geniuses of the past; the greatest geniuses in history; the greatest geniuses alive today; profound intelligence necessary for genius; genius; genius manifested in different periods; some work experiences and jobs; job path; some of the more important aspects of the idea of the gifted and geniuses; thoughts on the God concept or gods idea; science; theology; some of the tests taken and scores earned (with standard deviations); the range of the scores; social philosophy; economic philosophy; political philosophy; ethical philosophy; worldview-encompassing philosophical system; and meaning in life.

Keywords: Bîrlea Cristian, genius, intelligence, IQ, life, World Genius Directory.

Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: When you were growing up, what were some of the prominent family stories being told over time?

Bîrlea Cristian: As a child, I was very close to my grandfather, whose ideas and stories influenced me as a person in the whole life. He didn’t get to finish the school, he had finished only the middle school, but being a hard worker and due to his fairness, he got to be a very respected man in the society that he lived in.

The war left deep psychological scars on him; I still remember his stories about World War II, he was between the line of life and death many times. Once he got sick of hepatitis due to miserable conditions of the war and he treated himself eating nothing else but tomatoes for a week.

He was a strong man but very kind. Another story that he told me was that once he had to hide in a building that was bombarded for several days, to stay quiet not to be discovered by the enemies, waiting for reinforcements. In the army his job was to transmit information, even when he was old, he knew the Morse code very well and he was good at arithmetic. In the attic of the house, he always had a bag of flour, only the ones that endured those times’ hunger would know why.

Jacobsen: Have these stories helped provide a sense of an extended self or a sense of the family legacy?

Cristian: As the psychologists say, how we live our childhood is very important, many of an adult’s troubles have root in the childhood. I can say that I had a beautiful childhood, both my parents and grandparents were with me in both good and bad times and they supported in everything they could.

I grew up in a simple and humble family, I was never pretentious, I didn’t use to complain a lot and I were very independent with the matters I could, I always tried to solve my own problems alone, without help.

The ideas, stories and role models taken over by me certainly made me the man I am today, both good and bad. Most certainly my subconscious identified my grandfather as a role model; we all try to identify someone as a role model, consciously or unconsciously, for me he was a family man, a distinguished and special person.

Jacobsen: What was the family background, e.g., geography, culture, language, and religion or lack thereof?

Cristian: I was born in 1971, in the northwestern Romania, in Satu Mare. I grew up in a rural area, near the Ukrainian border. I was born in a multiethnic family; the father of my mother was Hungarian, and her mother was Ukrainian. My father’s father was Romanian, an intellectual of those times. You can say a good part of Eastern Europe was combined in my blood, a real ‘cocktail’.

My father was a math teacher and my mother a hairstylist, nowadays my father is no longer with us and my mother retired, I am still very close to her. I’d say my intelligence I inherited from my paternal line, both my father and grandfather were very intelligent people; from my mother I inherited my artistic side that helped me a lot in the work I do.

Jacobsen: How was the experience with peers and schoolmates as a child and an adolescent?

Cristian: I remember with pleasure the school years, I liked going to school to meet new people and socialize with them. Although I’m more introverted, I always enjoyed being with people and I succeeded in overcoming my native shyness.

In high school I had some good friends that we were inseparable; being pretty friendly, I got along with my peers on any occasion. Doing the middle school in a rural area, in my first year of high school I was shocked of the difference between the rural educational system and the urban one. My schoolmates were a lot better educated and prepared than me. I rose above the expectations quickly and I didn’t feel the pressure I felt at the beginning anymore. Romania of those times (1986) had one of the most performant educational systems of the world, especially in STEM.

Jacobsen: What have been some professional certifications, qualifications, and trainings earned by you?

Cristian: Although I was a lazy student, in the last year of high school I stepped up and I was admitted to college. In 1995 I finished my degree in engineering in Timisoara and some years later I enrolled myself for a master’s degree in applied computer science where I finished with the best grade possible, just me and other one student achieved this performance.

The moment I had my hands on my first PC, I couldn’t give it up and I developed my career in IT, in 1997 I funded my company, CLASSOFT, whose manager I still am today. Together with my colleagues we focused on the ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) domain type of apps. Our apps were awarded and recognized by the people, but the biggest achievement we managed to do is succeeding in having a portfolio of stable and satisfied customers.

Jacobsen: What is the purpose of intelligence tests to you, as in individual pursuit of taking a test or few (or more)?

Cristian: I never took very seriously the intelligence tests; they were more like some kind of a game. At college I got to be more competitive, to test and find my limits. I like small ‘competitions’ with my colleagues on IQ forums, there are a lot of great people there, some with incredible intelligence (one of a million or even more rare). These tests have a playful purpose, even though I always use them professionally when I employ new people, they never failed.

Jacobsen: When was high intelligence discovered for you?

Cristian: My first ever intelligence test I did was at the end of college, when I was recruited in the army. There used to be a totalitarian system at the time, the last year of communism in Romania, with some compulsory army time.

Initially I did not know the purpose of the test, there were some lines and signs arranged on a 3v3 matrix, never seen something like that until then, but they were easy to solve, you had to do overlays and rotations on the matrix.

I managed to solve it intuitively, now I know it was some kind of old Raven test. The scores were not shared, but once one of my superiors granted me access to my military files and I saw my score, it was a very good score, higher than a lot of my colleagues’. The score didn’t have a meaning for me, but I felt that officer that let me see my files was behaving different with me; he let me lead different kind of activities, I felt that he trusted me.

Jacobsen: What were some reactions to it, when known and when not known?

Cristian: I saw my life the same as before. At school I wasn’t the nerdy kind of student, I wasn’t the best, but I was pretty good at math and physics. Even though my teacher tried to make me learn more, I always rebelled, the math asked too much supplementary work which I didn’t agree to; being very young it didn’t matter to me, some possible awards that meant nothing to me.

Back then my competitiveness wasn’t present, so I lived my life like any other teenager, I was interested in working out and chasing girls, I had a lot of fun and I don’t regret it. In my opinion the youth should be lived to the fullest, you can never relive this wonderful period of your life. So, returning to the point, I tried to be like any other ordinary teenager and young man, I didn’t know much about intelligence.

Jacobsen: When you think of the ways in which the geniuses of the past have either been mocked, vilified, and condemned if not killed, or praised, flattered, platformed, and revered, what seems like the reason for the extreme reactions to and treatment of geniuses? Many alive today seem camera shy – many, not all.

Cristian: Any system tends to have a state of equilibrium, along our history geniuses perturbed this state of equilibrium with the revolutionary ideas. Instinctively people reject anything that is different, new or what they don’t understand, anything that exceeds their comfort zone; the new is most of the times a factor of stress. Nothing has changed today, but aforetime it was way worse than today. Along history changes were never done in a quick manner, only by spill of blood. Geniuses have always been an anomaly of the system, only one in 30000 has an IQ of 160 (SD 15), therefore statistically an anomaly.

Being a great cinephile, I don’t know if you noticed, but the Hollywood has some part of the blame by the demonization of geniuses, in many movies the scientist is portraited as a villain, with a negative role. The brilliant man has business with the terrorists, with other villains that pay him and at the end of the movie the planet will be saved by a simple, ordinary man, for instance Bruce Willis. The movie industry is a big business, each year it brings a revenue of 40 billion dollars, therefore the standard consumer that pays the ticket wants to see Bruce saving the planet.

We know that in the real life it is different, any time our planet suffered, brilliant scientists came with a solution. I can’t lie that all the geniuses had a positive effect on the planet, some hurt it unwillingly, sometimes they had some pathologies that pushed them to do it.

Back to the movies, unwillingly they influence our subconscious, our opinions, and thoughts. In my opinion there should be more movies that promote positive ideas about gifted people whose ideas led the world forward.

If you don’t believe me, there are a lot of people with high IQ that hide their score like a secret, feeling some kind of shame not to be considered gifted and a fear of being rejected, some of them revealing themselves only in restricted environments with peers like them. If you want to take part of a system you have homogenize with it, the ordinary person has it hard to accept that someone else might be smarter than him.

But the IQ score shouldn’t be a reason to brag about, we all should be humble with each other, it’s better for everyone, especially for you as a genius.

Jacobsen: Who seem like the greatest geniuses in history to you?

Cristian: This question needs several pages for a complete answer, I would nominate the most important genius personalities that succeeded in moving the world forward:

Politics: Caius Julius Caesar Augustus was one of the most important leaders in the history. Augustus succeeded in not becoming a tyrant, the power didn’t corrupt him and worked 42 years in making Rome the most important city in the world.

Science: Isaac Newton, he is the scientist found at the origin of the theories that would revolutionize the science, in the fields of optics, mathematics and especially mechanics.

Philosophy: Aristotle, modern philosophy is based on his methods and principles. His legacy consists in theories related to anything, biology, ethics, logics, politics, poetry, and physics.

Literature: William Shakespeare, a complete writer in poetry, prose, fiction, non-fiction.

Modern physics: Albert Einstein, when we think of geniuses for most of us he is the first one we can think of; he had a very high IQ, gifted with a creativity hard to match even to this day. Together with Archimedes, they are on the list of the greatest mathematicians. Einstein revolutionized every branch of physics.

Inventions: Leonardo da Vinci, it is enough to say about him that he invented the robot precursor and the first working parachute. He almost invented the helicopter; he just needed a motor powerful enough to keep it flying.

Geometry: Archimedes was in the top of the best four mathematicians, but his applications in geometry were the ones that assigned his place in the top. He discovered the fundamental principle of hydrostatics that laid the foundation of hydrostatics in two volumes, Periton ochumenon. About this discovery is cited the famous exclamation “Eureka!” (“I found”, in modern Greek εύρηκα, evrika).

In my youth I used to read a lot about the thoughts of Lao Tzu, the founder of Taoism. In retrospection, I think his ideas influenced a lot of my actions.

Jacobsen: Who seem like the greatest geniuses alive today to you?

Cristian: It’s hard to define what it takes to be the greatest genius. If you narrow it to the IQ score, you will find the answer in the World Genius Directory Geniuses (WGD), in which I take part; but I think most of the geniuses have never taken an IQ test, but with their work they made the world a better place.

I’d nominate Elon Musk for this title though. I don’t know the IQ of Elon Musk, it doesn’t really matter as long as due to his ideas he makes the world a better place.

Jacobsen: What differentiates a genius from a profoundly intelligent person?

In 1983 an American developmental psychologist Howard Gardener described 9 types of intelligence:

Naturalist (nature smart)

Musical (sound smart)

Logical-mathematical (number/reasoning smart)

Existential (life smart)

Interpersonal (people smart)

Bodily-kinesthetic (body smart)

Linguistic (word smart)

Intra-personal (self smart)

Spatial (picture smart)

At many of these types of intelligence, the genius is hard or even impossible to be measured by an IQ test. I consider that the intelligent people who by their creativity they are capable of achieving wonderful things, they earn the title of being a profoundly intelligent person; this is just my opinion, a lot of psychologists or experts of creating IQ test will say that I’m wrong.

Jacobsen: Is profound intelligence necessary for genius?

Cristian: As I said earlier, I consider the notion of genius to be a straight technical one. By some definitions, an IQ score higher than 140 (SD 15) is considered to be corelated to a genius. To express myself more mathematically, the set of profoundly intelligent people are a subset of the set of geniuses, the reciprocal is not always true.

Jacobsen: What traits seem to comprise genius?

Cristian: Stephen Hawking once said: “Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change”. I consider that adaptivity is one of the main traits of an intelligent person; also, other features would be: sensibility, enthusiasm, energy, courage, humor, persuasion, patience, perfectionism, versatility, idealism, sometime laziness…

Jacobsen: How has genius manifested in different periods of history and on different regions, and cultures, of the world in personal opinion?

Cristian: The geniuses showed their presence since the earliest times. Their ideas led to the development of their societies they lived in, not a few times these ideas being considered draconian, the geniuses paid with their lives. Besides the great discoveries without which the today’s society wouldn’t be what it is, the contribution brought to the universal culture was great. The great thinkers created new movements based on which the civilizations rose from more primitive eras. Many of the geniuses that acted in the military theaters of history have changed the course of history by their tactical skills.

Jacobsen: What have been some work experiences and jobs held by you?

Cristian: Since the beginning of my career I worked in the IT domain, one that fit me like a glove. As I wanted to follow my ideas, not others’, in 1997 I founded my company, Classoft, whose manager I still am today. I consider that IT put my creativity to work, it being an ideal job for me.

Jacobsen: Why pursue this particular job path?

Cristian: For me, IT was something natural, nothing forced, I gained many good results and satisfactions from my work. I think that it’s really important to love your job, it’s the only way to have good results. In this line of work, you can find a lot of smart people; also, it is in a permanent state of change, your mind is always used.

Jacobsen: What are some of the more important aspects of the idea of the gifted and geniuses? Those myths that pervade the cultures of the world. What are those myths? What truths dispel them?

Cristian: I find that brilliant people don’t want to be found different socially from the majority of population, they don’t want to be treated and seen as a freak, they have the same feelings, fears and joys as the other people, they want to take part of the society and they are happy if their merits are recognized.

Most of them do things for the society, even though they might seem sometimes selfish, but they dedicate a lot of time studying and they don’t have time left for other interactions; although if someone has the curiosity to pay more attention to their actions, they will find they are kind and involved people.

Unfortunately, a lot of geniuses suffer some kind of high functional autism, Asperger syndrome, therefore they might have different social and adaptation troubles. Asperger syndrome, also called the genius syndrome, would have been diagnosed today to many of famous geniuses like: Albert Einstein, Amadeus Mozart, Sir Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, Thomas Jefferson, Michelangelo, Lewis Carroll, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Stanley Kubrick, James Joyce, Nikola Tesla.

Some scientists consider that autism is some kind of mutation, one necessary in the evolution of humans, the fact that this mutation is getting more frequent today might not be a bad thing, it means that the nature changes the way of us to be, updates us, experimenting on us. For a lot of time, autism has been considered to be a mental retardation.

Jacobsen: Any thoughts on the God concept or gods idea and philosophy, theology, and religion?

Cristian: I’ve read the Bible and I believe in the concept of God, but not the politics made in the name of God, there have been a lot of wars and misery made in his name, the history has a lot of examples for this. I don’t believe God would agree to all these manipulations. I believe that good deeds are made by the people that have a part of God in them. I find myself in the words of Robert G. Ingersoll: “The hands that help are better far than lips that pray”.

Jacobsen: How much does science play into the worldview for you?

Cristian: Being a technical person, an engineer and a programmer, I see the science present everywhere I look. I analyze it often in all the parameters I’ve learned at university. I consider it wrong to become science fundamentalists, we must always find our bond with mother nature.

Unfortunately, a lot of young people don’t experience the primary sensations offered by nature; the virtual world kidnaps their mind more and more.

Jacobsen: How much does theology play into the world for you?

Cristian: I enjoyed reading the history of religions, to understand certain things from history. Being more rational, I couldn’t ignore the many contradictions I’ve found, that to a lot I haven’t found an answer to this day. There is a saying “trust and do not research”, for someone living in the world of numbers it’s impossible to apply to.

I have to admit, I rarely go to the church, also I believe that you can find God in many other places and many other ways. It makes me sad to see how the religious difference can divide people in a radical way.

Jacobsen: What have been some of the tests taken and scores earned (with standard deviations) for you?

Cristian: The highest IQ scores I’ve scored at some famous tests are:

Progressive Matrix Analysis (PMA-32_2E) by Alexi Edin – IQ 163 SD 15

Strict Logic Sequences Examination 1 by Jonathan Wai – IQ 160 SD 15

LSHR Light by Ivan Ivec – IQ 160 SD 15

CFIT32 – Culture-Fair-Test 32 – IQ 160 SD 15

LABCUB and CUBE – ambele de by Hans Sjöberg – IQ 160 SD 15

Numerus Light by Ivan Ivec – IQ 158 SD 15

Jacobsen: What is the range of the scores for you? The scores earned on alternative intelligence tests tend to produce a wide smattering of data points rather than clusters, typically.

Cristian: A good website for IQ tests is iqexams.net, specialists there developed a statistical method to approximate the IQ of a person, they called it Real IQ. Website’s analysts have succeeded in calculating in a professional manner this Real IQ (RIQ) based on thousands of tests done there. Me personally I’ve taken many tests there, after taking 18 tests with a total of 550 questions, my RIQ is 159 SD 15, it’s very close to the result of famous tests.

Jacobsen: What social philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Cristian: I’ve always liked on of Kurt Lewin’s quote: “There is nothing better so practical as good as a theory”. He promoted the idea of applying scientific methods in the fundamental social psychology, but too few social psychologists have applied the method after the dying on Kurt. Most of them tried to develop new theories instead of searching solutions in the real world. It seems in the end, in our days, his method to be the winner one, which is closer to my way of thinking.

Jacobsen: What economic philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Cristian: Being a businessman, I believe in the free market, as long as they are in an equilibrium with fitting social politics. I like the term “perfect competition”, which is a model of economic theory. This model describes a hypothetical market in which no producer or consumer doesn’t have the power to influence market prices. This would lead to an efficient outcome, considering the standard definition of economy.

Jacobsen: What political philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Cristian: I’m not an expert in the matter, but I agree to the fullest with this quote of Franklin D. Roosevelt: “Democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely. The real safeguard of democracy, therefore, is education”.

Jacobsen: What ethical philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Cristian: I’ve always liked Aristotle’s ideas; he promoted an ethical system that could be called virtuous. He believed a person acts according to his virtue. Misery and frustration are caused by mistakes, leading to failed objectives and a weak life. Happiness should be the end goal of our action and this can be obtained by practicing virtue.

Jacobsen: What worldview-encompassing philosophical system makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Cristian: When I was younger, at university’s library I searched for books containing quotes of the great Chinese thinker, Lao Tzu’s, that were filled with wisdom for my mind that was thirsty for new information. Here is one of those quotes, one that will also answer your question:

“Knowing others is intelligence;

knowing yourself is true wisdom.

Mastering others is strength;

mastering yourself is true power.”

― Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

Jacobsen: What provides meaning in life for you?

Cristian: With time passing I’ve changed a lot the way I think about this matter. A while ago I was channeling my ambition towards my own personal development, I worked a lot for my company, my family, my ideas which were sometimes too materialistic. I became more and more competitive, not a bad thing, but sometimes I forgot about other important things that mattered to me; sometimes I lost focus on the special people surrounding me.

I can say that the first wave of pandemic this year brought me something positive, I know that for many people it brought suffering. After many years of work, I had time once again for my own thoughts, for meditation.

Today my meaning of life is the sum of simple things, sometimes trivial, in these quiet weeks I returned to the things I enjoyed in my childhood. I began rediscovering nature, with all my feelings, the pleasure of a summer day, a beautiful day fishing with my wife and kids, I began analyzing deeper the people surrounding me with their needs and wishes. Maybe this pandemic was put in our way with a purpose, a revenge of nature, a break that put us in a slower speed towards our chase to nowhere. I consider that in life the most important thing is to find the state of equilibrium and happiness that we all want.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: November 8, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1) [Online].November 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, November 8). Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, November. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (November 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020):November. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Bîrlea Cristian on Childhood, Philosophy, Test Scores, and Changing Values with Age: Member, World Genius Directory (1)[Internet]. (2020, November 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/cristian-1.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: November 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 3,729

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Gernot Feichter is a Member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: growing up; a sense of an extended self; the family background; the experience with peers and schoolmates; some professional certifications; the purpose of intelligence tests; high intelligence; some reactions; the geniuses of the past; the greatest geniuses in history; the greatest geniuses alive today; a genius from a profoundly intelligent person; profound intelligence necessary for genius; genius; genius manifested in different periods of history; some work experiences and jobs; particular job path; some of the more important aspects of the idea of the gifted and geniuses; thoughts on the God concept; science; theology; tests taken and scores earned (with standard deviations); the range of the scores; social philosophy; economic philosophy; political philosophy; ethical philosophy; worldview-encompassing philosophical system; meaning in life.

Keywords: Gernot Feichter, meaning, Paul Cooijmans, philosophy, World Genius Directory.

Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: When you were growing up, what were some of the prominent family stories being told over time?

Gernot Feichter: My grandfather survived as the sole person of his division in a massacre in Finland during WWII by hiding under a fallen companion. The maneuver was a severe tactical error as the opponent had a good opportunity to defend the attack while risking little. He also froze his toes, became promoted and then, during the final stages of the war, capitulated with his group to the Italian side and was imprisoned. It was after the war, when he produced his offspring. Had he not survived, part of my family branch including myself would not have ever existed.

Also my grandmother had difficult times, she grew up in an orphanage as her mother could not come up with the cost of raising her and was given to a farm as a child and frequently had to work instead of going to school.

Jacobsen: Have these stories helped provide a sense of an extended self or a sense of the family legacy?

Feichter: Indeed, it is the reason that I provide some donations to institutions that are helping others, especially children who obviously possess the lowest means of helping themselves.

Jacobsen: What was the family background, e.g., geography, culture, language, and religion or lack thereof?

Feichter: A classical Austrian background I would say. Two of my grandparents owned a farm, while my other grandfather was working in the wood industry and my grandmother worked as a cleaning lady in a local school. They all stem from small villages in Northern Styria, Austria, where I also grew up. Obviously, their modest background governed their modest personality as well. Besides their apparent modesty, their achievements should also not be underestimated. For example, one of my grandfathers took part in co-founding a local bank which still exists today. Also my other grandfather was part of the communal council and it was quite amusing to read in how articulate ways he complained about things, which he was well known for. Almost all of my grandparents were strictly religious Roman Catholics, except for the community rebel, to whom you may also associate the war story above.

My parents could be described as enrolled sceptics in the same church. While my father almost worked his whole life in the bank that was co-founded by his father, my mother worked for a short period in a shoe production facility, as waiter, maid and most time as housewife and later nursed my grandmother.

Jacobsen: How was the experience with peers and schoolmates as a child and an adolescent?

Feichter: I would describe it as quite ordinary childhood with friendships, also a period with broken or abandoned friendships. But this was during the teenage years, now I feel fine with anyone again. Usually I played a passive role. For example, it was common in my youth to be either a skater or a raver. So I did associate myself to the skaters but I would never come up with such things myself. Also I would usually not ask for others to go out, but I would be asked and say “yes”. I feel like I only had what people would call “a life” because my friends took me with them. My nature would be a meditative or philosophical one and there were too many things to think of, always.

In general school was a more annoying experience for me. Also, I found myself to be insecure and nervous when having to speak in front of a group. I was pretty lucky with my direct school mates, in parallel classes there were some bullies and in some lessons we would be in the same class with them.

While I did not leave out anything to be done as a teenager, I worked towards reducing those ‘lower’ activities to minimum. As an adolescent I followed my intuition to deepen my meditation, living a self-chosen withdrawn life as normal people would call it.

Jacobsen: What have been some professional certifications, qualifications, and training earned by you?

Feichter: I own a bachelor’s degree in Information Management from the University of Applied Sciences in Graz. Through my profession I also did a Java Specialist Mastercourse, Spring and Kubernetes training and a Google Cloud Associate certification.

Jacobsen: What is the purpose of intelligence tests to you, as in individual pursuit of taking a test or few (or more)?

Feichter: Admittedly, when taking the first test I just wanted to show off how smart I am, whatever opportunities this would open for me. However, as my scores were lower than I expected, it was a great teacher of modesty to me. In some sense I am a born megalomaniac testing out his limits which causes people to characterise me as extreme and weird. That being said, I was the highest scorer on “Common Sense” from Patrick Zimmerschied at the time of submission as well as on “Numerix” from Jason Betts. I do not know if those scores were beaten yet.

Knowing my strengths and limits is one of my key takeaway messages from this pursuit.

Jacobsen: When was high intelligence discovered for you?

Feichter: I was able to walk at an extremely early age and was able to get into a sandbox that some less agile children could not even do despite being over a year older. Apart from this early sign, which does not even seem to be that much related to intelligence, nothing was discovered or confirmed till I took those untimed high range iq tests at the age of 24 and later.

Jacobsen: What were some reactions to it, when known and when not known?

Feichter: As indicated, initially I was disappointed by expecting a higher score, but in the long run I am happy with all I have. Apart from my own reactions and this interview request, there were absolutely no external reactions at all. I shall also state that I am not unhappy about that. I would not like it if people treated me differently if they knew I had a high IQ score.

Jacobsen: When you think of the ways in which the geniuses of the past have either been mocked, vilified, and condemned if not killed, or praised, flattered, platformed, and revered, what seems like the reason for the extreme reactions to and treatment of geniuses? Many alive today seem camera shy – many, not all.

Feichter: I think that fear is the main driver behind most conscious aggressions against geniuses. For example, the Roman Catholic Church murdered many geniuses officially for heresy. They obviously did not even follow their own books teachings that one shall not kill but self-invented reasons for such violence. Behind the scenes they might have been afraid that different world views than their own would become popular and therefore their power could be lost. So they set out gruesome signs to prevent others from messing with them. For the less violent mockery of geniuses that might have always happened I also identify fear as root cause. Evolution can be thought of as a competitive process and it is typically not welcomed when a new tough competitor enters the field. Every opportunity will be taken advantage of to diminish the opponent.

Some geniuses seem to prefer stable conditions which they cultivated during their lives. When they were suddenly exposed to the public their life might change drastically and I think those that shy the public would not like this. Also the awareness of the violence aspect discussed earlier might play a role here. There might be a reason why prominent people typically have a crew of bodyguards.

In general however, I feel like most geniuses are grasping for attention and appreciation and only the top guys would achieve that. Furthermore, not even they would gather any mentionable exposure compared to the people that are commonly referred to as stars and might not be geniuses.

Jacobsen: Who seem like the greatest geniuses in history to you?

Feichter: If the miraculous bible stories or that of other ancient scriptures are true and are to be interpreted wordly, then those characters.

Otherwise I would nominate the inventor of the wheel, Tesla, Newton, Einstein and Babbage, but this is silly. I do not like to elevate some and not mention many others that made great contributions. To add, my information is limited and I am not a historian.

Jacobsen: Who seem like the greatest geniuses alive today to you?

Feichter: To clarify, in the previous questions I used the following formula: genius = theoretical brilliance * practical use. In this category there would be too many similar scores today, and no adequate list of truly outstanding persons could be compiled. Many might think now: What, he does not even count this and that person as outstanding? Sry, this is not a list of influential businessmen and I consider the intelligence aspect in their activities too small to stand out.

Hence, for this question I focus on the theoretical brilliance exclusively: I acknowledge Grigori Perelman due to the fact that he was the only person so far who provided an approved solution for one of the Millennium Prize Problems. To solve such a problem that was first elected as being especially hard to crack gained my respect. That being said, I also partook in the insanity of trying such. While I have also published a proof for one of those problems, the P vs NP problem, it is not acknowledged by any authority, at least not yet.

Sorry for the high range iq community, but I will not mention anyone of them here. The reason is simple – I do not have insight to verify the validity of the tests and the answers thereof. The difference of expected scores vs actual scores contributes to a natural distrust. Also, why do I hold a record on test X but am average on test Y. Did not similar leveled persons take both tests?

Jacobsen: What differentiates a genius from a profoundly intelligent person?

Feichter: The definition of genius varies. Generally, the more intelligent a person is, the greater the genius, but there seems to be a consensus that only for IQs higher than ~140-160 the word genius shall be used.

In other definitions, there is also the mention of a manifestation in creative activity. That is why I formulated the equation for genius to include both components in the previous question. Our intelligence evolved in this world we are living, so should not we use it for real world scenarios? In general I prefer this pragmatic definition.

Jacobsen: Is profound intelligence necessary for genius?

Feichter: Yes, per strict definition. On the other hand one could think of art geniuses as lying outside of the definition of regular geniuses and for them intelligence might not be as relevant.

Jacobsen: What traits seem to comprise genius?

Feichter: Flexible, curious, open, self-sufficient, controlled, sensitive, passionate, perfectionistic, dissatisfied, restless, focused and humorous.

Jacobsen: How has genius manifested in different periods of history and on different regions, and cultures, of the world in personal opinion?

Feichter: I think that at the moment when geniuses manifest in a civilisation, this is indicative of a high level of development. The output of such ripe civilisations can be seen in all aspects of human living, like buildings, art, science and technology. Ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome are famous examples thereof. On the other hand we also see much later civilisations which are not famous for a high grade of development. It seems that only if conditions are right, high advancements are possible.

Jacobsen: What have been some work experiences and jobs held by you?

Feichter: Apart from some “primitive” short-term jobs as a student, I spent the majority of my professional life in a major technology consulting company. I worked there till the current moment as a Software Developer, Cloud-, DevOps- and Automation-Engineer. As you can see, there are many fancy words in IT describing quite similar things.

Jacobsen: Why pursue this particular job path?

Feichter: My interest in software programming arose in my youth when my father bought the first PC. I was curious how this stuff would work behind the scenes, hence I even studied in this field. In this industry, there is no rest. New technologies, frameworks and methodologies are popping out every day, the only constant is change. This is a perfect environment to keep being challenged. To add, I work with people that are similar freaks like myself.

Jacobsen: What are some of the more important aspects of the idea of the gifted and geniuses? Those myths that pervade the cultures of the world. What are those myths? What truths dispel them?

Feichter: The main myth which I am aware of is that geniuses must skip grades in school and be high academics. Rick Rosner even seems having taken much longer in high school by choice. My personal story to this topic is the following: As soon as I entered school after kindergarten and handed in my daily voluntary extra task that my teacher announced would provide extra points, I noticed she started rolling her eyes. From this reaction I concluded that my extra ambition is not appreciated and I turned down my scholastic efforts to a minimum. I hardly learned anything extra outside the school lessons, even for exams, and I did only the required homework which I admittedly sometimes even copied. Nevertheless, the higher the education, the harder it was to get through, so in university I actually had to put in some effort and I was actually quite motivated as some subjects were really interesting to me. While my grades were always mediocre I could even finish my studies with distinction, something that was unheard of both for me and my peers.

There existed a great number of autodidactic geniuses in the past and today many geniuses work in jobs that are way below their ability level.

Jacobsen: Any thoughts on the God concept or gods idea and philosophy, theology, and religion?

Feichter: In my quest of truth seeking throughout life I stumbled across Walter Russel’s idea that a god could not create something better than himself. Well, how could one be more mighty than an almighty one? Also, he could not create something less than himself, as then his creation would not stand up to his standards. I find this reasonable and therefore truly believe in a higher form of existence, god if you will. We are incomplete beings striving for completeness, so to speak.

After all, if what is currently known by the general population was everything there is, then I would see no purpose in life, missing an opportunity for individual advancement.

If Russel’s perception is true, it could be ridiculed that people are afraid of artificial intelligence becoming a threat to humanity as this would imply that they believe they could create something more intelligent or powerful than themselves at a given moment, which would be impossible.

Jacobsen: How much does science play into the worldview for you?

Feichter: The scientific method was an important invention by one of my favourite geniuses to advance human population counts and the quality of lives drastically and quickly. It fulfilled its purpose already. To complete the quest of further human advancement I believe that a different kind of science will need to re-appear and become popular again.

Jacobsen: How much does theology play into the world for you?

Feichter: On one hand theological content is a great inspiration, but my rational mind focuses on what can currently be verified empirically. Nevertheless, as Godel’s incompleteness theorem shows that logical reasoning has its own limits, we might need different methods to advance further.

After all, thinking is only one aspect of the mind, feeling the other. Do you agree that we can describe any of your life’s situations with those two aspects? Swedenborgs book titled “Divine Love and Wisdom”, the highest form of feeling and thinking so to speak, might cover those aspects not by accident.

I agree with another spiritual scripture, but unfortunately I lost the source that stated that it was planned that only a distant memory of gods shall exist. That is exactly how I perceive theology: distant but inspiring.

Also I think that most spiritual texts are somewhat obfuscated and to be read in a certain way to be understood. The difficulty of breaking the code might be part of the game.

I mix theology, spiritualism and philosophy maybe a little too much here but essentially I consider those topics not too far apart.

Jacobsen: What have been some of the tests taken and scores earned (with standard deviations) for you?

Feichter: All of my test scores have a standard deviation of 15:

Common Sense by Patrick Zimmerschied: 163
World Intelligence Test by Jason Betts: 163
The Alchemist Test by Paul Cooijmans: 162
Einplex by Ivan Ivec: 162
Lux25 by Jason Betts: 157
Reason Behind Multiple-Choice by Paul Cooijmans: 155
Mathema by Jason Betts: 154
World I.Q. Challenge by Brennan Martin: 154
Asterix by Jason Betts: 153
Cartoons of Shock by Paul Cooijmans: 152
LSHR Light by Ivan Ivec: 149
Numerus Light by Ivan Ivec: 148,5
Test For Genius – Revision 2016 – Numerical and Spatial sections by Paul Cooijmans: 148
Test of the Beheaded Man by Paul Cooijmans: 143
Triplex Light by Ivan Ivec: 133

Jacobsen: What is the range of the scores for you? The scores earned on alternative intelligence tests tend to produce a wide scattering of data points rather than clusters, typically.
Feichter:
My test results range from 133 to 163, that is 30 IQ points or two standard deviations. As you indicated, quite a lot.

Jacobsen: What social philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Feichter: I like the theory of justice by John Rawls which proposes that fair social systems could be designed if one would not know which role in that society one would have to play. Aside, I speculate that the free market achieves the same goal through supply and demand.

Jacobsen: What economic philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Feichter: As indicated previously, I appreciate the free market theory by Adam Smith. Generally, I consider the economy too dynamic to be regulated by static systems, such that dynamic auto-regulating mechanisms may outperform those. Conversely, I believe that the free market is what happens naturally over the long run, so the free market theory merely describes the underlying phenomenon.

Despite that, I think that the role of the economy is to fulfill the material requirements of a population and the current systems of maybe not entirely free, but largely, free markets are functioning fine. It may suffer some hic-ups from time to time, but this seems to be part of any complex system, including humans, for example.

Jacobsen: What political philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Feichter: As I believe that humans basically strive for higher levels of freedom, I think that politics role is to allow the fulfillment of this urge for the reigned population as fair as possible. Isaiah Berlin’s idea of negative and especially positive liberty may cover this concept best. I view negative liberty, like Charles Taylor, as enabler for positive liberty.

Besides this political quackery and finger pointing that starts as soon as even a minor issue pops up, I would urge people to look into themselves first. Oftentimes, the real culprit may sit closer than even the closest neighbour.

Jacobsen: What ethical philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Feichter: Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s idea that morality is an innate, un-learned human attribute, seems reasonable to me. I guess we all know the feeling when we broke our own ethical standards. The regrets and ruminations that come up when having done so. Hence, even the punishment mechanism seems to be innate.

One might argue that the world is too bad and this shows that morality is not innate. I would disagree in a sense that we have the – at least perceivably – freedom of will to act in line with or against our own morals.

Typically, I would argue, the more painful the outcome of a decision would be for ourselves vs others, the higher the likelihood that we decide in a way to shift our pain to someone else, if the opportunity is given, and thereby we break our moral rules. Therefore, to be the most ethical being, ultimate self-sacrifice might be required.

Ethics in general seems like one of the highest virtues to me. At least it seems to be operating significantly above the animalistic and survival mode.

Jacobsen: What worldview-encompassing philosophical system makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Feichter: This answer requires a little debauchery.

Intuitively I thought that philosophy or rationality is the way to explain the world. But I came to the conclusion that there is some crux here. For example, it would be most rational for me if nothing had ever been and nothing would ever be. But the very fact that I am typing here contradicts this rationality. Also I noticed that many questions boil down to the big unanswered questions, like “What is the purpose of life?” and furthermore I want to remind that I stumbled across Godel’s incompleteness theorem. Essentially I came to the same conclusion like Socrates or Goethe characterized as Faust: “I know that I do not know anything”. This rational shock essentially leaves the important questions open and tells that they seem to be impossibly solved by thinking.

I forcefully conclude that if I do not know or cannot know some things from my limited perspective, a wiser entity must have set up this world and eventually knows everything better. A fallback from rationality to feeling mode so to speak. Your heartbeat surely does not depend on my rational insight thereof and still it seems to be working fine. This natural trust is calming and leads me to answer your question with: Theism. A more detailed elaboration on my view on Theism is already provided in my answer regarding theology.

Jacobsen: What provides meaning in life for you?

Feichter: To find truth, for I believe only the truth shall set us free.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: November 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1) [Online].November 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, November 1). Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, November. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (November 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020):November. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Gernot Feichter on Background and Qualifications, Geniuses and Intelligence, Science and Theology, and Meaning in Life: Member, World Genius Directory (1)[Internet]. (2020, November 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/feichter-1.

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Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: November 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 6,383

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Benjamin Li is a Member of the International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (ISPE). He discusses: “STEM jobs, chess grandmasters, professional eSports, and music composing”; high IQ individuals will do exceptionally poorly in tasks; core flavours of a city conducive to the flourishing of “outliers and outsiders”; other influences on city culture from Chinese culture; the feeling in the separation from the “international Chinese students”; the programming work alongside academic research; and the “fear of failure.”

Keywords: Benjamin Li, esports, fear, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry, IQ STEM.

Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What examples come to mind in “STEM jobs, chess grandmasters, professional eSports, and music composing”?

Benjamin Li[1],[2]*: I mentioned some of these fields because some people with the highest cognitive ability exist in these domains. In some cases, the cognitive ability plus dedication required to reach the absolute top is pretty insane.

STEM refers to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. You don’t need extreme ability, of course, but most of these jobs are filled with individuals who are solely above average in IQ and mostly above the 80th percentile. Computer programmers, engineers, mathematicians, professors are all professional and well-respected jobs. It is already well known that Nobel Prize winners, particularly in physics, have extremely high IQs. The mathematical talent required to win a Fields Medal for mathematics is likely unmeasurable at the moment.

Chess and eSports would be making a career out of mental sports. Some examples of people who make a living of chess are Magnus Carlsen and Garry Kasparov. Some who make it from the video game I specifically play is MkLeo (Leonardo Lopez) – a Mexican professional Smash Ultimate whom I have high regard for. Another player that caught my eye was Hungrybox, a player who has been able to be the best in Super Smash. Bros Melee while juggling an engineering degree and engineering job later on. If I recall correctly, Garry Kasparov was measured with an IQ of 135 using the WAIS, with his working memory as one of the highest, which is expected of a game that requires use of chunks to categorise chess positions. Judit Polgar, Magnus Carlsen and Garry Kasparov were estimated or “reported” to have IQs of over 170, but I wish everyone knew that those figures were fake. For example, how was Judit Polgar’s IQ of 170 reported? Only hobby high-range tests have a ceiling higher than 160, and the name of test and standard deviation is not mentioned. Adult IQ scores are more reliable than childhood scores also. Garry Kasparov was estimated 190, but tested at 135. I am not always impressed with the IQ of mental athletes, but key aspects of performance long term relate more so to their mental fortitude, mental power and stamina, and specific cognitive abilities.

I am unsure what the IQ of professional gamers is (it depends on the type of game as different games will have different g-loadings and test different aspects of cognition), but I would guess most of them are between 115-140, with most of them having specific cognitive skills well above the 99th percentile. A select few professionals could actually also be at the highest, realistic IQ measurement of 160 sd 15. Unlike chess, many video games require fast reactions to perform at the highest level. IQ only helps an individual learn faster generally, but once you are at a high level, I’d assume IQ and performance is weakly correlated. A lack of IQ may not prevent you from learning chess or any video game, but a lack of cognitive ability (such as memory or reaction time) will certainly limit many players from advancing to the next level. It is also important to note that hand dexterity is not what is happening, because all hand motions are reliant on our brains. Video games are excellent tools to test for mental functioning. IQ is likely important here in general as most people typically have to balance regular life, alongside other activities, and so very few people take the risk to drop out of school just to devote fully to chess or esports. Both however, require the mental stamina to sit in front of a chess board, or screen constantly for long periods of time, and perhaps for an entire day. It typically takes a lot of cognitive ability and dedication to be just “good” at one of these things. I can’t imagine the intelligence, cognitive ability, mental fortitude, and grit required to manage top-level performance in more than one of these domains at the same time, or throughout life. What I mean is, the amount of mental resilience and power to spend hours competing in any of these activities, go home mentally and physically drained, and then have to work on STEM related subjects at a difficult university, or manage a difficult job on the weekdays after competing for an entire weekend, almost unfathomable to most people. I should also mention that it is a lot more impressive to reach high levels through self-learning rather than coaching. Indeed, most child prodigies who reach high levels do get extensive coaching from parents and professionals, but a true “genius” in these non-scientific fields would have been able to reach a high level by themselves through one’s own motivation to try new things.

For video game performance, there are two articles I have read in peer-reviewed journals. Many video games act as useful resources to test an individual’s learning ability. A low IQ will not necessarily prevent anyone from becoming good at a game, mainly if one devotes their entire life to a particular domain.

1) Can we reliably measure the general factor of intelligence (g) through commercial video games? Yes, we can! Intelligence, Volume 53, November-December 2015, Pages 1-7 M.Angeles Quiroga, Sergio Escorial, Francisco J.Roman, Daniel Morillo, Andrea Jarabo, Jesus Privado, Miguel Hernandez, Borja Gallego, Roberto Colom.

– “Video games and intelligence tests measure the same high-order latent factor.”

2) Intelligence and video games: Beyond “brain games.” Intelligence, Volume 75, July-August 2019, Pages 85-94 M.A.Quiroga, A.Diaz, F.J.Roman, J.Privado, R.Colom. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intell.2019.05.001

– “Gaming performance was correlated with standard measures of fluid reasoning, visuospatial ability, and processing speed. Results revealed a correlation value of 0.79 between latent factors representing general intelligence (g) and video games general performance (gVG). This find leads to conclude that: (1) performance intelligence tests and video games is supported by shared cognitive processes and (2) brain-games are not the only genre able to produce performance measures comparable to intelligence standardized tests.”

3) The effects of video game playing on attention, memory, and executive control. Acta Psychologica, Volume 129, November 2008, Pages 387-398. Walter R.Boot, Arthur F.Kramer, Daniel J.Simons, Monica Fabiani, Gabriele Gratton. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2008.09.005

– “Expert gamers and non-gamers differed on a number of basic cognitive skills: experts could track objects moving at greater speeds, better detected changes to objects stored in visual short-term memory, switched more quickly from one task to another, and mentally rotated objects more efficiently”

(Image taken from source #2)

Jacobsen: What are some examples in which “many high IQ individuals will do exceptionally poorly in tasks that correlate poorly with general intelligence”?

Li: Perhaps this is not representative of all high IQ individuals, but only those high IQ individuals with apparent idiosyncrasies such as myself. I should say that I likely exhibit Asperger syndrome. Aspergers, or other mental disorders, even more than IQ, may cause isolation and make one feel different from others. In a task that does not correlate at all, or correlates very little with intelligence, that means virtually everyone should be performing at a certain level. Perhaps those tasks are just too dull and repetitive for individuals who are outliers. Einstein’s proficiency and talents would have shown in a challenging field, such as physics, but he probably wouldn’t be famous for driving a car or making food. More so, as I said previously, I think in a culture obsessed with money and sex, high intelligence can be quite oddly shaped and combining that with a mental disorder such as Asperger’s, there is no doubt that individuals will have it quite rough in society. My Muslim friend from competitive gaming commented on how I looked like I had a lot of trouble figuring out how to hold a Shawarma (Middle Eastern Cuisine). Indeed, many times average individuals will wonder if I am mentally retarded, because I am not performing basic tasks usually. Doing complicated tasks makes people believe you are intelligent, and failing to perform basic functions at some level will make people think you’re disabled. It seems like I resembled both descriptions, so one of my friends once suggested I was a savant type individual with specific extreme cognitive talents only. He was joking but I did not see that at the time.

Jacobsen: What else seem like core flavours of a city conducive to the flourishing of “outliers and outsiders” who would “have ample opportunities to fit in and expand their intelligence and perhaps even creativity”?

Li: I think society needs to allow everyone to pursue their interests, which would allow everything to happen naturally. A fair community that provides equality of opportunity allows everyone to flourish the best way they possibly can and pursue what they enjoy and excel best in and reach the highest level each person possibly can. I hope parents, peers, and teachers can respect all children for who they are and help them achieve whatever goal they have in life. I don’t enjoy seeing parents force their children into situations they feel like they don’t belong. Some parents take nurture way too far, and I think that could certainly negatively impact many children’s mental development. 

Jacobsen: What are some other influences on city culture from Chinese culture?
Also, what facets of “style, food, and language” seem particularly influential?

Li: I think society needs to allow everyone to pursue their interests, which would allow everything to happen naturally. A fair community that provides equality of opportunity allows everyone to flourish the best way they possibly can and pursue what they enjoy and excel best in and reach the highest level each person possibly can. I hope parents, peers, and teachers can respect all children for who they are and help them achieve whatever goal they have in life. I don’t enjoy seeing parents force their children into situations they feel like they don’t belong. Some parents take nurture way too far, and I think that could certainly negatively impact many children’s mental development. 

Jacobsen: What is the feeling in the separation from the “international Chinese students”?

Li: Nothing much. I don’t even consider my ethnicity as a noteworthy part of my identity or extended self. It doesn’t matter which culture, ethnic group, or country I was born into. I merely view myself as an outlier and outsider, no matter where I go. For many people, perhaps their ethnic heritage/culture/religion plays a considerable part in their metaphorical sense of self, but it never did for me even if I tried. Of course, so many problems arose for me because I never fit in, and had virtually no identity other than a couple of labels.

Jacobsen: Could you combine the programming work alongside academic research? Have you, especially if thinking of the long-term?

Li: Yes, that would be best. Academic research + programming skills are way too useful. I always forget how important programming skills are to the fields I intend to graduate with. I should focus on programming jobs solely to be honest. I did well in my first year of University, but I did not take my Computer Science classes seriously (was my lowest grade). It’s a long story of how my academic interests developed, and how I realized I should go back to my original intended career since I entered University.

I found programming work to be quite dull for me, and my parents tried to get me to do it, but I never recognized the motivation to learn it myself mostly. However, recently I believe that maybe it was the right career for me after all, rather than focusing on academic research at this time. Truthfully, I took my scientific interests too seriously, and fell behind my classmates in skills relating to programming (Java, C++, and R). I may be the worst among all my classmates at the moment because I never took these things seriously and wished I could avoid it, but since I decided to major in statistics and mathematics (though now I wish I was in the more prestigious/popular major Computer Science), I should take programming seriously, and forget about academic research. Recently, I haven’t had interest anymore in science as much ever since I realized it was affecting my current education. I may just give up on a career in science and focus on computer programming solely, which is what my parents intended I should study, and now I somehow think I am making the right choices. The truth is, I never really had the heart to spend over 10 years in the educational system but somehow my motivation to become a “genius” and to make contributions to various fields kept me going, even though now it holds no weight anymore ever since I decided to most past these labels. I think entering the workforce immediately after graduation will be great, and plus I’d have a lot more free time to pursue my other passions more seriously since there is a lot more free time once you work, as compared to being a university student. I will speak more on my academic choices and history later (really has been insane for me), but I think I’m making the right choice by focusing more on my current education, more than anything else. Long term, I’d hope I have a decent career, fall in love, pass on my genes, raise my kids to be happy adults, and live a happy life myself. I don’t need to change the world or reach the top of any career, nor am I obligated to, no matter my intelligence level.

Jacobsen: Why the “fear of failure” in a moment of life in which true challenge and competition of talents come forward?

Li: I do not fear failure anymore, but this was a thing of the past. My insecurities alongside Chinese cultural attitudes made me feel like an underachiever. Even though I was brilliant, I was never perceived as the absolute brightest or praised for my achievements. My “underachievement” is all about me failing to be validated for so many of my achievements in multiple domains by parents, peers, and teachers. Because of this, I decided my achievements were nothing much and that I’d have to do much better. I mean getting into MIT instead of a top 40 school worldwide such as UBC, being a national level tennis player instead of a provincial level player, being the best in Canada in a video game instead of being in the top 15-20 in terms of skill. These things led to my entitlement and arrogance that I’d only be able to prove my genius-level intelligence if I currently was studying computer science at MIT with an A average while having achieved the national level title in tennis and chess, #1 in Canada in Smash, and while self-learning academic subjects, all at the same time or at least held by competence throughout life. This is truly impossible for anybody unless they had excellent support and resources, in addition to outrageous amounts of intelligence, specific abilities, dedication, mental fortitude, and more. I did believe in my ability to do this, but perhaps this was based on overconfidence and an overestimation of my abilities. I always felt like I haven’t achieved enough for no reason, and of course, I realize now I was wrong to be insecure. I realized that there are people more talented than I am, who may not have gotten the chance at all, and that I should not feel entitlement.

I was afraid of failing to meet the expectations of my parents in the past, but this hasn’t affected me at all in the past year. I was never, indeed, a failure. Most people would envy my achievements. However, I was only taught that education was the only important thing all my life, so all my other successes mean nothing. With this type of mindset alone, my estimated IQ correlated with an individual holding an IQ level of 125 (1 in 20 rarity). Besides, I saw myself as very little in the educational system because, in a group of 30 AP students, or gifted students, I wouldn’t have been identified by teachers as being near the top of a more selective group, but near the bottom. My underachievement would be failing to attend an Ivy League school. Of course, after high school, I could not achieve that because I never cared about attending prestigious universities, let alone deciding what to study. My condescending attitude near the end of high school made me believe that only the super-elite professions like medicine or law, or the most elite schools such as MIT or Harvard or Stanford, were worth it for me, nothing else.

If you watched a part of the Ivy Dreams documentary I had linked, my attitude was sort of similar to this one girl. Had I been brought up in her city and applied to the Ivy Leagues, I would have gotten rejected. Even with perfect SAT or ACT scores, and good grades, I would have failed the interview miserably and would have written a terrible arrogant essay. In the documentary, Sophie’s dad was always pressuring her. In her interview, her attitude was arrogant, as she was talking about how her high school was too easy for her and how Upenn would challenge her, thinking she was way smarter than everyone else perhaps. She got rejected from the Ivy Leagues and then got accepted to Washington and Lee University. Still, after she finished reading her acceptance letter out loud with a sad attitude, she threw the paper to the ground, with no respect for it at all because it wasn’t an Ivy League school. She had been told her whole life that getting into an Ivy League school was her only goal and since she had failed that, she felt worthless. I feel bad about her “failure,” but there is no doubt she deserved it. However, she has completed a master’s at Johns Hopkins in East Asian studies and is now working as a teacher. The other three individuals in the documentary are also doing quite well from what I have heard.

Throughout most of my life, I didn’t believe my intelligence was comparable to that of a “genius” or anything, so I didn’t think it was likely for me to be a highly successful scientist and win a Nobel Prize in Physics. However, I wanted to be one of the best in specific domains and win a Nobel prize or Fields Medal in mathematics if I were even to care in the first place. I think I took some security in the fact that I seemed to be a lot “dumber” (by academic standards only) than most of the overachieving Chinese and Indian students who would study all day. Later, I had assumed the students in advanced placement classes in high school were probably all somewhat brighter than I was. And so I was progressing through school where I wasn’t perceived to be as bright by parents, peers, and teachers. Perhaps my teachers and peers thought I was bright near the end, even though I didn’t feel it. So I would think that if I had to take any test of my academic aptitude, I wouldn’t do poorly, but certainly not exceptionally well. I couldn’t see myself being at the 1 in 1000 level, based on how others viewed me. I was more so someone who was considered “smart” but not anything extreme if you only knew I was studying a STEM degree at the University of British Columbia. I probably saw myself as someone with around a 125-135 IQ, even though 1 in 100 level seemed to be pushing it a bit, relative to the 500 students in my high school graduating class (the average IQ is around 108 however, not 100, due to selective immigration from China and India in particular).

I decided to take standardized tests, but truthfully, at some point, I contemplated dropping out of university since I was having so much trouble figuring out what to study, and I had already failed my parent’s expectations to major in computer science, even though later they were cool with statistics and mathematics. It was all thanks to my interests in science and my incredibly high standardized and intelligence test scores that kept me going in this boring educational system. My aptitude needed to be much higher than everyone else’s if I was going to succeed because my work ethic and personality were all well below average (maybe the worst in the school?) regarding how it can help me succeed academically. I had taken the GRE and LSAT, for example, and was confident due to perfect SAT and ACT scores, and I ended up getting near-perfect scores on both the LSAT and the GRE. Even for a verbal reasoning test, which is lower than my spatial and mathematical aptitude, I reached the 99.9th percentile among test takers, which would be above the 99.9th percentile for the general population. My math scores were always higher on standardized tests in childhood, leading up to now. Still, I think reading a lot of books, and papers from scientific journals, in addition to taking my philosophy and English courses seriously, definitely got me in the right position to score high on verbal problems. My supervised test score (WAIS-IV) administered by a psychologist, was not a perfect score, but it was near the ceiling of the test (160 sd 15). Still, it is questionable how meaningful even a perfect score would be since high scores are less reliable. Later I got into hobby high-range tests, which are experimental, and easily scored in the 160s without much time commitment. I have taken a few numerical and one verbal reasoning test only, where my score on a pure verbal test for the first time was 154 SD 15, whereas my score on a pure numerical test was 166. I am currently taking a test by Paul Cooijmans, which is mixed with spatial, verbal, and numerical items, but I haven’t had the time to finish at all. I should be scoring between 150-160, but I wonder if I can reach the absolute top scorers (185+) with much more effort. Regardless, I don’t consider hobby tests accurate as I still believe 160 is the highest IQ we have confidence measuring regarding professional IQ tests. When you score higher than another person on a battery of high-range hobby tests, it means you are probably smarter because it’s hard to make a test that doesn’t test for intelligence. Still, I question the validity of high-range tests since they do not have large sample sizes. What I mean is, it doesn’t matter if you score 80 or 180; it only matters how you score relative to other intelligent people. I found pleasure from scoring higher than 160 and wanted to believe those tests could accurately measure above 160, but even someone like Rick Rosner, who consistently scores in the 190s, does not have an actual IQ of 192 (1 in 2 billion). His true IQ (g) is likely to be around 160-170, as his initial scores on high-end tests were in the 170s apparently. I don’t have time to waste on tests for now, but I did enjoy picking up high-range tests as a hobby since the pandemic prevented me from participating in my other hobbies for the most part. If I ever score in the 180s or 190s, I do not want to be known for having a “190 IQ” or “world’s highest IQ.” I want to be known as an individual who dispels IQ myths, particularly celebrity IQ scores, self-reported IQs of snobs, flawed comparisons of children to Einstein (he never took an IQ test), and different scales leading to inflation of IQ numbers. I also want to educate the general public and the high IQ community on IQ-related topics since they are mostly not taught in schools for various reasons. From my conversations with many people, they are clueless about such an important phenomenon. Lastly, suppose I participate in intelligence research. In that case, I want to be known for my confidence (not arrogance) regarding the environmentalist position on why human groups differ on average in intelligence test scores.

Ever since I learned that my “true IQ” or general intelligence (all IQ scores serve as a proxy for g) is almost sure to be near or possibly above the currently highest realistic measurement of 160 (SD=15) or 164 SD = 16 or 196 SD = 24, I realized that I didn’t need IQ tests to confirm my intelligence. There were so many things in my life that indicated my outlier high intelligence, but I had to confirm it because of my insecurity due to never being viewed as the brightest, or didn’t feel validation for my achievements, and my “underachievement” because I didn’t think going to a school like UBC was all that great. I take it all back now, and I am grateful for everything that happened to me. Let me rant a bit, and I apologize for my overt narcissism in any of this, but maybe it’s best to see my thought process.

I was interested in the idea of “overall intellectual production throughout life” as a reasonable estimate of someone’s general intelligence. Most people judge others based on their education, grades, occupation, and income, which all have correlations between .4-.6 with IQ scores; however, no single factor cannot tell you the full story of any individual. Because achievement is never close to perfect, I hypothesized that looking at other variables would make it more accurate to estimate someone’s IQ, which would allow high IQ “underachievers” such as myself to feel good about myself. I suppose this is a way to cope with my “underachievement” and with the fact that I’m not studying at MIT in a STEM field (average IQ of STEM students at MIT is likely around 140) with a 4.0 GPA. I wanted to theorize how I may create a formula to estimate someone’s overall intellectual prowess from everything that occurs in an individual’s life (educational and occupational achievement, activities throughout life, and how far they have reached in these events). Being a national level chess player, while being a university graduate, would be more of an achievement overall than someone with just a university degree. This will be entirely subjective, but if anything, it is based on the best estimate of the average IQ of individuals in a particular activity who have achieved at a certain level. For example, the average math Ph.D. graduate has an IQ around 140, but at an elite university, it is perhaps 145-150. Still, those who can juggle a strenuous activity throughout life at a high level would likely be higher than 150. In contrast, an average performer as a math Ph.D. graduate, while having nothing else, would be estimated to be 140-145. There are a lot of students who only have their educational achievements and nothing else. Since we know that individuals with higher IQs tend to have a more significant number of interests and skills (held by competence), those with unique talents (in anything, but some things deserve more “points”) are mostly all above 145 (among math PhDs) I’d argue. It is almost worth noting that it depends on the activity as well. STEM students tend to engage in more complex activities. What I mean is that business and life science students tend to have much more impressive CV’s but are far less likely to take on intellectual domains such as the ones I have mentioned (video games, music, chess, and the like) and reach high levels, or hold these things throughout life through competence. I consider most types of work and volunteering only slightly relevant in my hypothetical formula. Even though they take time, you can not rank people by how well they volunteer. Success as a volunteer isn’t likely to depend on intelligence (though there could be exceptions). Even if an individual was objectively in the top 1% of volunteers in terms of skill, it is not much an intellectual achievement given that it is unlikely to correlate positively with IQ, unlike in an intellectual domain such as chess, and because most people do not hold “volunteering” or managing some club throughout their life.

If educational achievement (years of study, grades, the difficulty of major, rank of institution) had a perfect correlation with educational achievement as defined here, my achievement would have been around the 1 in 100 level. Let’s assume IQ scores are irrelevant, and no one can claim any IQ, so all you had to do was guess someone’s IQ based on their accomplishments. My IQ predicted by a least-squares prediction would have been 135, but since the correlation is not perfect, the average IQ of STEM students at UBC is around 125. In reality, I’m an above-average student, but certainly not at the absolute top of my class, but let’s assume you only knew I was a student at UBC in a STEM field, and that, therefore, would correlate with an IQ of 125. However, whether you judge me to be above average, average, or below average depends on other aspects of my life. If you look at other aspects of my life alongside my education (autodidactism, self-learning a sport and reaching a provincial level (held by competence), national-level eSports athlete (held by competence), and many smaller achievements not held anymore, then I would not be an “underachiever.” Also, I had no little support and resources, except my education was provided for me, and I somehow managed to do everything. If this sounds stupid and selfish, please go ahead and laugh. Still, even though this hypothetical formula was only based on my insecurities and lack of validated achievement, I think this formula could be useful someday if formed.

What made me stand out relative to my peers was not only my exceptional intelligence or level of condescendence but my breadth of intellectual achievements throughout life and determination to be the best in everything I touched, despite lack of support and resources. Even though from validated or semi-validated IQ tests, my true IQ (psychometric g), would have been estimated to be near or above the current highest realistic ceiling of 160 SD=15, I wanted to be prideful of my achievements rather than my ability, as if my achievements did not reflect my 1 in 10,000 (or maybe rarer) level of intelligence, I wouldn’t have felt accomplished. A very high IQ score itself won’t impress anybody, but combined with exceptional achievement, it proves that ability without a reasonable doubt, beyond any imposter syndrome I may have suffered. I never wanted to rely on IQ scores to prove my intelligence, but they did serve as a confirmation, after all my insecurities. Let’s say my true IQ is 160 (1 in 30,000 rarity), then what kind of achievement would I have been satisfied with? If the average IQ of UBC STEM students is 125, and the average IQ of top 10 players in a province in a video game is also around 125, then someone who can juggle both, maybe certainly above 140 given that both activities require a lot of mental ability and correlate with IQ reasonably well, but juggling both throughout life is a bit insane. As far as I’m aware, an individual with a STEM Ph.D. and while being a national level ranked player, has been unheard of in the competitive eSports community, and because the average IQ of STEM Ph.D. graduates on average is 140, and at elite universities even higher still, someone who can juggle all of that, with top-level performance in eSports, would equate to achievement at the 1 in 200 million level, which would be satisfying for someone with an IQ of 160 (1 in 30,000). Considering that I am holding some other skills such as autodidacticism and tennis intact, all of these combined would have satisfied my need for achievement, or “genius-level accomplishment.” If someone had Garry Kasparov’s level of chess skill, while at the same time being a math professor at a top 12 university, this would be by itself and including no other achievements, already capable of being called the highest intellectual achiever in the world from my hypothetical formula. It could be arguably greater as a “genius-level accomplishment” than the true geniuses such as Darwin and Einstein, but this is subjective. Let’s assume winning a Nobel Prize in physics is a 1 in 5 million intellectual achievement (an IQ of 176 is around 1 in 5 million level). Of course, the question is, what mix of intellectual achievements would be equivalent to winning a Nobel Prize by itself and no other achievement? If winning a Nobel Prize in Physics is 1 in 5 million achievement by itself with no other achievements, according to my formula, and assuming a correlation of .75 with general intelligence, then the average Nobel Laureate in physics would be 76 x 0.75 + 100= 157 IQ! I was quite obsessed with this question of what type of intellectual accomplishment combined throughout life could be viewed as more impressive than what a Nobel Laureate in Physics has achieved by itself. Suppose some people estimate Garry Kasparov’s IQ at 190 (which is false). In that case, it is unfathomable to imagine who can achieve and maintain world-class level chess skills and achievement throughout life while being just an average mathematician at an elite university. This achievement could be said to be at the 1 in 5 million level (just a guess), which would regress to an IQ of 157 again. An individual capable of having an accomplishment at the 1 in 20 million level, and predicted IQ at the 1 in 100,000 level (on average), would certainly be a “genius” and have other genius-level characteristics such as extreme productivity, grit, creativity, and dedication. So, in this case, I would argue this hypothetical individual with professional level chess skill and achievement held throughout life, while being a math professor at a top 12 university, is an achievement equivalent to winning a Nobel Prize in physics based on my hypothetical formula (though subjective). Hou Yifan, a Chinese Chess grandmaster, serves as an example here, as she was able to be the best female chess player while juggling an international relations degree at Peking University, and then ended up being a professor at the School of Physical Education of Shenzhen University’s Faculty of Education. Her level of achievements likely indicates an IQ of over 145, whereas if she only had one of these achievements alone, she may be estimated to be 135 instead. I cannot begin to imagine the amount of intelligence, cognition, grit, dedication, mental fortitude required, on top of having the right resources and support to achieve these things. She could have made it further if she devoted to one field only.

My point is, if you were to estimate a famous person’s IQ, you wouldn’t just look at their peak performance in their career, but look at everything about their lives in full detail. I know this is controversial, but if I genuinely held a STEM career at MIT while being the best player at a tennis club, top 10 in the world in a video game, while conducting solid research, I truly believe I would have been satisfied and would have seen myself having fulfilled what I needed given my level of intelligence, through a genius-level accomplishment (overall intellectual production at the 1 in a 5 million level).

To grow, I need to move past these artificial labels, find out who I am, and not obsess over trivial things. The labels of “genius,” “prodigy,” and “gifted” don’t mean anything to me anymore. Only through hard work, respect, goodness in my heart, and an appropriate attitude will I achieve anything. I have nothing to prove anymore, and I am genuinely proud of how far I have come and grown no matter what I end up doing in life. I want to live a happy life without having to feel like I need to prove anything.

I learned a lot recently and hope to continue to grow as an individual throughout time. Here is what I have learned.

1) Life is hard sometimes. There are things in life that don’t work out. My problems and insecurities exist, but I realized I don’t need validation from others regarding my achievements or intelligence. The only person I need is me. I’m strong by myself and have to accept who I am without narcissism and condescendence. I don’t need validation from anyone else but myself, and I’m proud of how much I have grown.

2) This has been a challenging process for me, but I learned that you can’t always get what you want. I always wanted to be recognized for my intelligence and validated for the effort I put in, despite lack of support, resources, and recognition, but in the end, I realized my validation didn’t have to come from my intelligence or my achievements. When you work hard for something you want and fail to get recognized, it hurts, but it doesn’t mean I can’t be happy or successful. In the end, I realized my validation or happiness doesn’t have to come out of how others perceive my intelligence or my achievements. I do not have to produce genius-level accomplishments or rely on my breadth of intellectual achievements as comfort. Even if I can’t be a genius (by accomplishments scientific or nonscientific), and even if my intelligence isn’t recognized, it doesn’t mean I can’t be successful, nor should it take my happiness away.

3) Having empathy is essential. I won’t like every person I meet, but learning how to emphasize with others is vital to me to gain long-lasting friends through mutual respect.

4) I must be resilient. No matter the obstacle that comes in my way, I can grow from my experience.

I apologize for my overt narcissism in any part of the interview. I promise to do my best to make the world a better place and contribute meaningfully to society, no matter what I end up pursuing as my profession or how far I go in anything I decide to take up. I do not fear failure anymore.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (ISPE); Member, Torr; Member, Profundus High I.Q. Society; Member, Global Genius Generation Group.

[2] Individual Publication Date: November 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4) [Online].November 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, November 1). Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, November. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (November 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020):November. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Benjamin Li on eSports, STEM, International Chinese Students, and Overcoming the Fear of Failure: Member, International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (4)[Internet]. (2020, November 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/li-4.

License and Copyright

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Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: November 1, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,035

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Kishan Harrysingh is a Member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: some intellectual and spiritual interests; morality; an afterlife; ancient philosophies and religions; and hopes for some of the high-IQ communities.

Keywords: afterlife, ethics, high-IQ communities, intelligence, IQ, Kishan Harrysingh, morality, spirituality, supernatural, World Genius Directory.

Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What are some intellectual and spiritual interests now?

Kishan Harrysingh: Spiritual wise, I found almost everything that I can find in terms of the time frame given to me. Certain things will take more time to unfold. There are certain things only possible through time. You only find some things out with time. I have come to a level of enlightenment, where I believe a lot of scientists term it a simulation theory if it is correct. I have not studied this in great detail. I believe that I have seen enough of the world in which we live; I see enough, constantly. A lot is due to luck. I believe I have seen enough and have enough information to believe this isn’t ultimate reality. It is easier to say this now without worrying about ridicule because a number of physicists and other scientists have said this. We are a simulation of deeper reality. I believe this. It is quite apparent, to me, based on the findings.

Jacobsen: What ethic or morality has been developed from this morality or lifestyle for you?

Harrysingh: A large part of this, my base of ethics comes from Christianity and Buddhism. After that, I try to learn from anything in terms of religion. I try to learn from any religious text. There are a lot of things in Islam, which I find beautiful and in depth. However, there are more in Christianity and Buddhism, which appeal to me. My ethics are pretty simple. I believe in freedom and in non-harm, not doing anything malicious, not stealing, trying not to lie; unless, it is really, really for some greater purpose. Obviously, I try to have a more practical approach to ethics than the traditional one. I believe that religion isn’t completely negative. I believe there’s positives and negatives to it. It is up to us to use common sense and to investigate before believing certain religious ideals and so on. I was, at one point in time, a monk or an inspiring monk who was celibate and completely pious and against alcohol and all of that stuff. I am much more liberal nowadays, having seen the enlightenment, which I was chasing. I am more practical and a little more scientific in terms of understanding the human neurological system and psychology. It goes into the system of ethics. Any proper system of ethics would address those things without giving up too much on virtue. Based on what I understand about the human neurological system, and the human experience itself, I am hesitant to gravitate to any particular religion, though.

Jacobsen: Do you believe in an afterlife?

Harrysingh: Yes and no, I believe in the supernatural. I believe in a higher power, but I don’t necessarily believe in an eternal heaven or an eternal hell, necessarily. However, there may be a form of it, a slightly different form of it. I am not too concerned about it. The real challenge is finding out what we have to find out here. As in life, the afterlife, things will happen as they have to.

Jacobsen: If we take the ancient philosophies and religions, and if we take a context in the early 21st century in which more about the operations of the world, the functional aspects, relations, and objects of the world, are known, and if those philosophies and religions came from a time in which those things were complete mysteries, why don’t we simply create new philosophies and jettison those ancient philosophies and religions? Wherein any taking of the good parts of them, we simply take them, and reincorporate them without any of the baggage.

Harrysingh: Right, that’s, basically, what I was saying. You have to pick and choose and not be a slave, mentally, to some theology, some theory, that may have been misinterpreted or felt by a person or a number of people, or moderate by people, who put it there. It amazes me. When humans could listen to news or religious texts, the problem is the same. In that, they don’t consider context and the reliability of the source. To me, those are very, very obvious problems needing consideration. If people considered those two things, then you wouldn’t have this much violence taking over the U.S. and many other places. This is the practical. This is where spirituality is practical. Because you can look at the polarity of the world and see how divided everyone is. Everyone has good intentions and points. However, they both see each other as equal. One side is yelling, “Racist.” The other side is yelling, “Green, communist.” It is really sad. People cannot moderate their own emotions enough to look at the intentions behind the opponent and try to understand: We’re all human. Both sides are trying to move things along. I feel as though I am probably a more moderate version of both arguments or both sides of the argument. I am a more moderate person who understands both sides of the argument. It is really crazy what is going on. It goes to lack of life experience in some cases. Because of my spirituality, I have travelled to a lot of places. I have looked to the darker part of life to understand it. I put myself in danger, which most people try to avoid in life – to try to find the truth. I wish more people would do that rather than sitting in their comfortable little bubbles and trying to dictate to others what the reality is.

Jacobsen: What are your hopes for some of the high-IQ communities in the future?

Harrysingh: I don’t have hopes for them. They need leadership. Clearly, the societies are stagnant. Hopefully, I can provide some of that. It is one of the projects that I am working on, behind the scenes. There is a need for leadership at this point in time. There is a lot of talent out there, but not a lot of vision. I feel as though my own spiritual vision and enlightenment can help humanity on the whole, but that will take some time. I will need cooperation.

Jacobsen: Kishan, thank you so much for your time.

Harrysingh: Alright!

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: November 1, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2) [Online].November 2020; 24(A). Available from:  http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, November 1). Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2). Retrieved from  http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, November. 2020. < http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A.  http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott  Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (November 2020).  http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: < http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A.,  http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020):November. 2020. Web. < http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Kishan Harrysingh on Spirituality, Ethics, an Afterlife, and Pick-and-Choose Philosophy: Member, World Genius Directory (2)[Internet]. (2020, November 24(A). Available from:  http://www.in-sightjournal.com/harrysingh-2.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: October 22, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 2,001

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Anthony Sepulveda scored 174 (S.D.15) on Cosmic and is a member of the World Genius Directory. He discusses: poor social standing; poor economic standing; depression; other health risks; narcissism; highly intelligent couch potatoes; novel situations in which contexts may be non-commutative; professions valuing intelligence in their employees; Mensa a practical option for reasonably intelligent people; AtlantIQ’s efforts important for pragmatic use of intelligent people; Jeffrey Ford; societies renew themselves; the “very poor condition” of the high-IQ community; identifying the disadvantaged; spatial problems; and a possible Holy Grail of the high-IQ world.

Keywords: Anthony Sepulveda (Brown), AtlantIQ, intellect, Jeffrey Ford, mental illness, motivation, narcissism, society, UNICEF.

Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: While not having the space for a book, necessarily, off the bat, let’s parse the average intelligence question more particularly in the lines delineated, the factors of poor social and economic standing, depression, and other health risks. If we’re looking at poor social standing, what happens in this case of average intellectual function on personality, where interpersonal and prestige stature are not great?

Anthony Sepulveda (Brown)[1],[2]*: The ability to solve a problem can instill a sense of confidence that will last throughout one’s life. It can make anything seem possible if you only make the correct sequence of moves.

Jacobsen: If we’re looking at poor economic standing, what happens in this case of average intellectual function on personality, where income and net wealth is affected?

Sepulveda (Brown): If you’re unable to resolve problems in your life, a general lack of motivation will prevent you from progressing far towards goals. If your goal is to improve your economic status, you need to truly understand your situation and know how to cultivate the tools and resources necessary to gain the funds and skills you need to do so.

Jacobsen: If we’re looking at depression, what happens in this case of average intellectual function on personality, where feeling bad for months or years at a time becomes a formal mental illness?

Sepulveda (Brown): Depression is the result of having a problem that you cannot resolve or accept enough to move on from. By gaining further insight into the nature of that problem you may be able to move forward enough to get through it. But this can be very hard. Increasingly so as time goes by. Human nature is essentially a number of habits we develop over time. And we often tend to pursue options that continue the trend of our lives. Obvious examples are those who grew up in an unhealthy household and grow up to consistently pursue similar relationships because they feel uncomfortable or unworthy around anything better. It kills me to know that no matter how obvious a solution will be, such people will always make the wrong choice.

Jacobsen: If we’re looking at other health risks, what happens in this case of average intellectual function on personality, where inability to self-care leads to generalized increased risk to negative health outcomes?

Sepulveda (Brown): I’m not sure how much of an impact general intelligence has on one’s health. While it can help motivate one’s desire to avoid certain hazards, I’ve encountered people of all levels that either prioritize or avoid exercise and proper nutrition. It seems more likely that one’s health is a tool used to achieve other goals such as boosting your ego, getting attention from others, pursuing careers such as modeling or athletics, feeling superior to those who live unhealthy lives (such as how vegans tend to chastise those who eat meat) or simply to live longer for personal reasons.

Jacobsen: How does narcissism connect to high intelligence and then lead to worse mental health outcomes?

Sepulveda (Brown): Receiving validation for a belief that you’re better than others (intellectually, in this case) will naturally reenforce or promote a narcissistic personality. If such beliefs are founded upon faulty data from a flawed or invalid IQ test, an individual will likely form an equally invalid opinion of themselves or inspire them to pursue paths they aren’t prepared for

Jacobsen: Even if we take the analysis of “actions, interactions and reactions of the objects (nonliving material) and subjects (living material) in an area,” and if we take individuals capable of a greater grasp of the aforementioned “in an area,” what of the factors of motivation to drive action on the analysis? We all know highly intelligent couch potatoes.

Sepulveda (Brown): This is a very interesting problem when analyzing the impact of personality on intelligence. Clearly, one’s patience, attention span, motivation, etc. will have an impact on their ability to solve a specific problem (especially on untimed tests). But there doesn’t seem to be any socially valid method with which to objectively determine and compensate for a person’s personality on an IQ test. Even if we were to set a time for a person to complete a valid test where the time allowed to work on it is based on their level of stress and/or other physiological inhibitions, there’d be no way to prevent people from unfairly compensating (via drugs or mental preparation (i.e. the Practice Effect)).

Jacobsen: What about novel situations in which contexts may be non-commutative?

Sepulveda (Brown): Such situations are very rare and almost any attempt to resolve a problem under such conditions will result in failure. Clear communication is always necessary, especially when two or more people are involved.

Jacobsen: To “professions [that] value intelligence in their employees,” what ones come to mind? Maybe, the uncommon ones rather than ones, typically, stipulated including pure mathematician or theoretical physicist.

Sepulveda (Brown): IT companies like Google use riddles and logic problems during their interview process to determine whether or not a candidate is truly capable of performing the tasks required of them.

Jacobsen: What makes Mensa a practical option for reasonably intelligent people?

Sepulveda (Brown): Mensa has a lot to offer. They consistently publish a variety of new articles for members to enjoy and offer group meetings and lectures that anyone can attend. For me personally, I’ve greatly enjoyed the conversations held at such meetings. I’ve met a few people that I could connect with to form lasting friendships with and attending the lectures inspires me to create presentations of my own.

Jacobsen: What makes AtlantIQ’s efforts important for pragmatic use of intelligent people? Any thoughts on their UNICEF project?

Sepulveda (Brown): I’m aware that they support UNICEF, but I don’t believe that they hold any particular place within the company itself. As for their efforts, I appreciate how often they emphasize the belief that changing the world for the better takes practical effort. To this end, they often hold contests that require members to find solutions to a variety of world problems (education, renewable energy, environmental stability, etc.). Which is a lot more effort towards a much more noble pursuit than almost every other IQ Society performs. I have the utmost respect for Beatrice Rescazzi and those that work with her.

Jacobsen: What makes a person like Jeffrey Ford tick and work to advance concrete actionables for utilization of – what seems like – a real trait in intelligence for positive benefit in reasonable timelines?

Sepulveda (Brown): I wish I knew. I tried contacting him directly to get some insight, but he wasn’t available. So I’m not aware of whether or not he’s had similar internal debates himself. If he has, he clearly believes that even a temporary effect is worth the effort.

Jacobsen: How could these societies renew themselves and not “waste each other’s time”?

Sepulveda (Brown): By requiring higher standards of proof of personal ability, they’ll create an aura of prestige that some may take more seriously. It would also help if they had a purpose beyond simply existing such as a unanimous desire to solve a specific problem.

Jacobsen: What are some of the other factors filtering into the “very poor condition” of the high-IQ community as it lie prostrate in worship of the aforementioned golden calf of false pursuits?

Sepulveda (Brown): The sad fact is that most people seem to join simply to feel good about themselves for joining. They never had any real drive to do anything practical with their gifts and the community as a whole stagnated into its current condition.

Jacobsen: How could tests such as Cattell’s help identify disadvantaged kids? For example, kids in poor countries such as India with innate abilities and talent while lacking resources, or in highly underserved rural communities or reserves of Native Americans in America or Aboriginals in Canada, or Aborigines in Australia or the Maori in New Zealand – the last largest remnant of European colonial history outside of the ongoing Israel-Palestine issue.

Sepulveda (Brown): I suppose it could be used to identify specific kids if there were an incentive like free schooling. But there are several problems – 1. Cattell’s test is clearly designed to be taken by American or European people. The pictures in it correlate with objects that have a specific design primarily found in those areas (such as the shape of a chimney or stove). So while it is the fairest test I’m aware of, it isn’t useful on a global scale.

2. Say we were to successfully identify gifted children in those areas. We’d have to send them miles away from their home, friends and, likely, family in order to bestow anything of value to them. Those areas simply don’t have the facilities necessary to cultivate their gifts to their highest potential and installing one there would take a lot of effort for very little reward. So, unless the relatively minor impact made on such communities as a whole is worth it (as seen in the efforts of non-profit organizations), the whole venture seems like a waste of time.

3. Say we were to successfully find gifted children in those areas and do everything we can to develop their abilities. What then? It seems to me that they’re very unlikely to go back to their original community. Between the choice of family and community vs opportunity, especially if they were extricated as children, one side is gonna be a lot more appealing. So, if the results of our effort is simply the removal of the best people from the poorest communities, all we’ve done is further impoverish those areas.

It’s a difficult problem. The only option I see that would provide the most benefit is to offer those communities the information necessary for them to benefit as a whole.

Jacobsen: Are spatial problems, in a manner of speaking, simply speaking highly general because of being base-level visual logic problems? No words, no numbers, no concepts, no knowledge, no high-level prior experience, immediate sensory perception with a huge hunk of brain tissue devoted to the visual system with the occipital lobe and then internal, non-verbal logical reasoning on the problems presented, as such, with minimal room for false interpretation to the simplest, i.e., correct, solution for the visual presentation to fit, logically.

Sepulveda (Brown): Yes. Which leads to an interesting topic to consider – If there are a finite number of valid problems that can be used to measure intelligence, that would imply that there’s a set limit to how intelligent anyone can be. That’s why I believe that no one is all that much more capable than anyone else. The biggest differences between any two people are their experiences and the motivation those experiences inspired.

Jacobsen: I have speculated in a similar manner in other interviews on a possible Holy Grail of the high-IQ world and, in more general terms, the professional psychometric community within the concept or possibility, if general intelligence and fluid intelligence are taken seriously, of a non-verbal 6-sigma test with the same funding, renormings, sample sizes, and psychological construct reliability and validity of the WAIS, the SB(IS), Cattell’s, or the RAPM. Any thoughts on this possibility? We have a long history of underusing the talent of girls and women, which has been improving for a century. Now, we see an increasing consistency of underused gifted and talented youth, and people, in general with some factors found in income inequality.

Sepulveda (Brown): Of course. I’ve spent a lot of time pondering the subject over the past couple years, mulling over various problems and weighing the pros and cons of their use. It led to the development of my own test X’s and O’s. And I’d like to make more in the future. But I don’t see much point in the effort if no one takes them. I’ve had my test up on James Dorsey’s website for over a year now and haven’t had any submissions yet. Which is a shame. I put a lot of effort into that project.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, World Genius Directory.

[2] Individual Publication Date: October 22, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6) [Online].October 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, October 22). Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6)Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, October. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (October 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020):October. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Anthony Sepulveda (Brown) on Intellectual Function and Personality, Formal Mental Illness, Narcissism, Motivation, AtlantIQ-UNICEF, Jeffrey Ford, Societal Renewal, and a Holy Grail of the High-IQ Communities: Member, World Genius Directory (6)[Internet]. (2020, October 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sepulveda-6.

License and Copyright

License

In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees co-copyright their interview material and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4)

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 24.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (Part Twenty)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: October 22, 2020

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,320

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Tiberiu Sammak is a 24-year-old guy who currently lives in Bucharest. He spent most of his childhood and teenage years surfing the Internet (mostly searching things of interest) and playing video games. One of his hobbies used to be the construction of paper airplanes, spending a couple of years designing and trying to perfect different types of paper aircrafts. Academically, he never really excelled at anything. In fact, his high school record was rather poor. Some of his current interests include cosmology, medicine and cryonics. His highest score on an experimental high-range I.Q. test is 187 S.D. 15, achieved on Paul Cooijmans’ Reason – Revision 2008. He discusses: critically evaluate and reason through information; the other subject matters that have been “intriguing” or “meaningful” based on ‘whims’; cryonics; biological death; the general reaction to the discovery of life on other planets; the general risk factors for cancer formation coming out research in carcinogenesis; other micro interests; advice to other gifted and talented youth who lack motivation, study skills, discipline, and interest in studying; personal experience communicating, exchanging opinions, and sharing ideas; why cultures adhere to supernaturalistic beliefs; some of the favourite contemporary artists; a genius in the modern day; a “decent life”; and people who he considers smarter than himself.

Keywords: art, biological death, carcinogenesis, cryonics, high-IQ, IQ, Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak.

Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: When you’re picking up some information online based on a general interest in some obscure subject matter, and when you’re ‘investigating something in particular, what is the internal thought process there? How do you critically evaluate and reason through information, so as to determine if the information is valuable or not?

Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak[1],[2]*: I don’t really know how to describe the exact mechanisms behind my decision-making process. What I can confirm is that you have to be pretty well-informed on the subject that you are conducting research on to be able to accurately gauge the degree of correctness of your findings.

To me, deciding what information is correct and not inaccurate or deceitful is just common sense (after I know enough about something), roughly speaking.

Jacobsen: What are some of the other subject matters that have been “intriguing” or “meaningful” based on ‘whims’?

Sammak: In-depth lore about certain video games, articles about cellular senescence, philosophical publications (most of the ones I have read or skimmed through being located on the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy website), different stuff about particular movies (or cartoons) or snippets of information about computer-related topics would be some of the subject matters which come to my mind.

Jacobsen: How much of the information around the cryonics is pseudoscience/non-science proposed as scientific information or methodology?

Sammak: The very idea that a brain could regain its consciousness after legal death is what makes other people to be skeptical and reserved about the industry of cryonics. As far as I’m concerned, nothing unscientific pertaining to human cryopreservation is presented as a scientific fact.

Jacobsen: You noted, “I’d like to be more open-minded about it, considering it’s probably the only current possibility to ever be conscious again after the biological death, whereupon eternal oblivion awaits.” Do you consider biological death final?

Sammak: I do, since there is actually no evidence to suggest otherwise. It is very clear that the brain is the organ solely responsible for creating consciousness. However, the precise mechanisms as to how it manages to do that are yet to be fully discovered. An explicit and really straightforward example proving this (that consciousness is entirely generated by the brain) is represented by the way people who are affected by neurodegenerative diseases behave and function. Their consciousness is gradually stripped away by their condition, leaving them unable to perform even the most basic tasks – they become shadows of their former selves.

The cessation of all brain’s functions marks the dawn of an eternal, dreamless sleep. This is an irreversible process (brain death) which will eventually occur at some point in time. This process might be delayed with future technologies, but all organic matter is subject to decay nonetheless.

I cannot imagine a different yet plausible scenario after the biological death. I wish I were wrong though.

Jacobsen: What do you think would be the general reaction to the discovery of life on other planets?

Sammak: My guess is that the prevalent reaction would be surprise. The first encounter (not necessarily a physical one) with an extraterrestrial lifeform would cause wonder and stir great curiosity, to say the least.

However, the chances of a physical encounter with an alien being in the current timeframe are probably non-existent or incredibly low.

Jacobsen: Based on the research, what are the general risk factors for cancer formation coming out research in carcinogenesis?

Sammak: As far as I know, there are many risk factors which could potentially alter one’s genes and lead to the onset of cancer, such as hereditary (like Li-Fraumeni syndrome or von Hippel-Lindau syndrome) or environmental factors, lifestyle choices, obesity, or old age. Most cancers are sporadic but some of them could be prevented by simply not indulging in self-destructive behaviors, such as alcohol abuse (which could lead to cirrhosis of the liver and then evolve into a hepatocellular carcinoma) or smoking. It’s worth mentioning that most lung cancers are caused by tobacco use and they could actually be avoided. Some lung cancers are known to develop chiefly (with few exceptions) in smokers’ lungs, like small cell lung cancer, which is much more aggressive than non-small cell lung cancer. Unlike other cancers, lung cancer has a very poor prognosis. To my knowledge, only a few malignancies would have a dimmer outcome (for instance, mesothelioma, exocrine pancreatic cancers or grade IV brain tumors, such as GBM).

Another environmental risk factor that I’d like to bring into discussion is represented by the asbestos exposure. A notable case which emphasizes the dangers of inhaling asbestos fiber was known as the Wittenoom tragedy. Wittenoom (now a degazetted ghost town) was a town which was mainly known for its asbestos mine and for asbestos mining and milling activities. Due to long-term exposure to crocidolite (also known as blue asbestos) fibers, a lot of miners and even people who were mere inhabitants developed pleural or peritoneal mesothelioma, which is a very lethal type of cancer.

Jacobsen: Any other micro interests akin to paper airplanes?

Sammak: Not really.

Jacobsen: What is the advice to other gifted and talented youth who lack motivation, study skills, discipline, and interest in studying? This can be ideas or pragmatic stuff.

Sammak: I don’t have specific advice for such people. Things like motivation when it comes to achieving certain goals and self-discipline are internal and cannot be imposed on someone. Sure, one may instill motivation in someone by inspiring that someone through different means. In my view, this is probably one of the best ways to motivate a person.

Perhaps having a really great mentor who could offer guidance throughout youthhood would be beneficial for these people as well.

Jacobsen: What has been personal experience communicating, exchanging opinions, and sharing ideas with others who performed above a similar level on cognitive ability tests?

Sammak: I’ve had very few interactions with people from the high-range testing community. However, almost all of the interactions turned to be positive and enjoyable.

Jacobsen: Why do you think many in cultures adhere to supernaturalistic beliefs?

Sammak: I suppose that’s because many are not well-informed when it comes to a certain topic. Many like to speculate and form twisted views about different subject matters when they are ill-informed. It is way easier to take something for granted than to actually search about that something.

I think the belief in the supernatural is inextricably linked with the unknown.

Jacobsen: Who are some of the favourite contemporary artists for you? Why them?

Sammak: I will mention only musical artists, since I listen a lot to music and I do believe these guys do a great job. In no particular order, my favorite musical artists or musical bands are: Paul Oakenfold, Disturbed, The Anix, Klayton (with his three projects: Celldweller, Scandroid and Circle of Dust), Disarmonia Mundi, Poets of the Fall, Christian Älvestam and The Midnight. These are probably the people or bands whose music I enjoy the most.

I consider some of their songs truly beautiful and awe-inspiring.

Jacobsen: Who do you consider a genius in the modern day?

Sammak: I cannot answer this since I have not thoroughly and carefully studied the works of truly exceptional people and I’m not the guy who would label someone as a genius so readily. Moreover, I was never interested in the work of a particular person to actually devote enough time studying it.

Jacobsen: What would comprise a “decent life” to you? You seem concerned about degradation and death more than many other things.

Sammak: A life where I wouldn’t have to constantly worry about taxes or about not having enough money for basic needs, a life in which I would be satisfied with my efforts, a life where I would be happy.

Jacobsen: Who do you consider smarter than yourself?

Sammak: There are quite a few people whom I personally know and who are smarter than I, or at least seem to be smarter than I.

Jacobsen: Thank you for the opportunity and your time, Tiberiu.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Highest score: Reason – Revision 2008, IQ 187 (S.D.15).

[2] Individual Publication Date: October 22, 2020: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4; Full Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2021: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4) [Online].October 2020; 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2020, October 22). Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A, October. 2020. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2020.  Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 24.A (October 2020). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2020, ‘Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 24.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 24.A (2020):October. 2020. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Tiberiu Nicolas Sammak on Critical Evaluation, Whims, Cryonics, Biological Death, Carcinogenesis, Advice, and Contemporary Artists: High-IQ Community Member (4)[Internet]. (2020, October 24(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/sammak-4.

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